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What is ORAL INTERPRETATION? What does ORAL INTERPRETATION mean? ORAL INTERPRETATION meaning
 
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What is ORAL INTERPRETATION? What does ORAL INTERPRETATION mean? ORAL INTERPRETATION meaning - ORAL INTERPRETATION definition - ORAL INTERPRETATION explanation. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6UuCPh7GrXznZi0Hz2YQnQ Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. Oral Interpretation is a dramatic art, also commonly called "interpretive reading" and "dramatic reading", though these terms are more conservative and restrictive. In certain applications, oral interpretation is also a theatre art – as in reader's theatre, in which a work of literature is performed with manuscripts in hand or, more traditionally, using stools and music stands; and especially chamber theatre, which dispenses with manuscripts and uses what may be described as essentialist costuming and stage lighting, and suggestive scenery. The term is succinctly defined by Paul Campbell (The Speaking and Speakers of Literature; Dickinson, 1967) as the "oralization of literature"; or more eloquently, if less intelligibly, by Charlotte Lee and Timothy Gura (Oral Interpretation; Houghton-Mifflin, 1997) as "the art of communicating to an audience a work of literary art in its intellectual, emotional, and aesthetic entirety". Historically essential to Charlotte Lee's definition of oral interpretation is the fact the performer is "reading from a manuscript". This perspective, once the majority view, has long since become the minority opinion on the question; so that whether one is or is not reading from a manuscript, the art retains the same name. Voice and movement technique is opsis ("spectacle") while oral interpretation is, conceptually, melopoiia ("music technique"). Because oral interpretation is an essential dramatic element in all performance art (even dance, in which the oral element is most typically a silent element), all actors, singers, storytellers, etc., are interpreters – but not all interpreters are necessarily actors, or singers, or storytellers, and so on. When, for example, the writer David Sedaris reads one of his stories on stage, or when Leonard Cohen performs one of his lyric poems, they are both engaged in the art of oral interpretation. But Sedaris is no actor, and even Cohen himself would say that he is no singer. In the United States, there is a historic and purely academic argument as to whether oral interpretation and drama/theatre performance are different names for the same thing or whether they are completely different art forms. This argument is almost exclusively found at colleges and universities whose theatre programs evolved in departments historically or currently called "English and Speech", "Speech and Dramatic Arts" or "Communication and Theatre Arts". The argument is rarely heard in theatre programs that did not evolve out of English and/or Speech Communication departments, such as those associated with schools/colleges of music. In high schools across the United States, Oral Interpretation is a very highly valued competition event, particularly in the mid-western states, such as Nebraska, Iowa, and South Dakota. Students select a work of literature, make a cutting of the literature to fit a time limit of 10 minutes, and perform it in several rounds at tournaments across their state. The piece must be from a published, worthwhile piece of literature, with the exception of Readers Theatre. The categories of said event are as follows: 1. Serious Prose—Interpretation of a work of prose literature with a serious basis. Single-person event. 2. Humorous Interp—Interpretation of any published work of comedic literature. Single-person event 3. Dramatic Interp—Interpretation of a dramatic play with a serious nature. Single-person event. 4. Poetry—Interpretation of a published work of poetry. Single-person event. 5. Non-Original Oratory—Interpretation of an oratorical speech that has been previously delivered. Single-person event. 6. Duo Interpretation—Interpretation of a piece of literature where two Interpers are involved. The pair may not look at nor touch each other, and must deliver the piece in the direction of the audience. This category has the most stringent rules. 7. Readers Theatre—A theatrical interpretation performance where 3-6 people participate. They may perform an original piece, or they may take a cutting from a work of literature. This category has the least amount of rules.
Views: 437 The Audiopedia
How to Analyze Literature
 
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Have a literary analysis paper coming up? This is one of the trickier types of essays for a lot of college students. Watch this video to learn a strategy for approaching literary analysis and to see an example.
How and Why We Read: Crash Course English Literature #1
 
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In which John Green kicks off the Crash Course Literature mini series with a reasonable set of questions. Why do we read? What's the point of reading critically. John will argue that reading is about effectively communicating with other people. Unlike a direct communication though, the writer has to communicate with a stranger, through time and space, with only "dry dead words on a page." So how's that going to work? Find out with Crash Course Literature! Also, readers are empowered during the open letter, so that's pretty cool. The Reading List! Romeo and Juliet by William Shakespeare: http://dft.ba/-shakespearerj The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald: http://dft.ba/-fitzgeraldgg Catcher in the Rye: http://dft.ba/-catcher Complete Poems of Emily Dickinson: http://dft.ba/-dickinson Some of these are available from gutenberg.org as free ebooks. You should check that out. Follow us! @thecrashcourse @realjohngreen @raoulmeyer @crashcoursestan @thoughtbubbler @saysdanica Support CrashCourse on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/crashcourse
Views: 3127328 CrashCourse
What is AESTHETIC INTERPRETATION? What does AESTHETIC INTERPRETATION mean?
 
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What is AESTHETIC INTERPRETATION? What does AESTHETIC INTERPRETATION mean? AESTHETIC INTERPRETATION meaning - AESTHETIC INTERPRETATION definition - AESTHETIC INTERPRETATION explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. An interpretation in philosophy of art, is an explanation of the meaning of some work of art. An interpretation expresses an understanding of a work of art, a poem, performance, or piece of literature. Readers may approach reading a text from different starting points. A student assigned to interpret a poem for class comes at reading differently from someone on the beach reading a novel for escapist pleasure. "Interpretation" implies the conscious task of making sense out of a piece of writing that may not be clear at first glance or that may reward deeper reading even if it at first appears perfectly clear. The beach reader will probably not need to interpret what she or he reads, but the student will. Professor Louise Rosenblatt, a specialist in the study of the reading process, distinguished between reading "stances" occupying the opposite ends of a spectrum. "Aesthetic reading" differs from "efferent" in that the former describes a reader coming to the text expecting to devote attention to the words themselves, to take pleasure in their sounds, images, connotations, etc. "Efferent reading," on the other hand, describes someone "reading for knowledge, for information, or for the conclusion to an argument, or maybe for directions as to action, as in a recipe . . . , reading for what going to carry away afterwards. I term this efferent reading." That is what "efferent" means, leading or conducting away from something, in this case information from a text. On this view, poems and stories do not offer the reader a message to carry away, but a pleasure in which to participate actively—aesthetically. There are many different theories of interpretation. On the one hand, there may be innumerable interpretations for any given piece of art, any one of which may be considered valid. However, it may also be claimed that there really is only one valid interpretation for any given piece of art. The aesthetic theory that says people may approach art with different but equally valid aims is called "pluralism." But the aim of some of interpretations is such that they claim to be true or false. A "relativistic" kind of claim—between "All readings are equally good" and "Only one reading is correct"—holds that readings that tie together more details of the text and that gain approval of practiced readers are better than ones that do not. One kind of relativistic interpretation is called "formal," referring to the "form" or shape of patterns in the words of a text, especially a poem or song. Pointing to the rhymes at the ends of lines is an objective set of resemblances in a poem. A reader of Edgar Allan Poe's "The Raven" cannot help but hear the repetition of "nevermore" as a formal element of Poe's poem. Less obvious and a bit subjective would be an interpreter's pointing to the resemblance tying together all the mentions of weariness, napping, dreaming, and the drug nepenthe. Some students of the reading process advocate that a reader should attempt to identify what the artist is trying to accomplish and interpret the art in terms of whether or not the artist has succeeded. Professor E. D. Hirsch wrote two books arguing that "the author's intention must be the ultimate determiner of meaning."E. D. Hirsch In this controversial view, there is a single correct interpretation consistent with the artists intention for any given art work.
Views: 478 The Audiopedia
What is INTERPRETATION? What does INTERPRETATION mean? How to pronounce INTERPRETATION?
 
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What is INTERPRETATION? What does INTERPRETATION mean? INTERPRETATION meaning - INTERPRETATION definition - INTERPRETATION explanation - How to pronounce INTERPRETATION? Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license.
Views: 3646 The Audiopedia
Is There Truth in Interpretation? Law, Literature and History
 
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Ronald Dworkin, professor of jurisprudence at University College London and the New York University School of Law, delivers the inaugural Frederic R. and Molly S. Kellogg Biennial Lecture on Jurisprudence in the Coolidge Auditorium of the Library of Congress. Speaker Biography: Born in Worcester, Mass., Ronald Dworkin was educated at Harvard University and Magdalen College, Oxford, where he was a Rhodes Scholar and a student of prominent British lawyer and academic Sir Rupert Cross. Dworkin attended Harvard Law School and subsequently clerked for Judge Learned Hand of the United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit. A former professor of jurisprudence at the University of Oxford, Dworkin is widely known as one of the foremost American legal philosophers. He is the author of many articles in philosophical and legal journals and has written numerous books, as well as articles on legal and political topics in the New York Review of Books. In 2007, Dworkin was awarded the Holberg Memorial Prize in the Humanities by the Kingdom of Norway.
Views: 108658 LibraryOfCongress
What is Deconstruction?
 
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Mr. Nance talks briefly about Deconstruction.
Views: 133633 Tim Nance
What is Historical Criticism?
 
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Mr. Nance briefly describes Historicism.
Views: 36035 Tim Nance
Studying Translation.
 
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The story of what studying translation at Leiden University for my MA was like. Studying English at Leiden University. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DLobAD6KDZg Follow what I'm reading. http://www.goodreads.com/booksandquills My face on the MySpace http://www.twitter.com/booksandquills http://booksandquills.blogspot.com http://booksandquills.tumblr.com Second channel. http://www.youtube.com/inturretandtree http://inturretandtree.tumblr.com Beauty channel with Marionhoney. http://www.youtube.com/derpinamode http://derpinamode.tumblr.com Instagram | booksandquills
Views: 54124 booksandquills
LITERATURE - George Orwell
 
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George Orwell is the most famous English language writer of the 20th century, the author of Animal Farm and 1984. What was he trying to tell us and what is his genius? If you like our films, take a look at our shop (we ship worldwide): https://goo.gl/vSiVRh Join our exclusive mailing list: http://bit.ly/2e0TQNJ Or visit us in person at our London HQ https://goo.gl/90vzcY FURTHER READING You can read more on our great thinkers at our blog: TheBookofLife.org at this link: https://goo.gl/Ne28ro MORE SCHOOL OF LIFE Our website has classes, articles and products to help you think and grow: https://goo.gl/7w22rM Watch more films on Literature and our Curriculum in our playlist: http://bit.ly/TSOLcapitalism Do you speak a different language to English? Did you know you can submit Subtitles on all of our videos on YouTube? For instructions how to do this click here: https://goo.gl/rU7lhw SOCIAL MEDIA Feel free to follow us at the links below: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/theschooloflifelondon/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/TheSchoolOfLife Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/theschooloflifelondon/ CREDITS Produced in collaboration with: Mike Booth http://www.youtube.com/somegreybloke #TheSchoolOfLife
Views: 856627 The School of Life
What makes something "Kafkaesque"? - Noah Tavlin
 
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View full lesson: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/what-makes-something-kafkaesque-noah-tavlin The term Kafkaesque has entered the vernacular to describe unnecessarily complicated and frustrating experiences, especially with bureaucracy. But does standing in a long line to fill out confusing paperwork really capture the richness of Kafka’s vision? Beyond the word’s casual use, what makes something "Kafkaesque"? Noah Tavlin explains. Lesson by Noah Tavlin, animation by TED-Ed.
Views: 3182620 TED-Ed
What is THEMATIC INTERPRETATION? What does THEMATIC INTERPRETATION mean?
 
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What is THEMATIC INTERPRETATION? What does THEMATIC INTERPRETATION mean? THEMATIC INTERPRETATION meaning - THEMATIC INTERPRETATION definition - THEMATIC INTERPRETATION explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. Thematic interpretation is an approach to heritage interpretation originally advocated by Professor William J. Lewis (University of Vermont) and subsequently developed by Professor Sam H. Ham (University of Idaho). In the thematic approach, an interpreter relies on a central theme (i.e., a major point or message) to guide development of a communication activity or device. In presenting the activity or device, the thematic interpreter develops the theme in such a way that it will be highly relevant to an audience. According to studies, presenting a strongly relevant theme greatly increases the likelihood an interpreter will succeed in provoking an audience to think about theme-related issues. Beginning in the early 2000s, the thematic approach has been adopted widely in persuasive communication campaigns aimed at impacting environmental behaviors, especially those related to energy and water consumption, and in occupational safety and risk communication programs. In the broader fields of sustainable development and risk communication, the term thematic communication (rather than thematic "interpretation") is often used. The two approaches, however, are identical, and both are linked largely to Ham's (1992) book, Environmental Interpretation. The thematic approach to interpretation was popularized in the book Environmental Interpretation (1992) by Dr. Sam H. Ham (University of Idaho) which has become standard reading for many students of interpretation and interpretive tour guiding. Prior to Dr. Ham's book, two additional contributors to the field of Interpretation are its founder, Freeman Tilden and his book, Interpreting Our Heritage (1957) and Dr. Grant W. Sharpe (University of Washington) and his work, Interpreting the Environment. Ham formally presented the thematic approach for the first time in his 1992 book, wherein he outlined the "EROT" (Enjoyable, Relevant, Organized, Thematic) framework. Drawing heavily on persuasive communication research, Ham refined the EROT framework in the early 2000s and renamed it the TORE model of thematic interpretation. The most detailed presentation of the TORE model is in Interpretation-- Making a difference on purpose which Ham published in 2013. There are obvious parallels between Ham's view of thematic interpretation and those of Freeman Tilden who is widely considered the founder of the field of interpretation. The most important parallel is that both see interpretation as a process aimed at provoking audiences to do their own thinking and thereby develop their own subjective understanding of the world. This is in contrast to the view that interpretation instructs audiences to know or accept the interpreter's understanding of things. Both Tilden and Ham appear to be strongly influenced by the views of constructivist learning theorists--with Tilden influenced by John Dewey, and Ham influenced by cognitive constructivist Jean Piaget and social constructivist Lev Vygotsky. In the spirit of constructivist learning theory, Dewey, Piaget, and Vygotsky saw learning as the result of knowledge that is created inside a learner's own head, rather than being "put" there by an educator. Both Tilden, and later, Ham, advocated a very similar view in the field of interpretation. According to both of them, when interpretation is strongly relevant to its audience, it is likely to provoke thinking and elaboration. In everyday reality, the practice of thematic interpretation involves theme-based communication by interpretive naturalists, zoo and museum educators, guides, docents, park rangers, and other communicators in natural and cultural settings. Typically interpreters are required to present complex and potentially dry subject matter to non-technical voluntary audiences (often consisting of tourists) in an interesting and engaging way. The thematic approach can involve any method that increases the relevance of an interpreter's theme to an audience, for example, comparisons, analogies and stories that link unfamiliar things to the things an audience already cares about.
Views: 1057 The Audiopedia
Elements of a Short Story
 
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7th grade language arts lesson
Views: 376535 robinb66
What Exactly is Translation and Interpretation?
 
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A short presentation on the difference between translation and interpretation, what the different skill sets are, and where a translator or interpreter can work at.
Views: 1780 Sofia Deustua Renom
LITERATURE: Franz Kafka
 
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Franz Kafka is a guide to some very dark feelings most of us know well concerned with powerlessness, self-disgust and anxiety. This literary genius turned the stuff of nightmares into redemptive, consoling art. If you like our films take a look at our shop (we ship worldwide): https://www.theschooloflife.com/shop/ Brought to you by http://www.theschooloflife.com Produced in collaboration with Mike Booth http://youtube.com/somegreybloke and Carla Pereira http://carlapereiradocampo.blogspot.co.uk/ #TheSchoolOfLife
Views: 966223 The School of Life
Like Pale Gold - The Great Gatsby Part I: Crash Course English Literature #4
 
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In which John Green explores F. Scott Fitzgerald's novel of the Jazz Age, The Great Gatsby. John introduces you to Nick Carraway, Jay Gatsby, Daisy and Tom Buchanan, and the other characters in the novel, and tries to look beyond the surface story to figure out what this thing is ABOUT. Set in the 1920's against a conflicted backdrop of prohibition and excess, The Great Gatsby takes a close look at the American Dream as it existed in Fitzgerald's time. It turns out, it had a lot to do with money and status, and it still does today. John will cover the rich symbolism of the novel, from the distant green light to the pale gold of wealth and decay. Also, Paris Hilton drops by. Turn on the captions. You'll like it. Follow us! @thecrashcourse @realjohngreen @crashcoursestan @raoulmeyer @thoughtbubbler @saysdanica Like us! http://www.facebook.com/youtubecrashcourse Support CrashCourse on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/crashcourse
Views: 2267276 CrashCourse
Hermeneutics: A Very Short Introduction
 
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Author Jens Zimmermann tells us the top 10 things you should know about Hermeneutics. https://global.oup.com/academic/produ... Jens Zimmermann is Professor of Humanities and Canada Research Chair for Interpretation, Religion and Culture at Trinity Western University, Canada. As well as speaking on the importance of hermeneutics and religion to lay audiences and graduate students, he has published books on theological hermeneutics in both English and German and has written articles on hermeneutics in academic journals. © Oxford University Press
Ghosts, Murder, and More Murder - Hamlet Part I: Crash Course Literature 203
 
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You can directly support Crash Course at https://www.patreon.com/crashcourse Subscribe for as little as $0 to keep up with everything we're doing. Free is nice, but if you can afford to pay a little every month, it really helps us to continue producing this content. In which John Green teaches you about Hamlet, William Shakespeare's longest and most-performed play. People love Hamlet. The play that is, not necessarily the character. Hamlet is a Tragedy with a capital T (I guess I don't have to point that out, since you can see clearly in the text that the T was capitalized). By Tragedy, I mean virtually everyone dies at the end. John will talk a little bit about the history of the play and the different versions of it that have appeared in the centuries since it was written. You'll also learn about some of the big themes in the play, get a brief plot overview, and the all important connections between Prince Hamlet and Simba, the Lion King. Seriously though, The Lion King is totally just a Hamlet musical with animals instead of people.
Views: 1702718 CrashCourse
LITERATURE - Goethe
 
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Goethe is one of the great minds of European civilisation, though his work is largely unknown outside of the German speaking countries. He deserves our renewed attention. Please subscribe here: http://tinyurl.com/o28mut7 If you like our films take a look at our shop (we ship worldwide): http://theschooloflife.com/shop/all/ Brought to you by http://theschooloflife.com Produced in collaboration with Mad Adam Films http://madadamfilms.co.uk #TheSchoolOfLife
Views: 723322 The School of Life
Lord of the Flies: Crash Course Literature 305
 
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This week, John i s talking about one of his least favorite novels, The Lord of the Flies by William Golding. Lord of the Flies is a novel of ideas, and John doesn't agree with the central idea of the novel, which diminished his enjoyment of the book. The central idea of the book is that everyone has evil in their hearts. Which we don't necessarily agree with. That said, it's a good read, and worth reading. *** Crash Course is on Patreon! You can support us directly by signing up at http://www.patreon.com/crashcourse Thanks to the following Patrons for their generous monthly contributions that help keep Crash Course free for everyone forever: Mark, Eric Kitchen, Jessica Wode, Jeffrey Thompson, Steve Marshall, Moritz Schmidt, Robert Kunz, Tim Curwick, Jason A Saslow, SR Foxley, Elliot Beter, Jacob Ash, Christian, Jan Schmid, Jirat, Christy Huddleston, Daniel Baulig, Chris Peters, Anna-Ester Volozh, Ian Dundore, Caleb Weeks, and Sheikh Kori Rahman. -- Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 935750 CrashCourse
3. Ways In and Out of the Hermeneutic Circle
 
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Introduction to Theory of Literature (ENGL 300) In this lecture, Professor Paul Fry examines acts of reading and interpretation by way of the theory of hermeneutics. The origins of hermeneutic thought are traced through Western literature. The mechanics of hermeneutics, including the idea of a hermeneutic circle, are explored in detail with reference to the works of Hans-George Gadamer, Martin Heidegger, and E. D. Hirsch. Particular attention is paid to the emergence of concepts of "historicism" and "historicality" and their relation to hermeneutic theory. 00:00 - Chapter 1. The History of Hermeneutics 10:32 - Chapter 2. The Hermeneutic Circle 20:37 - Chapter 3. On Prejudice 23:45 - Chapter 4. Historicism and "Historicality" 27:48 - Chapter 5. Gadamer's Debt to Heidegger 33:21 - Chapter 6. Prejudice and Tradition 37:20 - Chapter 7. E. D. Hirsch Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses This course was recorded in Spring 2009.
Views: 181250 YaleCourses
Why Bob Dylan Won The Nobel Prize
 
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HELP ME MAKE MORE VIDEOS: http://www.patreon.com/nerdwriter TUMBLR: http://thenerdwriter.tumblr.com TWITTER: https://twitter.com/TheeNerdwriter Email me here: [email protected] SOURCES AND FURTHER READING: Clinton Heylin, "Bob Dylan: The Recording Sessions, 1960-1994" (pg 69-71) https://books.google.com/books?id=c9d62SgEJpkC&pg=PA69&dq=clinton+heylin+all+along+the+watchtower&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjJ1Onju6rNAhVHxGMKHbNPDP4Q6AEIIjAB#v=onepage&q=clinton%20heylin%20all%20along%20the%20watchtower&f=false Albin J. Zak III, "Bob Dylan and Jimi Hendrix: Juxtaposition and Transformation "All along the Watchtower" Journal of the American Musicological Society, Vol. 57, No. 3 (Fall 2004), pp. 599-644 Nicholas Taylor, "Bob Dylan: John Wesley Harding" (via Pop Matters) 2000 http://www.popmatters.com/review/dylanbob-john Robert Johnson Wikipedia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_Johnson Herb Bowie, "All Along The Watchtower" (via Reason To Rock) http://www.reasontorock.com/tracks/watchtower.html D.A. Pennebaker, "Don't Look Now" 1967 http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0061589/ Kees de Graaf, "All Along The Watchtower Analysis (via his website) http://www.keesdegraaf.com/index.php/179/bob-dylans-all-along-the-watchtower-a-lyric-analysis-part-1
Views: 1561817 Nerdwriter1
Reader, it's Jane Eyre - Crash Course Literature 207
 
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You can directly support Crash Course at https://www.patreon.com/crashcourse Subscribe for as little as $0 to keep up with everything we're doing. Free is nice, but if you can afford to pay a little every month, it really helps us to continue producing this content. In which John Green teaches you about Charlotte Brontë's classic coming of age novel, Jane Eyre. Look, we don't like to make judgement values here, but Jane Eyre is awesome. By which we mean the book is great, and the character is amazing. When Jane Eyre was published in 1847, it was a huge hit. It really hit the controversial balance beautifully, being edgy enough to make news, but still mainstream enough to be widely popular. It was sort of like the Fight Club of it's day, but not quite as testosterone-fueled. You'll learn a little about the story, learn about Jane as a feminist heroine, and even get some critical analysis on how Bertha might just be a dark mirror that acts out Jane's emotional reactions. Also, there's a new Crash Course US History poster! Have a look at it here: http://dftba.com/product/1dj/CrashCourse-US-History-Poster
Views: 911749 CrashCourse
A Long and Difficult Journey, or  The Odyssey: Crash Course Literature 201
 
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You can directly support Crash Course at https://www.patreon.com/crashcourse Subscribe for as little as $0 to keep up with everything we're doing. Free is nice, but if you can afford to pay a little every month, it really helps us to continue producing this content. In which John Green teaches you about Homer's Odyssey. If it was Homer's If Homer was even real. Anyway, that stuff doesn't really matter. John teaches you the classic, by which I mean classical, epic poem, the Odyssey. The Journey of Odysseus as he made his way home after the conclusion of the Trojan War is the stuff of legend. Literally. John will teach you about the double standard in Greek culture, Odysseus as jerk/hero, ancient PTSD, and cycles of violence. Also, there are no yogurt jokes. So think of that as a gift. Our Subbable lead sponsor this week is Damian Shaw, who wants to thank Bryonie, Stew, Maureen, Peter & Morgan for their support. Our Subbable co-sponsors are: Max Loutzenheiser Katy Cocco
Views: 2278001 CrashCourse
What Is Myth? Crash Course World Mythology #1
 
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Welcome to Crash Course World Mythology, our latest adventure (and this series may be literally adventurous) in education. Over the next 40 episodes or so, we and Mike Rugnetta are going to learn about the world by looking at the foundational stories of a bunch of different cultural traditions. We’re going to look at the ways that people’s stories define them, and the ways they shape their culture. We’re going to learn about gods, goddesses, heroes, and tricksters, and a lot more. We’re going to walk the blurry line between myth and religion, and we’re going to like it. Crash Course is made with Adobe Creative Cloud. You can get a free trial of all the tools we use here: http://www.adobe.com/creativecloud/catalog/desktop.html?promoid=NQCJRCJ2&mv=other Crash Course is on Patreon! You can support us directly by signing up at http://www.patreon.com/crashcourse Thanks to the following Patrons for their generous monthly contributions that help keep Crash Course free for everyone forever: Mark, Kathrin Janßen, Ken Penttinen, Yana Leonor, Advait Shinde, Meshal Alshammari, Robert Kunz, Cody Carpenter, Annamaria Herrera, Nathan Taylor, Andrea Bareis, Eric Prestemon, Les Aker, William McGraw, Justin Zingsheim, Bader AlGhamdi, Kyle Anderson, Vaso, Melissa Briski, Joey Quek, Andrei Krishkevich, Rachel Bright, Rizwan Kassim, Alex S, Mayumi Maeda, Kathy & Tim Philip, Jessica Wode, Brian Thomas Gossett, Montather, Caleb Weeks, Jirat, Tim Curwick, Eric Kitchen, Daniel Baulig, Moritz Schmidt, Ian Dundore, Chris Peters, Eric Knight, Sandra Aft, SR Foxley, Jason A Saslow, Steve Marshall, Jeffrey Thompson -- Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 1287351 CrashCourse
Classics Summarized: Dante's Inferno
 
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BREAKING NEWS: Overly Sarcastic Productions has a twitter now! Check it out: https://www.twitter.com/OSPyoutube/ PURGATORIO (part 2 of the Divine Comedy) HERE: http://youtu.be/8-ImAfevCOM I'm back, baby! For this week's venture into literature, we take a broad look at The Inferno. Hold onto your butts. PATREON: www.patreon.com/user?u=4664797 MERCH LINKS: Shirts - https://overlysarcasticproducts.threadless.com/designs All the other stuff - http://www.cafepress.com/OverlySarcasticProducts Find us on Twitter @OSPYouTube!
What HARRY POTTER Means to Me
 
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TIMECODES LINKED BELOW. Strap in, this is gonna be a long one! Become an HP1 supporter on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/user?u=1017531 Be sure to follow me on Twitter at @blockbustedpod! Listen to Blockbusted on iTunes: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/blockbusted/id1028775062 Check out my Letterboxd profile here: https://letterboxd.com/blockbustedpod/ This is my review/critique/analysis of the film and not an upload of the film in its entirety. The clips used are heavily edited and most of them narrated over top of, showing only amounts that are necessary for me to be able to make my points about the film. My review is for purposes of commentary and criticism and is considered Fair Use by both YouTube and Federal Copyright Law. My usage of the clips does not legally require the copyright holder's permission and I have every legal right to upload the heavily edited content. For further proof and information on Fair Use, please refer to: http://www.copyright.gov/legislation/dmca.pdf and additionally http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S521VcjhvMA&t=28m14s Thank you for taking the time to verify the clips to see that my usage does not violate copyright. ....... HP1 Art by 97LegoManiac: https://www.youtube.com/user/97legomaniac
Views: 135611 HoustonProductions1
Don't Reanimate Corpses! Frankenstein Part 1: Crash Course Literature 205
 
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In which John Green teaches you about Mary Shelley's novel, Frankenstein. Sure, you know Frankenstein the cultural phenomenon, but how much do you know about the novel that started it all? You'll learn about the Romantic movement in English lit, of which Frankenstein is a GREAT example, and you'll learn that Frankenstein might just be the first SciFi novel. Once again, literature comes down to just what it means to be human. John will review the plot, and take you through a couple of different critical readings of the novel, and will discuss the final disposition of Percy Shelley's heart.
Views: 1210588 CrashCourse
Pride and Prejudice Part 1: Crash Course Literature #411
 
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In which a series about literature, which is wanting of an episode on Jane Austen, gets the first of two episodes. It's Pride and Prejudice, everybody! John Green talks about Pride and Prejudice as a product of Regency England, gives you a short biographical look at author Jane Austen, and familiarizes you with the web of human connections this book spins. Crash Course is on Patreon! You can support us directly by signing up at http://www.patreon.com/crashcourse Thanks to the following Patrons for their generous monthly contributions that help keep Crash Course free for everyone forever: Mark Brouwer, Nickie Miskell Jr., Jessica Wode, Eric Prestemon, Kathrin Benoit, Tom Trval, Jason Saslow, Nathan Taylor, Divonne Holmes à Court, Brian Thomas Gossett, Khaled El Shalakany, Indika Siriwardena, Robert Kunz, SR Foxley, Sam Ferguson, Yasenia Cruz, Daniel Baulig, Eric Koslow, Caleb Weeks, Tim Curwick, Evren Türkmenoğlu, Alexander Tamas, Justin Zingsheim, D.A. Noe, Shawn Arnold, mark austin, Ruth Perez, Malcolm Callis, Ken Penttinen, Advait Shinde, Cody Carpenter, Annamaria Herrera, William McGraw, Bader AlGhamdi, Vaso, Melissa Briski, Joey Quek, Andrei Krishkevich, Rachel Bright, Alex S, Mayumi Maeda, Kathy & Tim Philip, Montather, Jirat, Eric Kitchen, Moritz Schmidt, Ian Dundore, Chris Peters, Sandra Aft, Steve Marshall -- Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 250735 CrashCourse
Skeptical Journal Club: How To Read A Medical Study
 
01:23:18
For best viewing experience, please download the following .pdf files of the studies discussed in Dr. Cmar's talk: http://files.ncas.org/2014-12-02/NCAS-mefloquine-HIV-plos-2014.pdf http://files.ncas.org/2014-12-02/NCAS-homeopathy-PMS-2014.pdf One of the most important aspects of being a healthy skeptic is knowing that just because a scientific study was done on a topic does not mean the study was done well, or that the conclusion the authors reach is supported by what they actually did. But when someone states that a particular study has major flaws or was well-done, what precisely does that mean? In this video, Dr. John Cmar analyzes two different journal articles in detail, focusing on the good, the bad, and the ugly of how studies are done and interpreted. John Cmar, MD, has been long enthralled with horrible infections that could spell doom for humankind, as well as sanity and skepticism in the practice of medicine. He is currently an Instructor of Medicine at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, and the Assistant Director of the Division of Infectious Diseases at Sinai Hospital of Baltimore. He is the lead physician in Sinai's Ryan White initiative, which provides medical care and social assistance to patients with HIV infection who are without medical insurance. In his role as Program Director for the Internal Medicine residency program at Sinai, he teaches an annual course series in Evidence-Based Medicine, among many other duties. He also does Infectious Diseases outreach in Baltimore television and print media, and is the guest-in-residence on the monthly Midday on Health show with Dan Rodricks on 88.1 WYPR radio in Baltimore. John is a science fiction and fantasy fan, avid gamer, and podcast enthusiast. He currently blogs and podcasts on skeptical, medical, and geeky topics as Saint Nickanuck of the Tundra at johncmar.com
Views: 17970 NCASVideo
The Lottery, by Shirley Jackson (Analysis & Interpretation)
 
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Nick Courtright is the Executive Editor of Atmosphere Press, an author-friendly publisher, and an acclaimed English professor. Learn more at atmospherepress.com, and nickcourtright.com!
Views: 59016 Atmosphere Press
1984 by George Orwell, Part 1: Crash Course Literature 401
 
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In which John Green returns for a dystopian new season of Crash Course Literature! We're starting with George Orwell's classic look at the totalitarian state that could be in post-war England. Winston Smith is under the eye of Big Brother, and making us think about surveillance, the role of government, and how language can play a huge part in repressive regimes. Crash Course is made with Adobe Creative Cloud. Get a free trial: www.adobe.com/creativecloud/catalog/desktop.html Crash Course is on Patreon! You can support us directly by signing up at http://www.patreon.com/crashcourse Thanks to the following Patrons for their generous monthly contributions that help keep Crash Course free for everyone forever: Mark Brouwer, Divonne Holmes à Court, Brian Thomas Gossett, Khaled El Shalakany, Indika Siriwardena, Robert Kunz, SR Foxley, Sam Ferguson, Yasenia Cruz, Daniel Baulig, Eric Koslow, Caleb Weeks, Tim Curwick, Jessica Wode, Cami Wilson, Eric Prestemon, Evren Türkmenoğlu, Alexander Tamas, Justin Zingsheim, D.A. Noe, Shawn Arnold, Tom Trval, mark austin, Ruth Perez, Malcolm Callis, Kathrin Janßen, Ken Penttinen, Advait Shinde, Cody Carpenter, Annamaria Herrera, Nathan Taylor, William McGraw, Bader AlGhamdi, Vaso, Melissa Briski, Joey Quek, Andrei Krishkevich, Rachel Bright, Alex S, Mayumi Maeda, Kathy & Tim Philip, Montather, Jirat, Eric Kitchen, Moritz Schmidt, Ian Dundore, Chris Peters, Sandra Aft, Jason A Saslow, Steve Marshall -- Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 787979 CrashCourse
Language, Voice, and Holden Caulfield: The Catcher in the Rye Part 1
 
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In which John Green examines JD Salinger's novel The Catcher in the Rye. John pulls out the old school literary criticism by examining the text itself rather than paying attention to the biographical or historical context of the novel (that's for next week). Listen, words matter. The Catcher in the Rye has managed to endure without a movie adaptation because a lot of its quality arises from the book's language. Find out how Holden's voice, his language, and his narrative technique combine to make the novel work. Also, Thought Bubble gives us a quick rundown of the plot, in which Ikea Monkey may or may not appear. Support CrashCourse on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/crashcourse
Views: 1459649 CrashCourse
Top 10 Notes: Animal Farm
 
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Its original title was "Animal Farm: A Fairy Story." Welcome to WatchMojo.com and in this installment of Mojo Notes, we'll be exploring 10 things you should know about George Orwell's "Animal Farm." Mojo Notes is an ongoing bonus feature that will help you catch up with classic literature. Why read when you can watch! If you want to suggest an idea for a WatchMojo video, check out our interactive Suggestion Tool at http://www.WatchMojo.com/suggest :) Check us out at Twitter.com/WatchMojo and Facebook.com/WatchMojo We have T-Shirts! Be sure to check out http://www.WatchMojo.com/store for more info. Help us caption & translate this video! http://amara.org/v/E7cf/
Views: 705793 WatchMojo.com
Learn how to make Inferences
 
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Learn how to make inferences in literature, nonfiction and real life, and to support those inferences with strong, reliable evidence. An inference is just coming to a logical conclusion from whatever evidence you have. It’s one of the most valuable thinking skills you can learn. The ability to make inferences is one of the things that make a person what we call “smart.” And we say the person who can’t make inferences is “a little slow on the uptake,” right?, because other people figure out what’s going on more quickly than he or she does. We have to spell things out explicitly for that person. So, when your teacher says he or she is going to help you learn how to make good inferences, imagine in your head that he or just said that you’re going to learn how to be smart today. You’re going to learn how to think, because, ultimately, that’s what making inferences is all about. Now on Twitter @mistersato411!
Views: 249741 mistersato411
Of Pentameter & Bear Baiting - Romeo & Juliet Part I: Crash Course English Literature #2
 
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In which John Green examines Romeo & Juliet by William Shakespeare. John delves into the world of Bill Shakespeare's famous star-crossed lovers and examines what the play is about, its structure, and the context in which it was written. Have you ever wanted to know what iambic pentameter is? Then you should watch this video. Have you ever pondered what kind of people actually went to see a Shakespeare play in 1598? Watch this video. Were you aware that wherefore means "why?" Whether you were or not, watch this video. In Shakespeare's time, entertainment choices ranged from taking in a play to watching a restrained bear try to fight off a pack of dogs. Today on YouTube, our entertainment choices are just as wide-ranging. So you can either choose to watch the modern equivalent of bear baiting (another cinnamon challenge) or you can be edified and entertained by John and Crash Course. So wherefore are you reading this description instead of watching the video? Follow us! @thecrashcourse @realjohngreen @crashcoursestan @saysdanica @thoughtbubbler Like us! http://www.facebook.com/youtubecrashcourse Support CrashCourse on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/crashcourse
Views: 1470590 CrashCourse
100 Years of Solitude Part 1: Crash Course Literature 306
 
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Our first of two episodes about Gabriel Garcia Marquez's novel, 100 Years of Solitude. This week, we're looking at the Buendia family, and their many generations of people with the same names. We'll also look at the fascinating way the author thinks about time, and how time is represented in the book. Later, we'll get into the genre that Garcia Marquez worked in, which is called magical realism. Years later, we will have talked about all of this before. *** Crash Course is on Patreon! You can support us directly by signing up at http://www.patreon.com/crashcourse Thanks to the following Patrons for their generous monthly contributions that help keep Crash Course free for everyone forever: Mark, Bader Alghamdi, Eiryn Hegland, Kara Fitzgerald, Amanda Houle, Anna Windle, Kyle Anderson, Shekh Kori Rahman, Melissa Briski, Andre Krishkevich, Rachel Bright, Rizwan Kassim, Mayumi Maeda, Kathy & Tim Phillip, Jessica Wode, Brian Thomas Gossett, Caleb Weeks, Jirat, Tim Curwick, Eric Kitchen, Daniel Baulig, Moritz Schmidt, Ian Dundore, Chris Peters, SR Foxley, Jason A Saslow, Robert Kunz, Steve Marshall, Jeffrey Thompson, Sheikh Kori Rahman Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 407639 CrashCourse
What is Dante's Inferno? | Overview & Summary!
 
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In part one of our overview of Dante's Divine Comedy, we look at Inferno and outline the nine circles of Hell. Dante's Purgatorio and Paradiso will follow! IAYTD is your one-stop shop for all things comics, movies, television, and more. If you're curious about fandoms like Game of Thrones or the Marvel Cinematic Universe, I can help with my regular What Is videos that summarize a hobby or interest in just a few minutes! If you love movies but maybe you're not current, I'll prepare you for the newest entries in the biggest franchises like Fast and the Furious and Star Wars. FACEBOOK: http://facebook.com/IAYTD INSTAGRAM: @iaytd TWITTER: https://twitter.com/iaytd WEBSITE: http://iamyourtargetdemographic.com Here are some of my favorites! Guide to Omega Level Mutants: https://youtu.be/eCB8eenktmo Understanding Marvel's Movie Rights: https://youtu.be/1ZT_ni9HgnI What is Dungeons and Dragons: https://youtu.be/xh6hqDR-RKc How to Record and Send a Video Response: https://youtu.be/uQxRKepEqFA
Standard Deviation - Explained and Visualized
 
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Video transcript: "Have we discovered a new particle in physics? Is a manufacturing process out of control? What percentage of men are taller than Lebron James? How about taller than Yao Ming? All of these questions can be answered using the concept of standard deviation. For any set of data, the mean and standard deviation can be calculated. For example, five people may have the following amounts of money in their wallets: 21, 50, 62, 85, and 90. The mean is $61.60 and the standard deviation is $28.01. How much does the data vary from the average? Standard deviation is a measure of spread, that is, how spread out a set of data is. A low standard deviation tells us that the data is closely clustered around the mean (or average), while a high standard deviation indicates that the data is dispersed over a wider range of values. It is used when the distribution of data is approximately normal, resembling a bell curve. Standard deviation is commonly used to understand whether a specific data point is “standard” and expected or unusual and unexpected. Standard deviation is represented by the lowercase greek letter sigma. A data point’s distance from the mean can be measured by the number of standard deviations that it is above or below the mean. A data point that is beyond a certain number of standard deviations from the mean represents an outcome that is significantly above or below the average. This can be used to determine whether a result is statistically significant or part of expected variation, such as whether a bottle with an extra ounce of soda is to be expected or warrants further investigation into the production line. The 68-95-99.7 rule tells us that about 68% of the data fall within one standard deviation of the mean. About 95% of data fall within two standard deviations of the mean. And about 99.7% of data fall within 3 standard deviations of the mean. The average height of an American adult male is 5’10, with a standard deviation of 3 inches. Using the 68-95-99.7 rule, this means that 68% of American men are 5’10 plus or minus 3 inches, 95% of American men are 5’10 plus or minus 6 inches, and 99.7% of American men are 5’10 plus or minus 9 inches. So, this means only about .3% of American men deviate more than 9 inches from the average, with .15% taller than 6’7 and .15% shorter than 5’1. This reasoning suggests that Lebron James is 1 in 2500 and Yao Ming is 1 in 450 million. In particle physics, scientists have what are called 5-sigma results, results that are five standard deviations above or below the mean. A result that varies this much can signify a discovery as it has only a 1 in 3.5 million chance that it is due to random fluctuation. In summary, standard deviation is a measure of spread. Along with the mean, the standard deviation allows us to determine whether a value is statistically significant or part of expected variation."
Views: 832307 Jeremy Jones
Aliens, Time Travel, and Dresden -Slaughterhouse-Five Part I: Crash Course Literature 212
 
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You can directly support Crash Course at https://www.patreon.com/crashcourse Subscribe for as little as $0 to keep up with everything we're doing. Free is nice, but if you can afford to pay a little every month, it really helps us to continue producing this content. In which John Green teaches you about Kurt Vonnegut's most famous novel, Slaughterhouse-Five. Vonnegut wrote the book in the Vietnam era, and it closely mirrors his personal experiences in World War II, as long as you throw out the time travel and aliens and porn stars and stuff. Slaughterhouse-Five tells the story of Billy Pilgrim, a World War II veteran who was a prisoner of war, and survived the Battle of the Bulge and the fire-bombing of Dresden, goes home after the war, and has trouble adapting to civilian life (this is the part that's like Vonnegut's own experience). Billy Pilgrim has flashbacks to the war that he interprets as being "unstuck in time." He believes he's been abducted by aliens, and pretty much loses it. You'll learn a little about Vonnegut's life, quite a bit about Dresden, and probably more than you'd like about barbershop quartets as a metaphor for post traumatic stress.
Views: 878167 CrashCourse
Who decides what art means? - Hayley Levitt
 
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Find out how students can share their ideas as TED Talks here: http://bit.ly/2zpAQUc View full lesson: https://ed.ted.com/lessons/who-decides-what-art-means-hayley-levitt There is a question that has been tossed around by philosophers and art critics for decades: how much should an artist's intention affect your interpretation of the work? Do the artist’s plans and motivations affect its meaning? Or is it completely up to the judgment of the viewer? Hayley Levitt explores the complex web of artistic interpretation. Lesson by Hayley Levitt, directed by Avi Ofer. Thank you so much to our patrons for your support! Without you this video would not be possible! Merit Gamertsfelder, Bev Millar, Rishi Pasham, Jhuval, SookKwan Loong, Daniel Day, Nick Johnson, Bruno Pinho, Javier Aldavaz, Marc Veale, Boytsov Ilya, maxi kobi einy, Misaki Sato, Andrew Bosco, Nik Maier, Mark Morris, Tamás Drávai, Adi V, Peter Liu, Leora Allen, Hiroshi Uchiyama, Julie Cummings-Debrot, Gilly, Ka-Hei Law, Maya Toll, Aleksandar Srbinovski, Ricardo Rendon Cepeda, Renhe Ji, Andrés Melo Gámez, and Tim Leistikow.
Views: 192098 TED-Ed
Analysis of The Road Not Taken by Robert Frost
 
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http://xoax.net/ Additional Analysis at: http://xoax.net/english/crs/literature/lessons/RFrost_Mending_Wall_Analysis/ This video is an analysis of Robert Frost's poem "The Road Not Taken." Please submit all questions to our forum: http://xoax.net/forum/ Copyright 2009 XoaX.net LLC
Views: 243481 xoaxdotnet
Trailer Literature in The Digital Age (2018)
 
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As we make sense of what we read, we construe meaning using the ancient cultural technique of interpretation. Only rarely do we actually reflect this process: what are the means that help us to understand literary texts? How does interpretation work? And how has our increasing use of e-books and tablets changed the way we read and interpret literature? This free online course addresses these key questions as it introduces you to a variety of ways of interpreting literary texts. We will look into time-tested methods such as close reading and historical contextualisation. We shall address also the more recent, computer-assisted practices such as distant reading.
The Dystopian World of 1984 Explained
 
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George Orwell's novel has been brought up recently. Many terms and facts are used. The world he crafted doses have some similarities, but it in itself is dystopian in its own right. What caused this to happen? What made 1984 such a dark novel that Orwellian is now a term? This is one video to explain. Follow on Twitter: https://twitter.com/AltHistoryHub Music by Myuu: https://www.google.com/webhp?sourceid=chrome-instant&ion=1&espv=2&ie=UTF-8#q=myuu&*
Views: 2052493 AlternateHistoryHub
"Reading in the Digital Age" – Trailer
 
01:27
As we make sense of what we read, we construe meaning using the ancient cultural technique of interpretation. Only rarely do we actually reflect this process: what are the means that help us to understand literary texts? How does interpretation work? And how has our increasing use of e-books and tablets changed the way we read and interpret literature? This free online course addresses these key questions as it introduces you to a variety of ways of interpreting literary texts. We will look into time-tested methods such as close reading and historical contextualisation. We shall address also the more recent, computer-assisted practices such as distant reading.
Views: 371 Universität Basel
PLATO ON: The Allegory of the Cave
 
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Plato made up an enduring story about why philosophy matters based on an allegory about a cave… Please subscribe here: http://tinyurl.com/o28mut7 If you like our films take a look at our shop (we ship worldwide): http://theschooloflife.com/shop/all/ Subscribe to Wisecrack http://youtube.com/wisecrack Brought to you by http://theschooloflife.com Produced in collaboration with Mad Adam Films http://madadamfilms.co.uk #TheSchoolOfLife
Views: 961403 The School of Life
What Went Wrong:  The Ongoing Fragmentation of Apocalyptic Interpretation
 
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Interpretations for the Book of Revelation continue to multiply. Obviously, they cannot all be right. How did this happen? What went wrong? Top reasons for the failure of Apocalyptic Interpretation. www.fromreformationtoreformation.com
Video SparkNotes: Joseph Conrad's Heart of Darkness summary
 
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Check out Joseph Conrad's Heart of Darkness Video SparkNote: Quick and easy Heart of Darkness synopsis, analysis, and discussion of major characters and themes in the novel. For more Heart of Darkness resources, go to www.sparknotes.com/lit/heart. For a translation of the entire book into modern English, go to No Fear Literature at www.sparknotes.com/nofear/lit/.
Views: 760419 VideoSparkNotes
Carl Jung - What are the Archetypes?
 
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In this video we investigate what Carl Jung called archetypes, explaining what they are, how they influence our lives, their relationship to symbols, and their connection to religious experiences. ============================================ Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/academyofideas PayPal: https://www.paypal.me/academyofideas Amazon Affiliate Link: http://amzn.to/2kI9BuL Carl Jung and The Shadow: https://gum.co/jung-shadow Sign up for our mailing list: http://academyofideas.com/newsletter/ Get the transcript: http://academyofideas.com/2017/02/carl-jung-what-are-archetypes ============================================ Recommended Reading: The Archetypes and The Collective Unconscious - Carl Jung - http://amzn.to/2kHxK4B (affiliate link) The Myth of Meaning in the Work of C. G. Jung - Aniela Jaffe - http://amzn.to/2kuFoyc (affiliate link) The Origins and History of Consciousness - Erich Neumann - http://amzn.to/2kuG32E (affiliate link) Ego and Archetype - Edward Edinger - http://amzn.to/2kQl8KJ (affiliate link) The Creation of Consciousness: Jung's Myth for Modern Man - Edward Edinger - http://amzn.to/2kHGsiW (affiliate link)
Views: 688411 Academy of Ideas

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