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How and Why We Read: Crash Course English Literature #1
 
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In which John Green kicks off the Crash Course Literature mini series with a reasonable set of questions. Why do we read? What's the point of reading critically. John will argue that reading is about effectively communicating with other people. Unlike a direct communication though, the writer has to communicate with a stranger, through time and space, with only "dry dead words on a page." So how's that going to work? Find out with Crash Course Literature! Also, readers are empowered during the open letter, so that's pretty cool. The Reading List! Romeo and Juliet by William Shakespeare: http://dft.ba/-shakespearerj The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald: http://dft.ba/-fitzgeraldgg Catcher in the Rye: http://dft.ba/-catcher Complete Poems of Emily Dickinson: http://dft.ba/-dickinson Some of these are available from gutenberg.org as free ebooks. You should check that out. Follow us! @thecrashcourse @realjohngreen @raoulmeyer @crashcoursestan @thoughtbubbler @saysdanica Support CrashCourse on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/crashcourse
Views: 3332383 CrashCourse
How to Analyze Literature
 
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Have a literary analysis paper coming up? This is one of the trickier types of essays for a lot of college students. Watch this video to learn a strategy for approaching literary analysis and to see an example.
What is ORAL INTERPRETATION? What does ORAL INTERPRETATION mean? ORAL INTERPRETATION meaning
 
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What is ORAL INTERPRETATION? What does ORAL INTERPRETATION mean? ORAL INTERPRETATION meaning - ORAL INTERPRETATION definition - ORAL INTERPRETATION explanation. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6UuCPh7GrXznZi0Hz2YQnQ Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. Oral Interpretation is a dramatic art, also commonly called "interpretive reading" and "dramatic reading", though these terms are more conservative and restrictive. In certain applications, oral interpretation is also a theatre art – as in reader's theatre, in which a work of literature is performed with manuscripts in hand or, more traditionally, using stools and music stands; and especially chamber theatre, which dispenses with manuscripts and uses what may be described as essentialist costuming and stage lighting, and suggestive scenery. The term is succinctly defined by Paul Campbell (The Speaking and Speakers of Literature; Dickinson, 1967) as the "oralization of literature"; or more eloquently, if less intelligibly, by Charlotte Lee and Timothy Gura (Oral Interpretation; Houghton-Mifflin, 1997) as "the art of communicating to an audience a work of literary art in its intellectual, emotional, and aesthetic entirety". Historically essential to Charlotte Lee's definition of oral interpretation is the fact the performer is "reading from a manuscript". This perspective, once the majority view, has long since become the minority opinion on the question; so that whether one is or is not reading from a manuscript, the art retains the same name. Voice and movement technique is opsis ("spectacle") while oral interpretation is, conceptually, melopoiia ("music technique"). Because oral interpretation is an essential dramatic element in all performance art (even dance, in which the oral element is most typically a silent element), all actors, singers, storytellers, etc., are interpreters – but not all interpreters are necessarily actors, or singers, or storytellers, and so on. When, for example, the writer David Sedaris reads one of his stories on stage, or when Leonard Cohen performs one of his lyric poems, they are both engaged in the art of oral interpretation. But Sedaris is no actor, and even Cohen himself would say that he is no singer. In the United States, there is a historic and purely academic argument as to whether oral interpretation and drama/theatre performance are different names for the same thing or whether they are completely different art forms. This argument is almost exclusively found at colleges and universities whose theatre programs evolved in departments historically or currently called "English and Speech", "Speech and Dramatic Arts" or "Communication and Theatre Arts". The argument is rarely heard in theatre programs that did not evolve out of English and/or Speech Communication departments, such as those associated with schools/colleges of music. In high schools across the United States, Oral Interpretation is a very highly valued competition event, particularly in the mid-western states, such as Nebraska, Iowa, and South Dakota. Students select a work of literature, make a cutting of the literature to fit a time limit of 10 minutes, and perform it in several rounds at tournaments across their state. The piece must be from a published, worthwhile piece of literature, with the exception of Readers Theatre. The categories of said event are as follows: 1. Serious Prose—Interpretation of a work of prose literature with a serious basis. Single-person event. 2. Humorous Interp—Interpretation of any published work of comedic literature. Single-person event 3. Dramatic Interp—Interpretation of a dramatic play with a serious nature. Single-person event. 4. Poetry—Interpretation of a published work of poetry. Single-person event. 5. Non-Original Oratory—Interpretation of an oratorical speech that has been previously delivered. Single-person event. 6. Duo Interpretation—Interpretation of a piece of literature where two Interpers are involved. The pair may not look at nor touch each other, and must deliver the piece in the direction of the audience. This category has the most stringent rules. 7. Readers Theatre—A theatrical interpretation performance where 3-6 people participate. They may perform an original piece, or they may take a cutting from a work of literature. This category has the least amount of rules.
Views: 1094 The Audiopedia
What is INTERPRETATION? What does INTERPRETATION mean? How to pronounce INTERPRETATION?
 
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What is INTERPRETATION? What does INTERPRETATION mean? INTERPRETATION meaning - INTERPRETATION definition - INTERPRETATION explanation - How to pronounce INTERPRETATION? Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license.
Views: 4453 The Audiopedia
What is AESTHETIC INTERPRETATION? What does AESTHETIC INTERPRETATION mean?
 
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What is AESTHETIC INTERPRETATION? What does AESTHETIC INTERPRETATION mean? AESTHETIC INTERPRETATION meaning - AESTHETIC INTERPRETATION definition - AESTHETIC INTERPRETATION explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. An interpretation in philosophy of art, is an explanation of the meaning of some work of art. An interpretation expresses an understanding of a work of art, a poem, performance, or piece of literature. Readers may approach reading a text from different starting points. A student assigned to interpret a poem for class comes at reading differently from someone on the beach reading a novel for escapist pleasure. "Interpretation" implies the conscious task of making sense out of a piece of writing that may not be clear at first glance or that may reward deeper reading even if it at first appears perfectly clear. The beach reader will probably not need to interpret what she or he reads, but the student will. Professor Louise Rosenblatt, a specialist in the study of the reading process, distinguished between reading "stances" occupying the opposite ends of a spectrum. "Aesthetic reading" differs from "efferent" in that the former describes a reader coming to the text expecting to devote attention to the words themselves, to take pleasure in their sounds, images, connotations, etc. "Efferent reading," on the other hand, describes someone "reading for knowledge, for information, or for the conclusion to an argument, or maybe for directions as to action, as in a recipe . . . , reading for what going to carry away afterwards. I term this efferent reading." That is what "efferent" means, leading or conducting away from something, in this case information from a text. On this view, poems and stories do not offer the reader a message to carry away, but a pleasure in which to participate actively—aesthetically. There are many different theories of interpretation. On the one hand, there may be innumerable interpretations for any given piece of art, any one of which may be considered valid. However, it may also be claimed that there really is only one valid interpretation for any given piece of art. The aesthetic theory that says people may approach art with different but equally valid aims is called "pluralism." But the aim of some of interpretations is such that they claim to be true or false. A "relativistic" kind of claim—between "All readings are equally good" and "Only one reading is correct"—holds that readings that tie together more details of the text and that gain approval of practiced readers are better than ones that do not. One kind of relativistic interpretation is called "formal," referring to the "form" or shape of patterns in the words of a text, especially a poem or song. Pointing to the rhymes at the ends of lines is an objective set of resemblances in a poem. A reader of Edgar Allan Poe's "The Raven" cannot help but hear the repetition of "nevermore" as a formal element of Poe's poem. Less obvious and a bit subjective would be an interpreter's pointing to the resemblance tying together all the mentions of weariness, napping, dreaming, and the drug nepenthe. Some students of the reading process advocate that a reader should attempt to identify what the artist is trying to accomplish and interpret the art in terms of whether or not the artist has succeeded. Professor E. D. Hirsch wrote two books arguing that "the author's intention must be the ultimate determiner of meaning."E. D. Hirsch In this controversial view, there is a single correct interpretation consistent with the artists intention for any given art work.
Views: 591 The Audiopedia
Literary Theory & Criticism: Crash Course for UGC NET English (Part 1)
 
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Having sleepless nights , horrifying dreams of literary theory not letting you to be at peace? The most dreaded topic of NTA UGC NET English is literary theory but it is not that difficult as it seems. As the saying goes the toughest are the easiest to conquest ,Literary theory also is easy to conquer. All you need are a few tricks here and there . So to be friends with literary theory be a part of our crash course and conquer the most dreaded enemy of UGC NET English 'Literary Theory'. Struggling to find NTA UGC NET/JRF English coaching near your home? Join India's finest online coaching for NTA UGC NET/JRF English Literature only at https://www.arpitakarwa.com/ Our NTA UGC NET English Online Course includes 800 Audios, 200 PDFs, 300 Mock Tests. The Course also covers all states SET/SLET syllabus. NTA UGC NET English Online Course Details: https://bit.ly/2GOA6J4 NTA UGC NET Course Video (10 Minutes) https://bit.ly/2wGZc9w NTA UGC NET Detailed Course Syllabus: https://bit.ly/2WVRRi4 Quick Revision PDFs on Most Important Topics: http://bit.ly/2HaUp6N Mock Test Series for NTA UGC NET English: https://bit.ly/2C85Jjy Demo Audios & PDFs: https://bit.ly/2wol3Tg Result of our Students: https://bit.ly/2LFwkJc Arpita’s Educational Qualification: https://bit.ly/2UJSLkb Solved Previous Year Papers of NTA UGC NET: https://bit.ly/2U5OrYe Follow us to receive GoNETQuiz & latest UGC NET updates: Whatsapp: 7976603731 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/arpitakarwa.ugcnet/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/arpitakarwa.ugcnet/ YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/arpitakarwa/ Telegram: http://www.t.me/arpitakarwa #LiteraryTheory #Criticism #EnglishLiterature
Views: 124547 Arpita Karwa
Quentin Skinner - Belief, Truth and Interpretation
 
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Some sound problems begin at 3:40 and end at 3:58! This is a lecture by Quentin Skinner that he gave on 18 November, 2014 during the conference "Ideengeschichte. Traditionen und Perspektiven" at the Ruhr-University Bochum.
Views: 19504 Timothy Goering
Is There Truth in Interpretation? Law, Literature and History
 
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Ronald Dworkin, professor of jurisprudence at University College London and the New York University School of Law, delivers the inaugural Frederic R. and Molly S. Kellogg Biennial Lecture on Jurisprudence in the Coolidge Auditorium of the Library of Congress. Speaker Biography: Born in Worcester, Mass., Ronald Dworkin was educated at Harvard University and Magdalen College, Oxford, where he was a Rhodes Scholar and a student of prominent British lawyer and academic Sir Rupert Cross. Dworkin attended Harvard Law School and subsequently clerked for Judge Learned Hand of the United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit. A former professor of jurisprudence at the University of Oxford, Dworkin is widely known as one of the foremost American legal philosophers. He is the author of many articles in philosophical and legal journals and has written numerous books, as well as articles on legal and political topics in the New York Review of Books. In 2007, Dworkin was awarded the Holberg Memorial Prize in the Humanities by the Kingdom of Norway.
Views: 112973 LibraryOfCongress
Hermeneutics: A Very Short Introduction | Jens Zimmermann
 
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Author Jens Zimmermann tells us the top 10 things you should know about Hermeneutics. https://global.oup.com/academic/produ... Jens Zimmermann is Professor of Humanities and Canada Research Chair for Interpretation, Religion and Culture at Trinity Western University, Canada. As well as speaking on the importance of hermeneutics and religion to lay audiences and graduate students, he has published books on theological hermeneutics in both English and German and has written articles on hermeneutics in academic journals. © Oxford University Press
The Handmaids Tale Part 1: Crash Course Literature #403
 
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In which John Green teaches you about Margaret Atwood's speculative fiction novel, The Handmaid's Tale. John looks at some of the themes in this classic dystopian novel, many of which are kind of a downer. The world of Gilead that Atwood created looks at a lot of the issues that we deal with today, and the very human impulse to return to an imagined golden era, thereby solving all of our modern world's problems. Yeah, it doesn't work like that. Crash Course is made with Adobe Creative Cloud. Get a free trial here: http://www.adobe.com/creativecloud.html Crash Course is on Patreon! You can support us directly by signing up at http://www.patreon.com/crashcourse Thanks to the following Patrons for their generous monthly contributions that help keep Crash Course free for everyone forever: Mark Brouwer, Divonne Holmes à Court, Brian Thomas Gossett, Khaled El Shalakany, Indika Siriwardena, Robert Kunz, SR Foxley, Sam Ferguson, Yasenia Cruz, Daniel Baulig, Eric Koslow, Caleb Weeks, Tim Curwick, Jessica Wode, Cami Wilson, Eric Prestemon, Evren Türkmenoğlu, Alexander Tamas, Justin Zingsheim, D.A. Noe, Shawn Arnold, Tom Trval, mark austin, Ruth Perez, Malcolm Callis, Kathrin Janßen, Ken Penttinen, Advait Shinde, Cody Carpenter, Annamaria Herrera, Nathan Taylor, William McGraw, Bader AlGhamdi, Vaso, Melissa Briski, Joey Quek, Andrei Krishkevich, Rachel Bright, Alex S, Mayumi Maeda, Kathy & Tim Philip, Montather, Jirat, Eric Kitchen, Moritz Schmidt, Ian Dundore, Chris Peters, Sandra Aft, Jason A Saslow, Steve Marshall -- Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 599210 CrashCourse
Studying Translation.
 
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The story of what studying translation at Leiden University for my MA was like. Studying English at Leiden University. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DLobAD6KDZg Follow what I'm reading. http://www.goodreads.com/booksandquills My face on the MySpace http://www.twitter.com/booksandquills http://booksandquills.blogspot.com http://booksandquills.tumblr.com Second channel. http://www.youtube.com/inturretandtree http://inturretandtree.tumblr.com Beauty channel with Marionhoney. http://www.youtube.com/derpinamode http://derpinamode.tumblr.com Instagram | booksandquills
Views: 60252 booksandquills
Richard Posner: Interpreting the Law
 
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If you're interested in licensing this or any other Big Think clip for commercial or private use, contact our licensing partner Executive Interviews: https://www.executiveinterviews.biz/contact-us/americas/ http://bigthink.com Judge Posner talks about the uncertainty of American law and why this means that Judges can't always makes cost-benefit analysis. He goes on to talk about his ideological development and reacting negatively to the Vietnam protests. Question: Does personal experience shape your approach to the law?   Richard Posner: Well I think very substantially. This is the fun of it actually. American law is extremely uncertain. And now the majority, even, given that the majority of cases are cut and dried if you look across the whole American system with their millions of cases filed every year. And most of them have no merit, or some have obvious merit. But when you're talking about a federal appeals court, a significant fraction of the cases that come to us arise in unsettled areas, or the facts are very uncertain. When you get to the Supreme Court, the percentage of really indeterminate cases are really much higher. But at our level it's high. It is significant. There are two kinds of uncertainties. Statisticians make a distinction between risk and uncertainty. Risk is where there's uncertainty, there's a lack of certainty, but some probability can be assigned to the risk. So you can deal with it. Uncertainty in the way some statisticians use the term means there's no probability that can be assigned to this risk, but you still have to deal with it. So an example would be suppose you're deciding whether to get married. You can actually assign a risk of divorce. You can look at the statistics on divorce and say, you know, 50 percent of marriages end in divorce. But you don't know the probability of your marriage ending in divorce, right? So that's uncertain. You still have to make a choice, but you couldn't assign a probability. You couldn't do a cost-benefit analysis. Well that's the position we're in much of the time, and those are the interesting cases. And if you think of the marriage choice, what is going to determine your decision is going to be highly personal to you. And that's true with the judges. So your ideology, your temperament, your response, your experience. You may have been a defense lawyer -- a criminal defense lawyer. That's giving you some perspective. If you've been a prosecutor, that's giving you another perspective. Academic, something else. If you have what's called an "authoritarian" personality, you're going to be conservative, and you're probably going to be very rule oriented. You're going to set a very high value of "definiteness". And if you're the opposite personality, not. And as I mentioned Justice Breyer, he doesn't like rules. He likes very general standards. And some of his colleagues are the opposite, like Justice Scalia. He really likes rules. He doesn't like standards. And that, I think, is the temperamental difference. Temperament being shaped by biological factors, but also by upbringing, experience, the times in which you grew up. One of the things I know shaped my own ideological development is I reacted very negatively to the riots and protests in the Vietnam period. I really dislike that stuff. And I think that had an effect. Now of course other people reacted the opposite. They thought this was terrific. You know they're nostalgic for it. So the same experiences can have different effects on people depending on I think, you know, deep psychological factors which are _________ biological. But as a I say, whenever you have people who are making decisions that are not . . . cannot be made in a kind of an algorithmic way in applying a formula. And to an economist, the epitome of algorithmic decision making is cost benefit analysis. And it would be nice if in a case we could say that we decide one way, there's some probability of the following measurable adverse consequences in future cases as a result of adopting this rule. But you rarely can do it. In a larger number of cases, you can't do a statistical analysis, but you know that the adverse consequences of one choice greatly outweigh that of the other. But then as I say, there's a large number of cases where you simply do not know. And so your personal characteristics then shape your decision.   Recorded on: Nov 21, 2007
Views: 21098 Big Think
What is POSTCOLONIALISM? What does POSTCOLONIALISM mean? POSTOCOLONIALISM meaning
 
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✪✪✪✪✪ Mobile phone based cryptocurrency. No mining, just visit the app once a day, tap the button and watch your coins grow - https://minepi.com/almir1977 ✪✪✪✪✪ ✪✪✪✪✪ The Audiopedia Android application, INSTALL NOW - https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.wTheAudiopedia_8069473 ✪✪✪✪✪ What is POSTCOLONIALISM? What does POSTCOLONIALISM mean? POSTOCOLONIALISM meaning - POSTCOLONIALISM definition - POSTCOLONIALISM explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. Postcolonialism or postcolonial studies is an academic discipline that analyzes, explains, and responds to the cultural legacy of colonialism and imperialism. Postcolonialism speaks about the human consequences of external control and economic exploitation of a native people and its lands. Drawing from postmodern schools of thought, postcolonial studies analyse the politics of knowledge (creation, control, and distribution) by examining the functional relations of social and political power that sustain colonialism and neocolonialism—the imperial regime's depictions (social, political, cultural) of the colonizer and of the colonized. As a genre of contemporary history, postcolonialism questions and reinvents the manner in which a culture is being viewed, challenging the narratives expounded during the colonial era. Anthropologically, it records human nations between the colonists and the peoples under colonial rule, seeking to build an understanding of the nature and practice of colonial rule. As a critical theory, it presents, explains, and illustrates the ideology and practice of neocolonialism with examples drawn from history, political science, philosophy, sociology, anthropology, and human geography. It also examines the effects of colonial rule on the cultural aspects of the colony and its treatment of women, language, literature, and humanity. As an epistemology (the study of knowledge, its nature and verifiability), as an ethics (moral philosophy), and as a politics (affairs of the citizenry), the field of postcolonialism address the politics of knowledge—the matters that constitute the postcolonial identity of a decolonised people, which derives from: (i) the coloniser's generation of cultural knowledge about the colonised people; and (ii) how that Western cultural knowledge was applied to subjugate a non–European people into a colony of the European Mother Country, which, after initial invasion, was effected by means of the cultural identities of 'coloniser' and 'colonised'. A decolonised people develop a postcolonial identity from the cultural interactions among the types of identity (cultural, national, ethnic) and the social relations of sex, class, and caste; determined by the gender and the race of the colonised person; and the racism inherent to the structures of a colonial society. In postcolonial literature, the anti-conquest narrative analyses the identity politics that are the social and cultural perspectives of the subaltern colonial subjects—their creative resistance to the culture of the coloniser; how such cultural resistance complicated the establishment of a colonial society; how the colonisers developed their postcolonial identity; and how neocolonialism actively employs the Us-and-Them binary social relation to view the non-Western world as inhabited by The Other. The neocolonial discourse of geopolitical homogeneity conflates the decolonised peoples, their cultures, and their countries, into an imaginary place, such as "the Third World", an over-inclusive term that usually comprises continents and seas, i.e. Africa, Asia, Latin America, and Oceania. The postcolonial critique analyses the self-justifying discourse of neocolonialism and the functions (philosophic and political) of its over-inclusive terms, to establish the factual and cultural inaccuracy of homogeneous concepts, such as "the Arabs" and "the First World", "Christendom" and "the Muslim World", actually comprise heterogeneous peoples, cultures, and geography, and that realistic descriptions of the world's peoples, places, and things require nuanced and accurate terms.
Views: 57889 The Audiopedia
9. Linguistics and Literature
 
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Introduction to Theory of Literature (ENGL 300) In this lecture on the work of Roman Jakobson, Professor Paul Fry continues his discussion of synchrony and diachrony. The relationships among formalism, semiotics, and linguistics are explored. Claude Levi-Strauss's structural interpretation of the Oedipus myth is discussed in some detail. In order to differentiate Jakobson's poetic functions, Professor Fry analyzes the sentence "It is raining" from six perspectives. Significant attention is paid to the use of diagrams in literary linguistic theory. 00:00 - Chapter 1. Synchrony and Diachrony 06:47 - Chapter 2. The Emergence of Structuralism 11:24 - Chapter 3. The Relationship Between Formalism and Semiotics 17:33 - Chapter 4. Levi-Strauss and the Meaning of the Oedipus Myth 26:19 - Chapter 5. The Poetic Function 32:49 - Chapter 6. Jacobson's Six Functions 43:53 - Chapter 7. Metalanguage and Poetic Function Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses This course was recorded in Spring 2009.
Views: 170300 YaleCourses
Pride and Prejudice Part 1: Crash Course Literature #411
 
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In which a series about literature, which is wanting of an episode on Jane Austen, gets the first of two episodes. It's Pride and Prejudice, everybody! John Green talks about Pride and Prejudice as a product of Regency England, gives you a short biographical look at author Jane Austen, and familiarizes you with the web of human connections this book spins. Crash Course is on Patreon! You can support us directly by signing up at http://www.patreon.com/crashcourse Thanks to the following Patrons for their generous monthly contributions that help keep Crash Course free for everyone forever: Mark Brouwer, Nickie Miskell Jr., Jessica Wode, Eric Prestemon, Kathrin Benoit, Tom Trval, Jason Saslow, Nathan Taylor, Divonne Holmes à Court, Brian Thomas Gossett, Khaled El Shalakany, Indika Siriwardena, Robert Kunz, SR Foxley, Sam Ferguson, Yasenia Cruz, Daniel Baulig, Eric Koslow, Caleb Weeks, Tim Curwick, Evren Türkmenoğlu, Alexander Tamas, Justin Zingsheim, D.A. Noe, Shawn Arnold, mark austin, Ruth Perez, Malcolm Callis, Ken Penttinen, Advait Shinde, Cody Carpenter, Annamaria Herrera, William McGraw, Bader AlGhamdi, Vaso, Melissa Briski, Joey Quek, Andrei Krishkevich, Rachel Bright, Alex S, Mayumi Maeda, Kathy & Tim Philip, Montather, Jirat, Eric Kitchen, Moritz Schmidt, Ian Dundore, Chris Peters, Sandra Aft, Steve Marshall -- Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 324507 CrashCourse
Fate, Family, and Oedipus Rex: Crash Course Literature 202
 
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You can directly support Crash Course at https://www.patreon.com/crashcourse Subscribe for as little as $0 to keep up with everything we're doing. Free is nice, but if you can afford to pay a little every month, it really helps us to continue producing this content. In which John Green teaches you about one of the least family-friendly family dramas in the history of family dramas, Oedipus Rex. Sophocles' most famous play sees it's main character, who seems like he's got it all together, find out that he's killed his father, married his mother, had a bunch of incest children, and brought a plague down on his adopted hometown. He doesn't take this news well. John touches on all the classic Oedipus themes, including hamartia, fate, and the wrath of the gods, and even gets into some Freud, although Oedipus was notably not a sufferer of an Oedipus complex. In any case get ready for mystery, incest, bird entrails, and self-inflicted blindness. Very dramatic.
Views: 1633933 CrashCourse
LITERATURE: Franz Kafka
 
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Franz Kafka is a guide to some very dark feelings most of us know well concerned with powerlessness, self-disgust and anxiety. This literary genius turned the stuff of nightmares into redemptive, consoling art. If you like our films take a look at our shop (we ship worldwide): https://www.theschooloflife.com/shop/ Brought to you by http://www.theschooloflife.com Produced in collaboration with Mike Booth http://youtube.com/somegreybloke and Carla Pereira http://carlapereiradocampo.blogspot.co.uk/ #TheSchoolOfLife
Views: 1107031 The School of Life
To Kill a Mockingbird, Part I - Crash Course Literature 210
 
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You can directly support Crash Course at https://www.patreon.com/crashcourse Subscribe for as little as $0 to keep up with everything we're doing. Free is nice, but if you can afford to pay a little every month, it really helps us to continue producing this content. In which John Green teaches you about Harper Lee's famous (and only) novel, To Kill a Mockingbird. John will cover a bit about Harper Lee's personal life, (seeing as this novel has some autobiographical elements) and her long association with Truman Capote, who figures as a character in the book. You'll get an overview of the plot, and we'll talk a bit about Mockingbird as an example of bildungsroman (again(man, this description is heavy on parentheses)) and Southern Gothic, and look into the novel as a commentary on the racism and patriarchy of the Alabama in which Harper Lee grew up.
Views: 1434317 CrashCourse
1984 by George Orwell, Part 1: Crash Course Literature 401
 
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In which John Green returns for a dystopian new season of Crash Course Literature! We're starting with George Orwell's classic look at the totalitarian state that could be in post-war England. Winston Smith is under the eye of Big Brother, and making us think about surveillance, the role of government, and how language can play a huge part in repressive regimes. Crash Course is made with Adobe Creative Cloud. Get a free trial: www.adobe.com/creativecloud/catalog/desktop.html Crash Course is on Patreon! You can support us directly by signing up at http://www.patreon.com/crashcourse Thanks to the following Patrons for their generous monthly contributions that help keep Crash Course free for everyone forever: Mark Brouwer, Divonne Holmes à Court, Brian Thomas Gossett, Khaled El Shalakany, Indika Siriwardena, Robert Kunz, SR Foxley, Sam Ferguson, Yasenia Cruz, Daniel Baulig, Eric Koslow, Caleb Weeks, Tim Curwick, Jessica Wode, Cami Wilson, Eric Prestemon, Evren Türkmenoğlu, Alexander Tamas, Justin Zingsheim, D.A. Noe, Shawn Arnold, Tom Trval, mark austin, Ruth Perez, Malcolm Callis, Kathrin Janßen, Ken Penttinen, Advait Shinde, Cody Carpenter, Annamaria Herrera, Nathan Taylor, William McGraw, Bader AlGhamdi, Vaso, Melissa Briski, Joey Quek, Andrei Krishkevich, Rachel Bright, Alex S, Mayumi Maeda, Kathy & Tim Philip, Montather, Jirat, Eric Kitchen, Moritz Schmidt, Ian Dundore, Chris Peters, Sandra Aft, Jason A Saslow, Steve Marshall -- Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 1003036 CrashCourse
What makes something "Kafkaesque"? - Noah Tavlin
 
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View full lesson: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/what-makes-something-kafkaesque-noah-tavlin The term Kafkaesque has entered the vernacular to describe unnecessarily complicated and frustrating experiences, especially with bureaucracy. But does standing in a long line to fill out confusing paperwork really capture the richness of Kafka’s vision? Beyond the word’s casual use, what makes something "Kafkaesque"? Noah Tavlin explains. Lesson by Noah Tavlin, animation by TED-Ed.
Views: 3590186 TED-Ed
Free Will, Witches, Murder, and Macbeth (Part 1): Crash Course Literature #409
 
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The Sound! The Fury! Today, we're talking about Shakespeare's Scottish play, Macbeth. So, was Macbeth really predestined to do all the murdering and bad kinging and other terrible stuff? That's the big question in Macbeth, and it's one of the ideas we're going to talk about today, among many. Also, Yoda joins us for the open letter. Crash Course is on Patreon! You can support us directly by signing up at http://www.patreon.com/crashcourse Thanks to the following Patrons for their generous monthly contributions that help keep Crash Course free for everyone forever: Mark Brouwer, Nickie Miskell Jr., Jessica Wode, Eric Prestemon, Kathrin Benoit, Tom Trval, Jason Saslow, Nathan Taylor, Divonne Holmes à Court, Brian Thomas Gossett, Khaled El Shalakany, Indika Siriwardena, Robert Kunz, SR Foxley, Sam Ferguson, Yasenia Cruz, Daniel Baulig, Eric Koslow, Caleb Weeks, Tim Curwick, Evren Türkmenoğlu, Alexander Tamas, Justin Zingsheim, D.A. Noe, Shawn Arnold, mark austin, Ruth Perez, Malcolm Callis, Ken Penttinen, Advait Shinde, Cody Carpenter, Annamaria Herrera, William McGraw, Bader AlGhamdi, Vaso, Melissa Briski, Joey Quek, Andrei Krishkevich, Rachel Bright, Alex S, Mayumi Maeda, Kathy & Tim Philip, Montather, Jirat, Eric Kitchen, Moritz Schmidt, Ian Dundore, Chris Peters, Sandra Aft, Steve Marshall -- Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 380737 CrashCourse
Know how to interpret an epidemic curve?
 
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Epidemic curves are a visual representation of the onset of cases in an outbreak. In this video Dr Greg Martin explains how to interpret and epidemic curve for point source outbreaks, common source outbreaks and propagated outbreaks. Epidemiologists and public health professionals use epi-curves (or epidemic / epidemiological) curves to better understand infectious disease outbreaks. This video was created with support from the University of Notre Dame. Find out more about their program here: http://ntrda.me/2btUrXb If you're interested in epidemiology then consider watching the epidemiology playlist on this channel, here: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLujS9ooBebKWlbmIQOtYaJBjKE4VSimXJ
Why should you read James Joyce's "Ulysses"? - Sam Slote
 
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Download a free audiobook and support TED-Ed's nonprofit mission: http://adbl.co/2y0J0DT Check out James Joyce's "Ulysses": https://shop.ed.ted.com/collections/ted-ed-book-recommendations/products/ulysses View full lesson: https://ed.ted.com/lessons/why-should-you-read-james-joyce-s-ulysses-sam-slote James Joyce's “Ulysses” is widely considered to be both a literary masterpiece and one of the hardest works of literature to read. It inspires such devotion that once a year, thousands of people all over the world dress up like the characters, take to the streets, and read the book aloud. So what is it about this novel that inspires so many people? Sam Slote uncovers the allure of this epic tome. Lesson by Sam Slote, directed by Paper Panther. Thank you so much to our patrons for your support! Without you this video would not be possible. Jayant Sahewal, Marvin Vizuett, Marylise Chauffeton, سلطان الخليفي, Connor Wytko, Vinicius Lhullier, Sama Aafghani, Hannah Beth, Peter Owen, Mandeep Singh, Abhijit Kiran Valluri, Morgan Williams, Annamaria Szilagyi, Alexander Walls, Kris Siverhus, Hoang Ton, Jason Weinstein, Juliana, Tom Lee, Stephen Michael Alvarez. Check out our Patreon page here: https://www.patreon.com/teded
Views: 1060822 TED-Ed
Les Misérables – Thug Notes Summary & Analysis
 
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Join Wisecrack! ►► http://bit.ly/1y8Veir Visit The Nerdwriter (and SUBSCRIBE!) ►► http://wscrk.com/1IJ9sBN Get first-edition Thug Notes tees ON SALE!! ►► http://bit.ly/1DlMMis From plot debriefs to key motifs, Thug Notes’ Les Miserables Summary & Analysis has you covered with themes, symbols, important quotes, and more. Les Misérables (1862) by Victor Hugo Get Les Miserables here on Amazon ►► http://amzn.to/1UlohLa Twitter: @SparkySweetsPhd Facebook: http://on.fb.me/1Nhiba7 More Thug Notes: Lord of the Flies ►► http://bit.ly/19RhTe0 Of Mice and Men ►► http://bit.ly/1GokKHn The Great Gatsby ►► http://bit.ly/1BoYKqs 8-Bit Philosophy: Is Capitalism Bad For You? ►► http://bit.ly/1NhhX2P What is Real? ►► http://bit.ly/1HHC9g1 What is Marxism? ►► http://bit.ly/1M0dINJ Earthling Cinema: Batman - The Dark Knight ►► http://bit.ly/1buIi1J Pulp Fiction ►► http://bit.ly/18Yjbmr Mean Girls ►► http://bit.ly/1GWjlpy Pop Psych: Mario Goes to Therapy ►► http://bit.ly/1GobKCl Batman Goes to Therapy ►► http://bit.ly/1xhmXCy Santa Goes to Therapy ►► http://bit.ly/1Iwqpuo Shop Thug Notes ►► http://shop.thug-notes.com http://www.thug-notes.com http://www.wisecrack.co © 2015 Wisecrack, Inc.
Views: 429277 Wisecrack
Lord of the Flies: Crash Course Literature 305
 
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This week, John i s talking about one of his least favorite novels, The Lord of the Flies by William Golding. Lord of the Flies is a novel of ideas, and John doesn't agree with the central idea of the novel, which diminished his enjoyment of the book. The central idea of the book is that everyone has evil in their hearts. Which we don't necessarily agree with. That said, it's a good read, and worth reading. *** Crash Course is on Patreon! You can support us directly by signing up at http://www.patreon.com/crashcourse Thanks to the following Patrons for their generous monthly contributions that help keep Crash Course free for everyone forever: Mark, Eric Kitchen, Jessica Wode, Jeffrey Thompson, Steve Marshall, Moritz Schmidt, Robert Kunz, Tim Curwick, Jason A Saslow, SR Foxley, Elliot Beter, Jacob Ash, Christian, Jan Schmid, Jirat, Christy Huddleston, Daniel Baulig, Chris Peters, Anna-Ester Volozh, Ian Dundore, Caleb Weeks, and Sheikh Kori Rahman. -- Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 1035291 CrashCourse
Like Pale Gold - The Great Gatsby Part I: Crash Course English Literature #4
 
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In which John Green explores F. Scott Fitzgerald's novel of the Jazz Age, The Great Gatsby. John introduces you to Nick Carraway, Jay Gatsby, Daisy and Tom Buchanan, and the other characters in the novel, and tries to look beyond the surface story to figure out what this thing is ABOUT. Set in the 1920's against a conflicted backdrop of prohibition and excess, The Great Gatsby takes a close look at the American Dream as it existed in Fitzgerald's time. It turns out, it had a lot to do with money and status, and it still does today. John will cover the rich symbolism of the novel, from the distant green light to the pale gold of wealth and decay. Also, Paris Hilton drops by. Turn on the captions. You'll like it. Follow us! @thecrashcourse @realjohngreen @crashcoursestan @raoulmeyer @thoughtbubbler @saysdanica Like us! http://www.facebook.com/youtubecrashcourse Support CrashCourse on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/crashcourse
Views: 2440393 CrashCourse
What is Deconstruction?
 
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Mr. Nance talks briefly about Deconstruction.
Views: 157100 Tim Nance
The Poetry of Sylvia Plath: Crash Course Literature 216
 
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You can directly support Crash Course at https://www.patreon.com/crashcourse Subscribe for as little as $0 to keep up with everything we're doing. Free is nice, but if you can afford to pay a little every month, it really helps us to continue producing this content. In which John Green teaches you about the poetry of Sylvia Plath. When a lot of people think about Sylvia Plath, they think about her struggles with mental illness and her eventual suicide. Her actual work can get lost in the shuffle a bit, so this video really tries to focus on the poetry. You'll learn about Sylvia Plath's role as a feminist poet, and you'll also learn about her extraordinary ability to recreate the experiences of real life in beautiful and relatable way. Hear John read all of Sylvia Plath's "Lady Lazarus" here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=auP1bHAglU0&feature=youtu.be
Views: 850429 CrashCourse
1984 (Nineteen Eighty-Four) - Thug Notes Summary and Analysis
 
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Yo, check out my new audio series, "Thug Notes GET LIT," now available on Apple Podcasts, Stitcher, Google Play or wherever you get your podcasts. New episodes will be comin’ at you every week. ►► Subscribe and download now! iTunes: http://wscrk.com/ituGetLit Stitcher: http://wscrk.com/stiGetLit Google Play: http://wscrk.com/gpmGetLit Get the Thug Notes BOOK here! ►► http://bit.ly/1HLNbLN Join Wisecrack! ►► http://bit.ly/1y8Veir From plot debriefs to key motifs, Thug Notes’ Nineteen Eighty-Four (1984) Summary & Analysis has you covered with themes, symbols, important quotes, and more. First published in 1949, George Orwell’s novel has been one of the most influential texts of the 20th Century. Get the book here on Amazon ►► http://amzn.to/1H0OvfK Get the book here on iBooks ►► http://apple.co/1R9QtOz Twitter: @SparkySweetsPhd Facebook: http://on.fb.me/1Nhiba7 More Thug Notes: Lord of the Flies ►► http://bit.ly/19RhTe0 Of Mice and Men  ►► http://bit.ly/1GokKHn The Hobbit ►► http://bit.ly/1NhhgGJ 8-Bit Philosophy: Is Capitalism Bad For You? ►► http://bit.ly/1NhhX2P What is Real? ►► http://bit.ly/1HHC9g1 What is Marxism? ►► http://bit.ly/1M0dINJ Earthling Cinema: Batman - The Dark Knight ►► http://bit.ly/1buIi1J Pulp Fiction ►► http://bit.ly/18Yjbmr Mean Girls ►► http://bit.ly/1GWjlpy Pop Psych: Mario Goes to Therapy ►► http://bit.ly/1GobKCl Batman Goes to Therapy ►► http://bit.ly/1xhmXCy Santa Goes to Therapy  ►► http://bit.ly/1Iwqpuo Shop Thug Notes:►► http://shop.thug-notes.com http://www.thug-notes.com http://www.wisecrack.com Check out our Merch!: http://www.wisecrack.co/store
Views: 1507669 Wisecrack
Slavery, Ghosts, and Beloved: Crash Course Literature 214
 
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You can directly support Crash Course at https://www.patreon.com/crashcourse Subscribe for as little as $0 to keep up with everything we're doing. Free is nice, but if you can afford to pay a little every month, it really helps us to continue producing this content. In which John Green teaches you about Beloved by Toni Morrison. I'll warn you up front, this book is something of a downer. That's because it deals with subjects like slavery, the death of a child, a potential haunting, and a bunch of other sad stuff. John will talk about Beloved in relation to slavery, and how that terrible institution affected individuals, families, and all of American culture in the years surrounding the Civil War. We will also not be getting into whether or not Beloved was a ghost, because it really has no bearing on what the book has to say. Also, as usual, spoilers abound, so we recommend you read the book before you watch this video!
Views: 557556 CrashCourse
Ghosts, Murder, and More Murder - Hamlet Part I: Crash Course Literature 203
 
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You can directly support Crash Course at https://www.patreon.com/crashcourse Subscribe for as little as $0 to keep up with everything we're doing. Free is nice, but if you can afford to pay a little every month, it really helps us to continue producing this content. In which John Green teaches you about Hamlet, William Shakespeare's longest and most-performed play. People love Hamlet. The play that is, not necessarily the character. Hamlet is a Tragedy with a capital T (I guess I don't have to point that out, since you can see clearly in the text that the T was capitalized). By Tragedy, I mean virtually everyone dies at the end. John will talk a little bit about the history of the play and the different versions of it that have appeared in the centuries since it was written. You'll also learn about some of the big themes in the play, get a brief plot overview, and the all important connections between Prince Hamlet and Simba, the Lion King. Seriously though, The Lion King is totally just a Hamlet musical with animals instead of people.
Views: 1810944 CrashCourse
Why Bob Dylan Won The Nobel Prize
 
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HELP ME MAKE MORE VIDEOS: http://www.patreon.com/nerdwriter TUMBLR: http://thenerdwriter.tumblr.com TWITTER: https://twitter.com/TheeNerdwriter Email me here: [email protected] SOURCES AND FURTHER READING: Clinton Heylin, "Bob Dylan: The Recording Sessions, 1960-1994" (pg 69-71) https://books.google.com/books?id=c9d62SgEJpkC&pg=PA69&dq=clinton+heylin+all+along+the+watchtower&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjJ1Onju6rNAhVHxGMKHbNPDP4Q6AEIIjAB#v=onepage&q=clinton%20heylin%20all%20along%20the%20watchtower&f=false Albin J. Zak III, "Bob Dylan and Jimi Hendrix: Juxtaposition and Transformation "All along the Watchtower" Journal of the American Musicological Society, Vol. 57, No. 3 (Fall 2004), pp. 599-644 Nicholas Taylor, "Bob Dylan: John Wesley Harding" (via Pop Matters) 2000 http://www.popmatters.com/review/dylanbob-john Robert Johnson Wikipedia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_Johnson Herb Bowie, "All Along The Watchtower" (via Reason To Rock) http://www.reasontorock.com/tracks/watchtower.html D.A. Pennebaker, "Don't Look Now" 1967 http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0061589/ Kees de Graaf, "All Along The Watchtower Analysis (via his website) http://www.keesdegraaf.com/index.php/179/bob-dylans-all-along-the-watchtower-a-lyric-analysis-part-1
Views: 1674524 Nerdwriter1
The Dystopian World of 1984 Explained
 
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George Orwell's novel has been brought up recently. Many terms and facts are used. The world he crafted doses have some similarities, but it in itself is dystopian in its own right. What caused this to happen? What made 1984 such a dark novel that Orwellian is now a term? This is one video to explain. Follow on Twitter: https://twitter.com/AltHistoryHub Music by Myuu: https://www.google.com/webhp?sourceid=chrome-instant&ion=1&espv=2&ie=UTF-8#q=myuu&*
Views: 2380284 AlternateHistoryHub
Why should you read "Don Quixote"? - Ilan Stavans
 
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Check out our Patreon page: https://www.patreon.com/teded Mounting his skinny steed, Don Quixote charges an army of giants. It is his duty to vanquish these behemoths in the name of his beloved lady, Dulcinea. There’s only one problem: the giants are merely windmills. What is it about this tale of the clumsy yet valiant knight that makes it so beloved? Ilan Stavans investigates. Lesson by Ilan Stavans, directed by Avi Ofer. Thank you so much to our patrons for your support! Without you this video would not be possible! Boytsov Ilya, maxi kobi einy, Misaki Sato, Andrew Bosco, Nik Maier, Mark Morris, Tamás Drávai, Adi V, Peter Liu, Leora Allen, Hiroshi Uchiyama, Julie Cummings-Debrot, Gilly, Ka-Hei Law, Maya Toll, Aleksandar Srbinovski, Ricardo Rendon Cepeda, Renhe Ji, Andrés Melo Gámez, Tim Leistikow, Chris, Megan Douglas, Barbara Smalley, Filip Dabrowski, Clair Chen, Vik Nagjee, Karen Goepen-Wee, Della Palacios, Bah Becerra, Marc Bilodeau, Ruby Solorzano, Ivan Tsenov, Claudia Mayfield, Yankai Liu, Duo Xu, Joy Love Om, Gi Nam Lee, Shawn Quichocho, Anika Westburg, Barun Padhy, Devin Harris, Tony Trapuzzano, Jason Weinstein, Kris Siverhus, Alexander Walls, Annamaria Szilagyi, Morgan Williams, Abhijit Kiran Valluri, Mandeep Singh and سلطان الخليفي.
Views: 423743 TED-Ed
The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn Part 1: Crash Course Literature #302
 
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In which John Green teaches you about Mark Twain's The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. This week, we'll talk a little bit about Samuel Langhorne Clemens, who wrote under the name Mark Twain, and how he mined his early life for decades to produce his pretty well-loved body of work. By far the best of Twain's novels, Huckleberry Finn has a lot to say about life in America around the Civil War, and it resonates today with its messages on race, class, and what exactly freedom is. Crash Course is on Patreon! You can support us directly by signing up at http://www.patreon.com/crashcourse Thanks to the following Patrons for their generous monthly contributions that help keep Crash Course free for everyone forever: Mark, Eric Kitchen, Jessica Wode, Jeffrey Thompson, Steve Marshall, Moritz Schmidt, Robert Kunz, Tim Curwick, Jason A Saslow, SR Foxley, Elliot Beter, Jacob Ash, Christian, Jan Schmid, Jirat, Christy Huddleston, Daniel Baulig, Chris Peters, Anna-Ester Volozh, Ian Dundore, Caleb Weeks, and Sheikh Kori Rahman. -- Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 449790 CrashCourse
A Long and Difficult Journey, or  The Odyssey: Crash Course Literature 201
 
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You can directly support Crash Course at https://www.patreon.com/crashcourse Subscribe for as little as $0 to keep up with everything we're doing. Free is nice, but if you can afford to pay a little every month, it really helps us to continue producing this content. In which John Green teaches you about Homer's Odyssey. If it was Homer's If Homer was even real. Anyway, that stuff doesn't really matter. John teaches you the classic, by which I mean classical, epic poem, the Odyssey. The Journey of Odysseus as he made his way home after the conclusion of the Trojan War is the stuff of legend. Literally. John will teach you about the double standard in Greek culture, Odysseus as jerk/hero, ancient PTSD, and cycles of violence. Also, there are no yogurt jokes. So think of that as a gift. Our Subbable lead sponsor this week is Damian Shaw, who wants to thank Bryonie, Stew, Maureen, Peter & Morgan for their support. Our Subbable co-sponsors are: Max Loutzenheiser Katy Cocco
Views: 2431666 CrashCourse
DEEPER Meaning of "You Need to Calm Down" by Taylor Swift | Lyrics & MV Explained
 
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►►Get My Free Magical Songwriting Process for Lyric Writers: http://eepurl.com/dlRMCf Watch Taylor's MV here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Dkk9gvTmCXY ►►Join a community of songwriters & get songwriting advice from me: https://goo.gl/WwXQXk ►►Watch these videos for lyric writing help: https://goo.gl/KoC6Ee ►►Check out camera equipment, books, & games I recommend: https://goo.gl/nRzEuT Let's get to know each other! ►►My Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/cliffordstumme/ ►►My Twitter: https://twitter.com/CliffordStumme ►►My PODCAST: https://goo.gl/9ZTE3f ►►My website: https://www.popsongprofessor.com THE TEAM ►►Thumbnail designer (for most videos): missoyola_art - https://www.instagram.com/missoyola_art/ ►►Video editor (for most videos): Courtney D. - https://twitter.com/courtNayedean DISCLAIMER FOR RECORD LABELS: The content of this educational video is covered by fair use. My work is transformative and adds interpretation and analysis to the original work much as happens when I teach poetry in a university classroom. When I explain songs, I rarely use more the lyrics or short clips of the original song or music video and do not hurt the song’s salability or provide a market substitute. All copyright claims will be disputed and appealed. Please see me as your ally as I use a literary perspective to enable fans to understand and enjoy your wonderful and interesting piece of music.
Views: 25443 The Pop Song Professor
Understanding "The Lottery" by Shirley Jackson
 
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a college prof explains the story's meanings (some, anyway!)
Views: 269459 SixMinuteScholar
The Yellow Wallpaper: Crash Course Literature #407
 
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Today on Crash Course Literature, John Green teaches you about The Yellow Wallpaper, by Charlotte Perkins Gilman. The Yellow Wallpaper tells the story of a woman who is a prisoner in her own home, in the name of caring for her mental health. The narrator stares all day the yellow wallpaper Crash Course is on Patreon! You can support us directly by signing up at http://www.patreon.com/crashcourse Thanks to the following Patrons for their generous monthly contributions that help keep Crash Course free for everyone forever: Mark Brouwer, Nickie Miskell Jr., Jessica Wode, Eric Prestemon, Kathrin Benoit, Tom Trval, Jason Saslow, Nathan Taylor, Divonne Holmes à Court, Brian Thomas Gossett, Khaled El Shalakany, Indika Siriwardena, Robert Kunz, SR Foxley, Sam Ferguson, Yasenia Cruz, Daniel Baulig, Eric Koslow, Caleb Weeks, Tim Curwick, Evren Türkmenoğlu, Alexander Tamas, Justin Zingsheim, D.A. Noe, Shawn Arnold, mark austin, Ruth Perez, Malcolm Callis, Ken Penttinen, Advait Shinde, Cody Carpenter, Annamaria Herrera, William McGraw, Bader AlGhamdi, Vaso, Melissa Briski, Joey Quek, Andrei Krishkevich, Rachel Bright, Alex S, Mayumi Maeda, Kathy & Tim Philip, Montather, Jirat, Eric Kitchen, Moritz Schmidt, Ian Dundore, Chris Peters, Sandra Aft, Steve Marshall -- Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 309371 CrashCourse
A Christmas Carol: Scrooge Key Quotes and Analysis
 
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It's like having your own tutor in your pocket! Interactive lesson providing you with key quotations and teaching you how to analyse quotes in detail, using Scrooge from A Christmas Carol. Visit https://www.educatedminds.co.uk/ for resources and tutoring options Subscribe to my channel: www.youtube.com/c/missc Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/educatedminds/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/MissCRevision Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MissCRevision/ Title: Buddha Artist: Kontekst Buddha by Kontekst https://soundcloud.com/kontekstmusic Creative Commons — Attribution 3.0 Unported— CC BY 3.0 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/b... Music provided by Audio Library https://youtu.be/b6jK2t3lcRs
Imtiaz Dharker: 'Tissue' Mr Bruff Analysis
 
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Buy my revision guides in paperback on Amazon*: Mr Bruff’s Guide to GCSE English Language https://amzn.to/2GvPrTV Mr Bruff’s Guide to GCSE English Literature https://amzn.to/2POt3V7 AQA English Language Paper 1 Practice Papers https://amzn.to/2XJR4lD Mr Bruff’s Guide to ‘Macbeth’ https://amzn.to/2GxYO5p Mr Bruff’s Guide to ‘An Inspector Calls’ https://amzn.to/2GxXJKT Power and Conflict poetry guide (ebook) https://bit.ly/2PS8bw6 Mr Bruff’s Guide to ‘Romeo and Juliet’ https://amzn.to/2GvL0s5 Mr Bruff’s Guide to Grammar: https://amzn.to/2GJCBSj Mr Bruff’s Guide to ‘Jekyll and Hyde’: https://amzn.to/2SYOFQA Mr Bruff’s Guide to ‘The Sign of Four’: https://amzn.to/2Sbs1EN Mr Bruff’s Guide to ‘Much Ado About Nothing’: https://amzn.to/2T6s98L Mr Bruff’s Guide to ‘Great Expectations’: https://amzn.to/2S6OuCY Mr Bruff’s Guide to A’ Level English Literature: https://amzn.to/2T23cef Mr Bruff’s Guide to A’ Level English Language (ebook): https://bit.ly/2LwTuhO Mr Bruff’s Guide to ‘Animal Farm’: https://amzn.to/2GshZh0 Mr Bruff’s Guide to ‘The Tempest’ https://amzn.to/2ScmQ7t Mr Bruff’s Guide to ‘Othello’: https://amzn.to/2QH9fbK Mr Bruff’s Guide to ‘The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night Time: https://amzn.to/2ScMzfY Mr Bruff’s Guide to ‘The Great Gatsby’ https://amzn.to/2QEHEaU Mr Bruff’s Guide to ‘Frankenstein’ https://amzn.to/2Gsj7Bg Mr Bruff’s Guide to ‘Jane Eyre’ https://amzn.to/2Sah46d Mr Bruff’s Guide to ‘The History Boys’ https://amzn.to/2RaSIvX Mr Bruff’s Guide to ‘Spies’ https://amzn.to/2R9f4ho Mr Bruff’s Guide to ‘Pride and Prejudice’ (ebook) https://bit.ly/2A9SWdc *Some of these links are affiliate links, which give me a small commission that helps to support this Youtube channel. The cost remains the same to you, but if you don’t want to use the affiliate link you can simply search for the products yourself on Amazon. More info on Tuitionkit: https://youtu.be/7ecjBwV6Ydg
Views: 191869 mrbruff
Hermeneutics and Interpretation Methods of Prophecy, What Is?
 
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Hermeneutics and Interpretation Methods of Prophecy, What Is? her·me·neu·ticsDictionary result for hermeneutics /ˌhərməˈn(y)o͞odiks/Submit noun the branch of knowledge that deals with interpretation, especially of the Bible or literary texts. Thanks for watching! John 3:16 For God so loved the world, that he gave his only begotten Son, that whosoever believeth in him should not perish, but have everlasting life. 17 For God sent not his Son into the world to condemn the world; but that the world through him might be saved. 18 He that believeth on him is not condemned: but he that believeth not is condemned already, because he hath not believed in the name of the only begotten Son of God. 19 And this is the condemnation, that light is come into the world, and men loved darkness rather than light, because their deeds were evil. 20 For every one that doeth evil hateth the light, neither cometh to the light, lest his deeds should be reproved. 21 But he that doeth truth cometh to the light, that his deeds may be made manifest, that they are wrought in God. ===== Support: http://www.micahgallant.com/support https://www.Tubebuddy.com/enuts Music that isn't free use is used by permission from Andrew Applepie: https://andrewapplepie.bandcamp.com
Classics Summarized: Beowulf
 
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Beowulf! The tale of the baddest Geat to ever Geat. Tolkien said that the Dragon in Beowulf is one of only two *true* dragons in all of literature - the other being Fafnir. The influence of both these dragons is very visible in a lot of our more modern fantasy: for instance, where Beowulf's Dragon inspired Smaug, o chiefest and greatest of calamities, Fafnir inspired C. S. Lewis to include that cursed bracelet thing that turned Eustace into a dragon in Voyage of the Dawn Treader. And I think we all know the badder of those two dragons, so I guess Tolkien - and, by extension, Beowulf - wins this round. Where was I? Right. BEOWULFFFFF PATREON: www.patreon.com/user?u=4664797 MERCH LINKS: Shirts - https://overlysarcasticproducts.threadless.com/designs All the other stuff - http://www.cafepress.com/OverlySarcasticProducts Find us on Twitter @OSPYouTube!
LITERATURE - Virginia Woolf
 
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In her novels and essays, Virginia Woolf captured the intimate moments of the 20th century like no one else. She opens our eyes to the neglected value of daily experiences. Please subscribe here: http://tinyurl.com/o28mut7 If you like our films take a look at our shop (we ship worldwide): http://www.theschooloflife.com/shop/all/ Brought to you by http://www.theschooloflife.com Produced in collaboration with Mad Adam Films http://www.madadamfilms.co.uk #TheSchoolOfLife
Views: 639854 The School of Life
Their Eyes Were Watching God: Crash Course Literature 301
 
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In which John Green reads Zora Neale Hurston's novel, "Their Eyes Were Watching God," and talks to you about it. You'll learn about Zora Neale Hurston's life, and we'll also look at how the interpretations of the book have changed over time. Also, this book will give you a healthy appreciation for the rabies vaccine, and the terrible dilemmas you've avoided thanks to that modern development. *** Crash Course is on Patreon! You can support us directly by signing up at http://www.patreon.com/crashcourse Thanks to the following Patrons for their generous monthly contributions that help keep Crash Course free for everyone forever: Mark, Eric Kitchen, Jessica Wode, Jeffrey Thompson, Steve Marshall, Moritz Schmidt, Robert Kunz, Tim Curwick, Jason A Saslow, SR Foxley, Elliot Beter, Jacob Ash, Christian, Jan Schmid, Jirat, Christy Huddleston, Daniel Baulig, Chris Peters, Anna-Ester Volozh, Ian Dundore, Caleb Weeks, and Sheikh Kori Rahman. -- Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 446681 CrashCourse
Why Don Quixote is the Best Work of Fiction According to 100 Authors
 
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Hernán Sánchez Martínez de Pinillos discussed the life of Miguel de Cervantes and his great literary work, Don Quixote. Speaker Biography: Hernán Sánchez Martínez de Pinillos is a professor in the department of Spanish and Portuguese at the University of Maryland at College Park. For transcript and more information, visit http://www.loc.gov/today/cyberlc/feature_wdesc.php?rec=7774
Views: 26443 LibraryOfCongress
Of Mice and Men - Thug Notes Summary and Analysis
 
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Yo, check out my new audio series, "Thug Notes GET LIT," now available on Apple Podcasts, Stitcher, Google Play or wherever you get your podcasts. New episodes will be comin’ at you every week. ►► Subscribe and download now! iTunes: http://wscrk.com/ituGetLit Stitcher: http://wscrk.com/stiGetLit Google Play: http://wscrk.com/gpmGetLit Get the Thug Notes BOOK here! ►► http://bit.ly/1HLNbLN Join Wisecrack! ►► http://bit.ly/1y8Veir From plot debriefs to key motifs, Thug Notes’ Of Mice and Men Summary & Analysis has you covered with themes, symbols, important quotes, and more. This week’s episode is Of Mice and Men, by John Steinbeck. Buy the book here on Amazon ►► http://amzn.to/1FG0Xlk Buy the book here on iBooks ►► http://apple.co/1d1KJsP Twitter: @SparkSweetsPhd Facebook: http://on.fb.me/1Nhiba7 More Thug Notes: To Kill A Mockingbird ►► http://bit.ly/1Bp5epd The Great Gatsby ►► http://bit.ly/1BoYKqs The Hobbit ►► http://bit.ly/1NhhgGJ 8-Bit Philosophy: Is Capitalism Bad For You? ►► http://bit.ly/1NhhX2P What is Real? ►► http://bit.ly/1HHC9g1 What is Marxism? ►► http://bit.ly/1M0dINJ Earthling Cinema: Batman - The Dark Knight ►► http://bit.ly/1buIi1J Pulp Fiction ►► http://bit.ly/18Yjbmr Mean Girls ►► http://bit.ly/1GWjlpy Pop Psych: Mario Goes to Therapy ►► http://bit.ly/1GobKCl Batman Goes to Therapy ►► http://bit.ly/1xhmXCy Santa Goes to Therapy ►► http://bit.ly/1Iwqpuo Shop Thug Notes:►► http://shop.thug-notes.com http://www.thug-notes.com http://www.wisecrack.co – Check out our Merch!: http://www.wisecrack.co/store
Views: 1002602 Wisecrack
Understanding "Cask of Amontillado"
 
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A college prof explains the story and the creepy narrator Want to cite this video? MLA style: Balcarcel, Rebecca. "Understanding 'Cask of Amontillado'." Online video clip. Sixminutescholar. YouTube, 12 Sep. 2013. Web. DayMonthYearYouWatchedTheVideo.
Views: 178843 SixMinuteScholar
Classics Summarized: Dante's Inferno
 
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BREAKING NEWS: Overly Sarcastic Productions has a twitter now! Check it out: https://www.twitter.com/OSPyoutube/ PURGATORIO (part 2 of the Divine Comedy) HERE: http://youtu.be/8-ImAfevCOM I'm back, baby! For this week's venture into literature, we take a broad look at The Inferno. Hold onto your butts. PATREON: www.patreon.com/user?u=4664797 MERCH LINKS: Shirts - https://overlysarcasticproducts.threadless.com/designs All the other stuff - http://www.cafepress.com/OverlySarcasticProducts Find us on Twitter @OSPYouTube!