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One Breath Around The World
 
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*** ONE BREATH AROUND THE WORLD *** NEW FILM: Our new short film (12 min) is finally out. Turn out the light, put your headphones and freedive with me around the world This great adventure was possible thanks to the support of a great team * Julie Gautier, my wife. One more time she did an AMAZING work. Everything she is shooting with her camera become magic. Of course, she shot as usual all the images on breath hold! * Almo Film and his boss Morgan Le Faucheur for his support as co producer of the project during the post production process. * Ben Nardini, the multi task guy: Editing, Sound design and drone pilot! * Guillaume Ferran, the magician behind the original soundtrack * Arthur Paux, as usual, who made the beautiful color correction * Leonard Mercier added a great touch with the compositing and stabilization * Xavier Fulbert / Ideocast made the sound mix * Franck Seguin the fantastic photographer who made a book edited by Glenat #apleinsouffle Of course, nothing would be possible without the safety and logistic support from our friends / freedivers around the world: Wilfried Souza, Nico, Dolswim, Julien Borde, Pranamaya Freediving, Rodrigo Salsas, Louis Pasquer, Suzanne Lim, Luke Schroeder, Catalin Craciun, Freediving Coron, Carlo Navarro, MJ Paula, Odessa Bugarin, Ryuzo Shinomiya, Tomoka Tsukakoshi, Kikachiro and Shotaro Maja, Denis Grosmaire, Moorea freediving, Sane Richmond, Tetamanu Village et Diving, Patea Alexandre, Tevai Malinowski, Monique Daudon, Antero Joki, Maria Hellinger, Kiki Bosch Supported by Cressi, Nauticam, Department of Tourism - Philippines, Bluenery Special thanks: Clovis Kerville, Mauritius Film Development Corporation, René Heuzey, Divers' Ocean, Juli and Salomon, Imam El Dio, Daniel Minnella, Ville de Nice, Véronique El Bahjaoui, Hélène De Tayrac-Senik, Bastien Soleil Special thanks to The Oceania Project for the whale song at the end: soundcloud.com/iwhales
Views: 6502422 Guillaume Néry
Seas Oceans Bays Gulfs Lakes Straits on the Earth: Learn with Amar
 
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amazing kid explains you about water bodies in the world part-1. watch kara sea, laptev sea, bohai sea on my "rivers of the world" video
Views: 611753 Learn with Amar
BIGGEST Sea Creatures Around The World!
 
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Check out the biggest sea creatures around the world! This top 10 list of largest ocean animals on earth features some crazy monsters lurking in the deep sea! Subscribe For New Videos! http://goo.gl/UIzLeB Watch our "Most TERRIFYING Sea Monsters Ever!" video here: https://youtu.be/B9aPB6KB504 Watch our "CREEPY Fish From The Deep Sea!" video here: https://youtu.be/IjbRmTvO1_g Watch our "Most MYSTERIOUS Ocean Facts!" video here: https://youtu.be/BzrlpgRVPQg 10.) Fin Whale The fin whale is the second largest creature on Earth after the blue whale. It has been severely affected by commercial whaling and now it is rare to see one. If you have seen one, consider yourself lucky! They can grow as long as 89 feet (27 m) in length and can weigh between 40 to 80 tons! The maximum ever recorded weighed in at 114 tons!! They can live to be over 100 years old if left alone. The fin whale’s body is built for speed and it can even go faster than the fastest ocean steamship. It’s capable of speeds of up to 37 km/h but can go short bursts of even 47 km/h, earning it the nickname “greyhound of the sea”. Fin Whales have a very unique coloring with the right underside of their jaw, right lip, and the right side of their baleen being a yellowish-white, while the left-side is gray, making them look asymmetrical. Fun fact, fin whales and blue whales make the lowest frequency sounds of any animals. When they were first recorded by submarines, scientists thought they were tectonic plates grinding. Kind of makes you wonder about what is causing other mysterious ocean sounds! 9.) Portuguese Man of War While this is often considered a jellyfish, the Portuguese man-of-war is actually not an “it” but a “they”! It is made up of a colony of organisms called polyps that work together known as a siphonophore. While the tentacles can extend 165 feet (50 m), the average is about 30 feet (9 m) long. Still nothing to scoff at!! Also known as “the floating terror”, their body is between 5 inches to a foot wide (13 cm- 130 cm). They are usually found in groups of about a thousand or more, and have no independent means of movement. They either drift on the currents or catch the wind, so even though you should be super careful of jellyfish, they aren’t ever out to get you on purpose! The tentacles on a man-of-war are extremely venomous and very painful if you get stung but they are rarely deadly. The venom is typically used to paralyze their prey, such as small fish and other smaller creatures. Also keep in mind that a man-of-war does not need to be alive in order to give off a powerful sting, even if it has washed up on shore and looks dead, it can still sting you! The Portuguese man-of-war floats around the Atlantic Ocean, as well as the Indian and Pacific. So keep an eye out if you are swimming around these areas! 8.) Giant Clam The giant clam is the largest living bivalve mollusk on earth. (Bivalve mollusks include clams, oysters, and mussels). Native to the warm waters of Australia's Great Barrier Reef, giant clams are capable of growing an average of 4 feet (1 m) in length and weighing close to 500 pounds (250 kg)! However, some species of clams have been known to grow as long as 6 feet. The large majority of a giant clam’s mass is in its shell, with the soft parts accounting for only approximately 10% of the weight. Giant clams are now endangered because they apparently are also quite delicious and have been hunted for centuries for its healthy protein. The giant clam has one chance to find its perfect home because once it chooses its spot, it stays there for the rest of its life. They can live up to 100 years or more, as long as they are in the wild. Most of the giant clams you see today have been raised in captivity and are really popular in large aquariums. Giant clams achieve their enormous proportions by consuming the sugars and proteins produced by the billions of algae that live in their tissues. This symbiotic relationship protects the algae and they are responsible for the unique coloration. No two giant clams are alike! 7.) Great White Shark According to National Geographic, great white sharks are the largest predatory fish in the world. They grow to an average of 15 feet (4.6 m) in length. However, there have been some who have grown to 20 feet (6 m) in length! In fact, the largest Great White Shark ever recorded in the wild was estimated to be 26 feet long, which is more than half the length of a basketball court. Combine this with a bunch of teeth, and this is why people get so scared. They are known to weigh up to 5,000 pounds (2268 kg). The heaviest Great White Shark ever recorded in the wild was estimated to weigh in at a whopping 7,328 pounds. . Origins Explained is the place to be to find all the answers to your questions, from mysterious events and unsolved mysteries to everything there is to know about the world and its amazing animals!
Views: 5451176 Origins Explained
10 MOST DANGEROUS OCEAN CREATURES IN THE WORLD
 
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10 Most Dangerous Water Animals In The World ► Subscribe: https://goo.gl/vHN6qB For copyright matters please contact us at: [email protected] There are many different types of creatures that live in streams, lakes, seas and oceans. And while many of these creatures are harmless, there are many that are incredibly dangerous if you happen to have an encounter with them. These dangerous animals lurk beneath the surface of the water in a world vastly different than ours, and must be deadly to survive. Join us as we take a look at 10 of the most dangerous water creatures. 10. Australian Box Jellyfish – This creature is not one to be messed around with if you happen to swim into a swarm of them. And while they may seem harmless, the Australian box jellyfish is considered to be the most venomous marine animal in the world. They have tentacles that are covered with tiny darts called nematocysts, and they are loaded with poison. 9. Flower Urchin – Beautiful but deadly, these sea urchins are extremely venomous. They look like a bouquet of small flowers; to which they get their name from. They feed on invertebrates, sponges, and dead fish, and have well developed jaws for grinding up their prey. 8. The Saltwater Crocodile – Evolving around 200 million years in the Mesozoic epoch, crocodiles have far outlived the dinosaurs. The Salt water crocodile is the world’s largest reptile, and they have been known to grow up to 27 feet long and weigh 2,465 lbs. 7. Textile Cone Snail – Mother nature teaches us that anything in nature that is beautiful, is most likely deadly, and a warning to predators and humans to not touch or disturb them. This holds true for the Textile Cone Snail. 6. The Sea Snake – These highly venomous marine snakes are closely related and belong to the same family as the cobra. There are two independently evolved groups: the true sea snakes which are related to Australian terrestrial elapids, and the sea kraits which are related to Asian cobras. 5. The Lionfish – Lionfish are skilled hunters, using specialized bilateral swim bladder muscles to provide exquisite control of location in the water column, allowing the fish to alter its center of gravity to better attack prey. The lionfish then spreads its large pectoral fins and swallows its prey in a single motion. 4. The Stingray – Stingrays are a group of rays, which are cartilaginous fish related to sharks, and are one of the oceans deadliest creatures. Most stingrays have one or more barbed stingers on their tails, which are used exclusively for self-defense. 3. Blue-Ringed Octopus – This octopus has some of the most striking colors of any ocean creature. They get their name from the brightly blue colored rings on its body. 2. Needlefish – These strange looking creatures are very slender, and have a single dorsal fin, placed far back on the body. Needlefish are capable of making short jumps out of the water at up to 37 mph. Since Needlefish swim near the surface, they often leap over the decks of shallow boats rather than going around. 1. The Moray Eel - Most attacks stem from disruption of a moray's burrow to which they react strongly, but an increasing number of accidents also occur during hand feeding of morays by divers, an activity often used by dive companies to attract tourists.
Views: 15704429 Interesting Facts
FRIENDLIEST Sea Creatures Around The World!
 
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Check out the friendliest sea creatures around the world! From incredible animals that saved peoples lives to the strangest ocean wildlife, this top 10 list of friendly creatures swimming around in the vast ocean is amazing! Subscribe For New Videos! http://goo.gl/UIzLeB Watch our "Most MYSTERIOUS Ocean Facts!" video here: https://youtu.be/BzrlpgRVPQg Watch our "Most TERRIFYING Sea Monsters Ever!" video here: https://youtu.be/B9aPB6KB504 Watch our "STRANGEST Things Found In The Ocean!" video here: https://youtu.be/XYfqi5VNgac 10. Sea Lions Sea Lions have long been associated with friendly interactions with humans, so much so that they form a large part of Peruvian culture- having been worshipped by the people there and depicted in numerous artworks. They are highly intelligent animals, which means they can learn tricks to entertain crowds, and are quite curious so they will often swim up alongside humans and play with them in the water. They are also used by the US military to assist SCUBA diving teams look for underwater mines and, in some instances, detain divers who have accessed restricted areas until authorities can arrive. Sea lions and dolphins are used as combat marine units and sea lions especially, have excellent eyesight. Sea lions are hardy, smart, and trainable and they have the added advantage that they are amphibious and can easily hand things to their handlers. This all makes Sea Lions sound like gentle creatures, but it’s important to know that sea lions have another side to them. If they aren’t treated well or respectfully, they can become quite aggressive. This can also happen with male Sea Lions because they are very territorial during mating season. If it looks like you’re bothering one then stay away but, if not, they are one of the friendliest sea creatures you’ll ever meet. 9. Beluga Whale Beluga Whales are native to the Arctic and sub-arctic, and are uniquely adapted to the cold waters. They are white in color, don’t have a dorsal fin, and have an enlarged head, which contains an organ called a melon that is used for echolocation. Beluga’s were actually the first type of whale to be kept in captivity, with the first being shown at Barnum’s museum in New York in 1861. To this day they are still the most commonly seen animal in marine parks across North America, Europe and Asia- mainly because they are much smaller than other species of whale and easier to contain. They are also a hit with visitors because of their unusual colour and wide range of facial expressions. They are really curious about the people who visit them, and often perform in shows with trainers who they develop deep bonds with. Since 1992 it has been forbidden to capture Belugas in Canada because of concerns for the population numbers in the wild, so now most of them come from Russia. They are so popular that each one can cost as much as 100,000 dollars. Whale watching tours are a great way to see them in their natural habitat, but it’s important for the boat not to get too close to them because of the way it can interrupt their daily activities. Quite often they enjoy interacting with the boats so much that they get distracted from things like feeding, social interaction with their own species, and breeding. They get so caught up in the moment, they forget what they’re supposed to be doing!! 8. Whale Shark You might not think a shark with a five-foot-wide mouth and more than 3,000 teeth would be the friendliest of creatures, but whale sharks are the most gentle of all shark species. They pose no threat to humans at all, and are usually pretty welcoming to those who want to swim alongside them. Despite their huge mouth, their throats are only the width of a US quarter, and they only eat tiny micro-organisms. Their average speed through the water is about 3 miles per hour, so they are easy to keep up with, and in a lot of tourist areas they are used to the presence of humans in the water, and don’t really seem to be bothered. Cancun is one of the best places to swim with these giants of the ocean, where you’ll really feel small next to a 65-foot-long and 12 ton fish. There really is nothing quite like being surrounded by a few of them, and the experience draws tourists from all over the world. If you visit “Las Afueras” you’ll even have a chance to be amongst a feeding frenzy of hundreds of them, which is a spectacular feat of nature. 7. Manatees Manatees, or sea cows, are also known as gentle giants, and it’s clear to see why. They are fully aquatic and feed mainly on plant life that they sift from the water. They can grow to up to 13-feet-long, weigh about 1,300 pounds, and push their way through the water with their paddle like limbs. Origins Explained is the place to be to find all the answers to your questions, from mysterious events and unsolved mysteries to everything there is to know about the world and its amazing animals!
Views: 3628487 Origins Explained
5 Biggest Tsunami Caught On Camera
 
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5 Mega Tsunami Caught On Camera — Enjoy the video. Rate, Comment, Share... Thanx For copyright matters please contact us at: [email protected] Tsunamis are giant waves caused by earthquakes or volcanic eruptions under the sea. Out in the depths of the ocean, tsunami waves do not dramatically increase in height. But as the waves travel inland, they build up to higher and higher heights as the depth of the ocean decreases. The speed of tsunami waves depends on ocean depth rather than the distance from the source of the wave. Tsunami waves may travel as fast as jet planes over deep waters, only slowing down when reaching shallow waters. While tsunamis are often referred to as tidal waves, this name is discouraged by oceanographers because tides have little to do with these giant waves. The 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami was triggered by a 9.3 magnitude earthquake with the initial surge wave of the tsunami measuring 33 metres. It was the largest earthquake-generated tsunami in history. Certain places in the world are subject to earthquakes and tsunamis more than others as there are only seven tectonic plates covering the earth and the borders of these plates lie in certain areas. WATCH MORE: 5 Biggest Tsunami Caught On Camera https://youtu.be/6Xpwsib0LZ4 Unbelievable Natural Disasters Caught on Tape! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9baxXMc5vSY 11 Scariest Things Caught By Drones https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Jnei1md-Ia0 If it were not filmed, no one would believe it https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4FnN4vseiXQ MEGA TSUNAMI https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r_E7yrCAq58
Views: 74388832 Monthly Winners
Experience the Underwater World Through the Eyes of a Free Diver | Short Film Showcase
 
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Free diver Guillaume Néry takes you on an underwater journey that will take your breath away. ➡ Subscribe: http://bit.ly/NatGeoSubscribe ➡ Get More Short Film Showcase: http://bit.ly/ShortFilmShowcase #NationalGeographic #FreeDiving #DeepSea About Short Film Showcase: The Short Film Showcase spotlights exceptional short videos created by filmmakers from around the web and selected by National Geographic editors. We look for work that affirms National Geographic's belief in the power of science, exploration, and storytelling to change the world. The filmmakers created the content presented, and the opinions expressed are their own, not those of National Geographic Partners. Know of a great short film that should be part of our Showcase? Email [email protected] to submit a video for consideration. See more from National Geographic's Short Film Showcase at http://documentary.com Get More National Geographic: Official Site: http://bit.ly/NatGeoOfficialSite Facebook: http://bit.ly/FBNatGeo Twitter: http://bit.ly/NatGeoTwitter Instagram: http://bit.ly/NatGeoInsta Free diver Guillaume Néry glides beneath ice sheets, walks the ocean floor with spearfishermen, and swims with whales in this breathtaking short by Les Films Engloutis. Shot in France, Finland, Mexico, Japan, and the Philippines, One Breath Around the World takes viewers on an unparalleled underwater journey. Julie Gautier, Néry’s wife, filmed the piece while free diving as well. Follow Guillaume Néry: https://www.youtube.com/user/guillaumenery See more from Les Films Engloutis: http://www.lesfilmsengloutis.com/en/ About National Geographic: National Geographic is the world's premium destination for science, exploration, and adventure. Through their world-class scientists, photographers, journalists, and filmmakers, Nat Geo gets you closer to the stories that matter and past the edge of what's possible. Experience the Underwater World Through the Eyes of a Free Diver | Short Film Showcase https://youtu.be/L4qM1IEhtNQ National Geographic https://www.youtube.com/natgeo
Views: 2818506 National Geographic
30 Days Timelapse at Sea | 4K | Through Thunderstorms, Torrential Rain & Busy Traffic
 
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Follow my adventures on Instagram! http://instagram.com/Jeffrey.hk 30 Days of Timelapse, about 80,000 photos combined. 1500GB of Project files. Sailing in the open ocean is a unique feeling and experience.I hope to capture and share it for everyone to see. Route was from Red Sea -- Gulf of Aden -- Indian Ocean -- Colombo -- Malacca Strait -- Singapore -- South East China Sea -- Hong Kong Music: Philip G Anderson - Winter (from 0:00 to 4:37 and 8:00 to 10:00) Buy Winter here: https://philipganderson.bandcamp.com/album/winter Stellardrone - Billions And Billions (from 4:37 to 8:00) Camera used: D750, Rokinon 12mm f/2.8 0:32 Milky Way 0:53 Sirius Star (I think) Correction: Jupiter the planet according to some viewers 1:17 Approaching Port of Colombo 1:45 Cargo Operation 2:08 Departure Colombo with Rainstorm 2:29 Beautiful Sunrise 3:13 Lightning Storm at Malacca Strait and Singapore Strait 3:29 Clear night sky Milky Way with lightning storm 4:01 Camera getting soaked 5:09 Arrival Singapore 5:56 Departure Singapore 6:20 Moon-lit night sky 6:48 Another Sunrise 8:30 Headed due north and you can see Ursa Major rotating neatly around Polaris. 8:36 Squid Boats 8:54 Chaotic Traffic 9:15 Arrival Hong Kong =====10 Reasons Why Maritime is AWESOME ===== https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0U18AHZbS_M =====10 Reasons Why Maritime SUCKS ===== https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tdMYEKwxTyo =====How To Anchor a Mega-Ship ===== https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=62O7KYfb4GA =====Where did I go last 2 months?? Cancun Adventure====== https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nsizwRUXoa0 =====Navigation Bridge of a Mega Ship===== https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Bj3_peT4u9M =====A Tour of Mega Ship's Engine Room===== https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s7BhBsVigZw =====HEAVY SEAS! Bad Weather in Atlantic Ocean===== https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OZA6gNeZ5G4 =====Cargo Operations on Ship===== https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kj7ixi2lqF4 =====Top 6 Questions about Merchant Marine===== https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wBpQ9Y4jEfg For licensing and usage, contact: [email protected]
Views: 14266748 JeffHK
Eurythmics - Sweet Dreams (Are Made Of This) (Official Video)
 
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Eurythmics - Sweet Dreams (Are Made Of This) (Official Video) Preorder Eurythmics vinyl released in 2018 -http://smarturl.it/EU_multi Listen on Spotify -http://smarturl.it/EUC_SP Listen on Apple Music - http://smarturl.it/Eurythmics_Essential Amazon - http://smarturl.it/EUC_AM Follow Eurythmics Website - http://www.eurythmics.com/ Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/eurythmics/ Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/eurythmicsmusic/ Twitter - https://twitter.com/eurythmics Lyrics Sweet dreams are made of this Who am I to disagree? I travel the world and the seven seas Everybody's looking for something Some of them want to use you Some of them want to get used by you Some of them want to abuse you Some of them want to be abused Sweet dreams are made of this Who am I to disagree? I travel the world and the seven seas Everybody's looking for something Hold your head up, keep your head up, movin' on Hold your head up, movin' on, keep your head up, movin' on Hold your head up, movin' on, keep your head up, movin' on Hold your head up, movin' on, keep your head up Some of them want to use you Some of them want to get used by you Some of them want to abuse you Some of them want to be abused Sweet dreams are made of this Who am I to disagree? I travel the world and the seven seas Everybody's looking for something Sweet dreams are made of this Who am I to disagree? I travel the world and the seven seas Everybody's looking for something Sweet dreams are made of this Who am I to disagree? I travel the world and the seven seas Everybody's looking for something Sweet dreams are made of this Who am I to disagree? I travel the world and the seven seas Everybody's looking for something"
Views: 367524069 EurythmicsVEVO
Sailing Around the World (Sailing La Vagabonde) - Ep. 1 Intro & Sailing Turkey
 
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Having zero knowledge or experience with sailing, or even how to furl in the head sail, we bought a yacht in Italy.. we plan to circumnavigate the globe eventually, or just get the boat back to Australia. Documenting the voyage as we go. Turns out sailing isn't always as relaxing or easy as it looks and we are forever learning new things (seems to be not always the easy way).. Enjoy the video & subscribe to follow the voyage! Ps. If you are following our adventure, like what we are doing, and would like to help us get La Vaga around the world please support us on Patreon! Every cent counts and is HUGELY appreciated. It is YOU who make these videos possible. Subscribe to our Website for updates! (no spamming, we promise) http://www.sailing-lavagabonde.com Please support us on Patreon! http://www.patreon.com/LaVagabonde Checkout some photos on Instagram! http://instagram.com/elayna__c/ Like us on Facebook! http://www.facebook.com/SailingLaVagabonde Please like and share and all that too. You guys are legends! Love Elayna & Riley Sailing La Vagabonde.
Views: 2860115 Sailing La Vagabonde
REAL Mermaid Sightings Around The World!
 
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Check out these real mermaid sightings around the world! This top 10 list of amazing discoveries of real life mermaid bodies is absolutely intrigueing! Subscribe For New Videos! http://goo.gl/UIzLeB Watch our "Ancient Objects And HOW They Were Used!" video here: https://youtu.be/0de2nV8OHJk Watch our "Most MYSTERIOUS Ocean Facts!" video here: https://youtu.be/BzrlpgRVPQg Watch our "Most STRANGE Things Found On The Beach!" video here: https://youtu.be/cQjpze_4z5U 10. British Columbia, 1967 In 1967, British Columbia became a hub of mermaid excitement when, one day, Ferry riders spotted a mermaid lounging on the shore of Mayne Island. They claimed they saw a topless, blonde woman with the tail of a porpoise sitting on the beach shore. Some witnesses even became very upset, as they believed they saw the mermaid eating a raw salmon. One tourist from Iowa even managed to take a picture. After the sighting, the mermaid was seen one more time the following week. As the locals got swept up by the spotting of this mysterious mermaid, the town locals began to seek any information relating to her. The town newspaper, The Colonist, put up a $25,000 reward for the mermaid. Arrangements were even made for the mermaid to have room and board once she was found and successfully acclimated into the town setting. Although many believe that the whole thing was a charade, many still believe that what they saw was real. 9. Scotland, 1830 Mermaids are a part of Scotland’s countless mysteries and legends. It’s not surprising, then, that there would be many accounts of mermaid sightings. In 1830, the people of the island of Benbecula saw a mermaid. While cutting seaweed near the shore one day, a woman reportedly saw a miniature woman swimming in the water. Surprised by her discovery, she called many people over to view the water dweller. Some men rushed at her in the water, either to catch her or get a closer look, and the woman swam out of reach. Some boys threw stones at the frightened mermaid and one struck her in the back. A few days later, the corpse of the mermaid supposedly washed up on the shore. Like many of the other claims of mermaids, this one was small, with pale white skin and had the tail of a fish without scales. After the discovery, the sheriff of the town thought it only fitting that the mermaid have a proper burial. Someone constructed a coffin and the mermaid, wrapped in a shroud, was laid to rest above the shoreline where she was found. To this day, no one knows exactly where the mermaid was buried as no marker was left to denote the spot. 8. West Indies, 1614 John Smith, the same John Smith from Pocahontas, reported that he saw a mermaid off the coast of West Indies in 1614. According to the story, Smith saw a woman swimming parallel to the shore. He was captivated by the grace in which she moved and noted that she had ears that were too long, a nose that was too short, eyes that were too round, and green hair. He also noted that the woman was a little attractive from the waist up. From the waist down, however, she was all fish. Some doubt has been thrown on the veracity of the tale of course, otherwise where would the mystery be. One source claims he wasn’t in the West Indies but in Newfoundland. Another historian says Smith wasn’t in the West Indies in 1614, though he was there in 1607. Potato patato in this case. The same historian suggested that Alexandre Dumas fabricated the tale to give credence to his own mermaid story about a Frenchman searching for a Dutchman who had four children with a mermaid. 7. Norway, 1608 In 1608, Henry Hudson explored the cold northern waters off Norway. Written in his journal, he describes a day when he encountered a group of mermaids. Hudson claimed a mermaid appeared in the water, saw his crew and called up more of her mermaid sisters. He described the women as being as big as the men in his crew, with very white skin and long dark hair. He claimed their tails looked like a dolphin’s but were spotted like a mackerel. Hudson was thrilled that he had discovered mermaids. What makes this case so strange is that it occurred in the Bering Sea. Most mermaid sightings are discounted as sailors mistaking animals, often manatees, as mermaids. However, no manatees swim the waters of the Bering Sea. Naturalist Philip Henry Gosse, in his mid-1800s work The Romance of Natural History, believes it to be impossible that Hudson mistook an animal for this mermaid. He believes seasoned sailors such as Hudson would be able to identify animals in that location easily. Gosse believes either Hudson made this entire story up or Hudson saw something truly unique to the realm of science. We may never know. Origins Explained is the place to be to find all the answers to your questions, from mysterious events and unsolved mysteries to everything there is to know about the world and its amazing animals!
Views: 15560914 Origins Explained
19 DAYS AT SEA. SAILING ACROSS THE PACIFIC - Adventure 18 (Sailing Around the World)
 
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CURIOUS HOW WE DID IT? http://findingparadise.ca EXCLUSIVE BEHIND THE SCENES: https://www.patreon.com/nahoa/posts Facts... Boats encountered: 1 Freighter. 1 Fishing Boat. Fish Tally (Abysmal for 19 days at sea): 1 small Black Fin tuna. 4 Mahi Mahi. 2 Yellowfin Tuna. Max wind strength; 39 knots. Max wave height; 4 meters. Number of Squalls; Hundreds. Sail changes; hundreds. Max boat speed; 14.8 knots Stuff that broke: 1 mainsail bat car (holds the mainsail to the mast). 2 small tears in mainsail leach. 1 small tear in the mainsail luff. 1 tear in Code Zero. Headsail furler bearing seized. GoPro. (won't turn on) Olympus Point-and-shoot Underwater camera randomly filled with water. 1 glass jar of spaghetti sauce. (OVER THE ENTIRE KITCHEN FLOOR!) 6 lures lost. Distance covered: 2,980 Nautical Miles or 3,429 Miles or 5,518 Kilometres. video captured on; http://amzn.to/2ubfHvz with this lens; http://amzn.to/2sRIz82 microphone; http://amzn.to/2uaHVX8 Friends just brought down the new GoPro Hero 5 and it is Awesome! Incredible footage and it's waterproof: http://amzn.to/2uagVas Ashley's Worst: Seasickness (but she never chucked her cookies) and she swears by Sea Bands: http://amzn.to/2tgja7l Ashley's Best: Night shifts and the stars at night. It's incredible out here with zero light pollution! Ben's Worst: That Last Hour. Ben's Best: Catching and Eating a monster Yellowfin tuna. Subscribe On Our Blog: http://www.FindingParadise.ca Follow us: on https://www.instagram.com/ashstobbart/ or http://facebook.com/sailingnahoa
Views: 553778 Sailing Nahoa
Countries and Trade Routes near Mediterranean Sea
 
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Find out about the countries and various trade routes near Mediterranean Sea. The Mediterranean Sea is a sea connected to the Atlantic Ocean surrounded by the Mediterranean Basin and almost completely enclosed by land: on the north by Southern Europe and Anatolia, on the south by North Africa, and on the east by the Levant. The sea is sometimes considered a part of the Atlantic Ocean, although it is usually identified as a separate body of water.
Views: 76054 Amit Sengupta
Sea Glass Around The Globe
 
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This short documentary was made for the 2017 North American Sea Glass Festival. Director/Editor: Faith McCarthy. Executive Producer: Mary McCarthy, Education Chair/Board Member, North American Sea Glass Association.
Views: 7516 mary mccarthy
Most Dangerous Beaches In The World
 
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Click the link to subscribe: http://bit.ly/FactsVerse For copyright matters please contact us at: [email protected] Subscribe to our channel: http://bit.ly/FactsVerse Our Social Media: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/FactsVerse Twitter: https://twitter.com/FactsVerse Instagram: https://instagram.com/factsverse/ For more videos and articles visit: http://factsverse.com Music: Kevin MacLeod Image Credits : Narrated by : Darren Marlar www.MarlarHouse.com *If you click the above link, we may earn a small affiliate commission
Views: 12263729 Facts Verse
China Has Opened The World's Longest Sea Bridge
 
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An engineering marvel the Jiaozhou bay bridge has finally opened up after four years of construction. The 26.3 miles long bridge links the port city of Qingdao to the island of Huangdao.
Views: 7999639 icimblind
Most SPOOKY Sea Creatures In The World!
 
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Check out the Most SPOOKY Sea Creatures In The Ocean! From terrifying deep sea monsters to mysterious and bizarre animals, this top 10 list of weird ocean creatures will amaze you! Subscribe For New Videos! http://goo.gl/UIzLeB Watch our "REAL Mermaid Sightings Around The World!" video here: https://youtu.be/ChM0CBRmVsM Watch our "10 Sea Monsters ATTACKING A Boat!" video here: https://youtu.be/0XROvoPCDNc Watch our "STRANGEST Animals People Keep As Pets!" video here: https://youtu.be/OMa96nPqz-Y 7. Northern Stargazer Astroscopus guttatus is a strange-looking fish that’s known more commonly as the Northern Stargazer. In paradoxical contrast to its romantic-sounding name, the Northern Stargazer is, for lack of a better term, unattractive, if not downright homely. It dwells at the bottom of the Chesapeake Bay and along the eastern seaboard of the United States, from North Carolina to New York, in waters up to 120 feet deep. So if you live around here, keep an eye out! 6. Giant Squid Until 2006, the existence of the giant squid was considered to be barely more realistic than that of the Yeti, the Loch Ness Monster, Sasquatch, and dozens of other creatures that were rumored to exist, but remained largely relegated to mythological status. The only thing that placed the giant squid a notch or two above the rest of those creatures were the scars left on whales and the discovery of their carcasses by fishermen after having floated to the water’s surface. 5. Black Dragonfish The black dragonfish is a deep-sea dweller that resides about 2,000 meters below the ocean’s surface. The amazing thing about this guy is that is represents one of the most extreme cases of sexual dimorphism, which refers to a distinct difference between the sexes in size or appearance that exceeds the fundamental difference between sexual organs. 4. Deep Sea Anglerfish Like the black dragonfish, male deep sea anglerfish are smaller than females. In this case, some male species of anglerfish are parasitic, and subsist by attaching themselves to the body of a female. While they may not have a gut, they do have teeth! 3. Goblin Shark The goblin shark is a rare species of deep-sea shark. It’s the only surviving relative of a 125-million-year-old lineage known as the family Mitsukurinidae. Because of this, the goblin shark has earned the nickname “living fossil.” The goblin shark’s distinctive appearance is creepy to begin with: it’s pink-skinned with an elongated, flattened snout that resembles a sword blade. 2. Blobfish Our next spooky sea creature is, quite possibly, the world’s ugliest animal. I don’t know, between this and the deep sea angler fish, which one do you think?? Let me know in the comments below!! It goes through life doing exactly what you’d probably expect a blob to do - not much. In the deep waters off the coasts of Australia, Tasmania, and New Zealand that it calls home, the blobfish survives essentially by drifting around on the ocean floor at great depths and eating whatever appears in front of it, namely deepwater crustaceans. 1. Frilled Shark At first glance, the frilled shark looks like something you might see in a science fiction movie - perhaps, for example, an unlikely hybrid between an eel and a shark. The frilled shark however, is real. Like the goblin shark, it’s often referred to as a “living fossil,” a nickname that alludes to the minimal change the species has undergone since prehistoric times. Origins Explained is the place to be to find all the answers to your questions, from mysterious events and unsolved mysteries to everything there is to know about the world and its amazing animals!
Views: 293588 Origins Explained
Is the Dead Sea really dead?
 
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Because of its extremely high salt content, no animal or plant life can survive in the Dead Sea. So why do tourists from around the world flock to bathe in its deep blue waters? Clarissa Ward takes us on a trip to this exotic and unique destination.
Views: 2764256 CBS Sunday Morning
Sea Snakes | JONATHAN BIRD'S BLUE WORLD
 
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Many people don't realize that there are snakes that live in the ocean. And believe it or not, they're actually considerably more venomous than land snakes! Jonathan travels to Australia and the Philippines to find these marine reptiles, and learns why they are almost completely harmless to divers. This is an HD upload of a segment previously released in season 3. ********************************************************************** If you like Jonathan Bird's Blue World, don't forget to subscribe! You can join us on Facebook! https://www.facebook.com/BlueWorldTV Twitter https://twitter.com/BlueWorld_TV Instagram @blueworldtv Web: http://www.blueworldTV.com ********************************************************************** The sea snake is an animal surrounded in mystery—known for its incredibly powerful venom, but not much else. Just how dangerous are these marine reptiles? I have traveled to Queensland, Australia on a quest to learn about sea snakes. Here on Australia’s Great Barrier Reef, sea snakes are fairly common. Lets go see if we can find one. I hit the water, grab my camera and head towards the sea floor. Today I’m diving on a little seamount called a coral Bommie. It’s a mini-mountain of coral sticking up from the bottom, but not quite reaching the surface. Near the top of the Bommie, thousands of small fish feed on plankton passing by in the current, but they stay close to the reef, because they are being watched by a big school of jacks who are on the prowl for food themselves. The bommie is covered in healthy coral that provides lots of nooks and crannies for the fish to hide if they need cover. On the other side of the bommie, a large school of snappers are also looking for something to eat, and keeping a safe distance from the jacks. As I swim along at the base of the bommie, I’m keeping my eyes open for a snake-like animal. The coral looks healthy and a Spinecheek anemonefish gives me a quick glance from the safety of her host anemone. But I keep scanning the bottom and at last I have found my quarry: an olive sea snake, the most common species around the Great Barrier Reef. It’s swimming along the bottom doing the same thing everything else is doing—looking for food. The sea snake is closely related to a land snake, except it has adapted for life underwater. When a sea snake flicks its tongue, it’s getting rid of excess salt secreted by special glands in its mouth. Sea snakes live exclusively in the ocean, but since they’re reptiles, their kidneys can’t deal with too much excess salt in their blood. A sea snake gets around with a flattened section of tail that looks like an oar and serves as a fin. It looks just like an eel when it swims, undulating its body and getting propulsion from that flattened tail. Although sea snakes prefer to eat fish, eels and shrimp, these snappers aren’t at all afraid of the sea snake, because they are way too big for the sea snake to bite. This snake is heading for the surface to grab a breath of air. A sea snake, just like a land snake, has lungs and must breathe air to survive. It can hold its breath up to 3 hours during a dive. Recent research has shown that some sea snakes also can absorb a little bit of oxygen directly from the water through their skin, which is probably why a breath can last so long. After spending a minute at the surface breathing, the sea snake comes back down to the bottom. It’s poking around, looking for holes where it might corner a fish or shrimp. It sticks its head into the holes, hoping to get lucky. The sea snake is most closely related to the Cobra on land, and its venom is quite similar to cobra venom, but considerably more potent. If it manages to grab a fish, the venom will kill it in seconds. Sea snakes quite often take a rest on the bottom, sleeping as they hold their breath. I use the opportunity to sneak up on one. In spite of their fearsome venom, sea snakes are very timid and not particularly aggressive. Although this one is obviously not thrilled about being picked up, it doesn’t try to bite me. And when I let go, it just swims away. I find another one and can’t resist the opportunity to show the flattened tail section. Swim, be free! Although the sea snake is one of the most venomous animals in the world, you’re not very likely to be bitten by one. There are 62 known species of sea snakes and they live all around the tropical Indo-Pacific. I found this banded sea snake in the Philippines. They like nice warm tropical water because they are cold-blooded, like all reptiles. If the water gets too cold, they get lethargic. So, no matter what you might think of snakes, sea snakes are timid and shy animals that represent almost no threat at all to people, even though they produce some of the most powerful venom in the world.
Views: 7208938 BlueWorldTV
Sea Gypsies: The Far Side of the World
 
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Trailer for the film - www.seagypsiesmovie.com The vessel is Infinity, a 120 ft hand-built gypsy boat, crewed by a band of miscreants. The journey, an 8,000 mile pacific crossing, from New Zealand to Patagonia, with a stop in Antarctica. Unlike all the other boats heading to Antarctica though, Infinity is no well-financed, ice-reinforced super yacht, crewed by well-paid professional sailors, with carefully thought out agendas. Infinity lives in the moment and sails on a whim, without permission or insurance of any kind. What can to be found in abundance onboard, is blood, sweat, enthusiasm, disdain for authority and an ample supply of alcohol, a mad voyage of reckless adventure just for the thrill of it. Along the way the crew will battle a force 12 hurricane of ice in the Ross Sea, assist the radical environmental group Sea Shepherd in their fight with Japanese whalers, tear every sail they have and unwittingly go further south than any other sailing vessel in 2014. Underlying the dramatic sailing adventure, is the quest for awe and sense of wonder with the raw power of the natural world. The story touches on environmental activism themes, a rapidly diminishing ecosystem and raw adventure, not reserved for the elite. Winner of numerous awards and chosen for the Banff Mountain film World Tour, and Ocean Film Festival World Tour
Views: 49970 Sea Gypsies
Award-Winning Footage Of The Microsopic World Around Us
 
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This year’s Nikon Small World Motion Photomicrography Competition has given us a fascinating glimpse into the realm of the extremely tiny. Watch a flea giving birth and a zebrafish embryo developing its complex nervous system. And that’s just the start. Learn more about this year's submissions: https://globenewswire.com/news-release/2018/09/27/1577365/0/en/Developing-Sensory-Nervous-System-of-a-Zebrafish-Wins-2018-Nikon-Small-World-in-Motion-Competition.html Check out the gallery page: https://www.nikonsmallworld.com/galleries/2018-small-world-in-motion-competition ------------------------------------------------------ Science Insider tells you all you need to know about science: space, medicine, biotech, physiology, and more. Subscribe to our channel and visit us at: http://www.businessinsider.com/science Science Insider on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BusinessInsiderScience/ Science Insider on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/science_insider/ Business Insider on Twitter: https://twitter.com/businessinsider Tech Insider on Twitter: https://twitter.com/techinsider ------------------------------------------------------
Views: 1678131 Science Insider
Sea Snake Island | JONATHAN BIRD'S BLUE WORLD
 
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In this exciting adventure, Jonathan travels to Manuk, a tiny, uninhabited volcanic island several hundred miles from the nearest populated island in Indonesia, on a mission to discover why the waters of this remote place are teeming with thousands of venomous sea snakes! And if you love sea snakes, check out our adventure with sea snakes in Australia: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9gQY4m2HPYk ********************************************************************** If you like Jonathan Bird's Blue World, don't forget to subscribe! You can buy some Blue World T-shirts & Swag! http://www.blueworldtv.com/shop You can join us on Facebook! https://www.facebook.com/BlueWorldTV Twitter https://twitter.com/BlueWorld_TV Instagram @blueworldtv Web: http://www.blueworldTV.com ********************************************************************** Some of the world’s richest coral reefs thrive in Indonesia. Located in the middle of the so-called coral triangle, the diversity of species and colors of Indonesian reefs absolutely amazes me every time I get the chance to dive here. This time however, it’s not the reefs I have come to film, but a remote and uninhabited island whose waters are reputed to teem with thousands of sea snakes! The island, known as Manuk, is an active volcano a hundred kilometers from the nearest inhabited island, smack dab in the middle of the Indonesian archipelago. Getting there is no easy task. I have chartered the Seahorse, a traditional Indonesian Pinisi built for divers, for a special itinerary to reach Manuk Island. Divemaster Jandri meets me at the marina in Sorong. It took me 2 full days of flying just to get to Sorong from the United States! He takes me out to the Seahorse, my home away from home for the next two weeks. This expedition will take 14 divers 1200 miles across the Banda Sea, from Sorong to Alor, stopping to dive along the way at many islands, the most important of which of course is Manuk. The island is aptly named: Manuk means “bird” in several Indonesian dialects. And birds it has! Manuk is completely uninhabited and there are a few reasons why. First of all, it’s kind of steep. But more importantly, it’s an active volcano! There are steam and sulfur vents all over the island. It swims casually by flapping its flattened, paddle-like section of tail. Sea snakes are among the most venomous animals on Earth. They use this venom to hunt, and fortunately, attacks on people are extremely rare. Soon I start to see other sea snakes, and I realize that more and more have been appearing. Were they here before and I didn’t see them, or did they come out from someplace? Clearly, some were sleeping. This one is taking a nap in plain view on the reef. I guess they don’t really have to worry about predators. I watch this one sleep for a little while, and start to wonder if it’s even alive. Pretty soon I notice that as the snakes are waking up, they are coming over to check me out. Like land snakes, this is how a sea snake “smells” but at the same time, the tongue flicking helps get rid of excess salt from glands in its mouth. Because sea snakes are reptiles just like land snakes, they have lungs and need to breathe air just like people. So a sea snake must head to the surface every once in a while for a breath. Sea snakes have a huge lung that takes up nearly the entire length of their bodies so they can hold a big breath that will last a while. Each time a sea snake surfaces, it usually spends a minute or two resting and breathing, before gulping in that last big breath and diving back down to the reef. A breath can last 1-2 hours depending on the species, but most sea snakes breathe more often than that unless they are sleeping. They can also absorb a little bit of oxygen from the water directly through their skin, which helps them extend their dives. The next morning I’m up at sunrise, and heading out to the reef for an early morning dive. Early morning is when the sea snakes hunt, and I’m hoping to witness the reef alive with sea snakes on the prowl! Underwater, the light levels are still low, and I’m heading out to a deep seamount where I saw a lot of sea snakes yesterday. This should be a good place to find some sea snakes hunting. When a sea snake hunts, it takes advantage of having a small head and a thin body to go from hole to hole in the reef, poking its head inside. It hopes to corner a fish or invertebrate that’s hiding in the hole. Once the hunting starts, more sea snakes start coming in to the reef to join the hunt. On this seamount more than a hundred feet from the surface, dozens of sea snakes are gathering to prowl the reef for food. Sometimes, they appear to work together to make sure nothing escapes.
Views: 3656869 BlueWorldTV
World's longest sea bridge! Hong Kong-Zhuhai-Macao Bridge to boost logistics
 
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Bridge of opportunity: The Hong Kong-Zhuhai-Macao Bridge is expected to boost logistics in the Pearl River Delta region, after it opens to traffic later this week. Follow us on: YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/user/ChinaViewTV Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/XinhuaNewsAg... Twitter: https://twitter.com/xhnews Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/chinaxinhua... Xinhuanet: http://www.xinhuanet.com/english/
Views: 1703884 New China TV
50 kinds of beautiful fish around the world-Top 50 Amazing sea fish in the world -Shark Attacked
 
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50 kind of fish around the world 50 kinds of beautiful fish around the world-Top 50 Amazing sea fish in the world -Shark Attacked
Views: 32760 Easy Street Food
I Crossed Countries by Sea in a Zorb Ball & You Won't Believe What Happened (Zorb at Sea Challenge)
 
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After I spent the night on a lake in a zorb ball and it was insane (sleep on a lake challenge) I decided to step it up a notch by attempting to crossed countries by sea in the same zorb ball! I try to survive in the zorb ball while crossing from the UK to france, I also tried to sleep! I call this the zorb at sea challenge and you won't believe what happened… Twitter: http://twitter.com/tomstanniland subscribe if you want
Views: 34457441 Killem
He Spent 157 Days Swimming in the Open Sea! Look What Has Become of Him
 
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For copyright matters please contact us at: [email protected] BRAIN TIME ► https://goo.gl/tTWgH2 There are people in the world who can be an inspiration and example to others. And for this they don't have to make great discoveries or compose symphonies. They simply do absolutely incredible things in a different way. They challenge themselves and the forces of nature to show that the human body is capable of great things. Seeing these characters in action is more interesting than any popular television series. But, like any good series, these stories are still great if you see them some time after they appear. So who are these people who have achieved the impossible?
Views: 4460600 #Mind Warehouse
Sailing Around the World: Storm on the South China Sea - SailingWithAndy Ep. #17
 
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Update (Jan. 22, 2018) : S/V Cascadia is currently for sale! After achieving one of my life's greatest accomplishments, I have started a new chapter in my life in Tokyo! Therefore, it is time for Cascadia to help some other lucky individuals achieve their dreams as well :) You can click on the following link or visit my website to learn more! http://sailingwithandy.com/sv-cascadia-sale/ Cascadia and I head deep into the wild jungle of Borneo via the Rajang River Delta, then embark on our passage across the South China Sea where we run into a bit of weather and shred the headsail. Although Cascadia limped into Malaysia, I'm all smiles as we log our 10,000th mile sailed for the year!! You can connect with me on Facebook and Instagram at the following links: https://www.facebook.com/sailingwithandy https://www.instagram.com/sailingwithandy If you have any questions or would like more information about sailing or my adventure, please leave a comment, message me on my website or via my satellite tracker if I am currently sailing. Fair Winds! Music by: bensound.com Sappheiros "Beyond" (remake) Wanderflux "Sunken" feat. Kidwaste and Nori
Views: 36091 SailingWithAndy
Sea-Doo Fun Runs Around The World
 
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We asked for your most amazing #SeaDooLife moments, and you delivered big, incredible moments from all points across the globe! You made this video possible and we thank you – now time to watch as Sea-Doo fun runs around the world! And you, where in the world is YOUR ultimate Sea-Doo destination? Visit http://sea-doo.com/ ___________________________________________ Follow us Facebook: https://facebook.com/SeaDoo Twitter: https://twitter.com/BRPSeaDoo Instagram: http://instagram.com/BRPSeaDoo
Views: 17679 seadootv
The Great Pacific Garbage Patch Is Not What You Think It Is | The Swim
 
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It's not an island twice the size of Texas. But it is severely impacting marine life and human health... and incredibly hard to study. How Millions of Microscopic Fibers Are Ending Up in Our Bodies - https://youtu.be/Bbg0L7JN15U Read More What Happens to the Plastic We Throw Out https://www.nationalgeographic.com/magazine/2018/06/the-journey-of-plastic-around-the-globe/ "Henderson Island is a tiny, uninhabited island in the middle of the Pacific Ocean, 3,000 miles from major population centers. Though it is half the size of Manhattan, more than 19 tons of trash litter its white, sandy beaches. Researchers estimate that it has the highest concentration of debris of any place in the world, for a total of over 37 million pieces on the entirety of the small island. For every square meter you walk, on average you’ll find 672 pieces of trash. For each visible piece of debris on the beach in the video above, two pieces are buried in the sand. How does so much trash wash ashore on Henderson Island?" We know ocean plastic is a problem. We can’t fix it until we answer these 5 questions. https://www.vox.com/science-and-health/2018/7/3/17514172/how-much-plastic-is-in-the-ocean-2018 "Ocean plastic has, in a pretty short time, become a surprisingly potent international environmental movement.For one, there’s more awareness now about the astounding quantity of plastic — between 4.7 and 12.8 million metric tons — floating around in the ocean. As the World Economic Forum put it, this volume is 'equivalent to dumping the contents of one garbage truck into the ocean per minute.' But what about large-scale, long-term plastic reduction? Shouldn’t we also be working toward that?" A running list of action on plastic pollution https://www.nationalgeographic.com/environment/2018/07/ocean-plastic-pollution-solutions/ "THE WORLD HAS a plastic pollution problem and it’s snowballing—but so is public awareness and action. Each year, an estimated 18 billion pounds of plastic waste enters the world’s ocean from coastal regions. That’s about equivalent to five grocery bags of plastic trash piled up on every foot of coastline on the planet. New research is emerging apace about the possible long-term impacts of tiny pieces of plastic on the marine food chain—raising fresh questions about how it might ultimately impact human health and food security. The world is waking up to a crisis of ocean plastic—and we're tracking the developments and solutions as they happen." ____________________ Ben Lecomte's historic swim across the Pacific Ocean is a feat that can’t be missed. Join us as we dive into the most extensive data set of the Pacific Ocean ever collected. Learn about the technology the Seeker crew is using to deter sharks away from Ben and measure the impact of the long-distance swim on his mind and body. Ben's core mission is to raise awareness for ocean health issues, so we’ll investigate key topics such as pollution and plastics as he swims closer to the Great Pacific Garbage Patch, discover potential consequences from climate change, and examine how factors like ocean currents can impact his progress along the way. Seeker explains every aspect of our world through a lens of science, inspiring a new generation of curious minds who want to know how today’s discoveries in science, math, engineering and technology are impacting our lives, and shaping our future. Our stories parse meaning from the noise in a world of rapidly changing information. Subscribe now! http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=dnewschannel Seeker on Twitter http://twitter.com/seeker Seeker on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/SeekerMedia/ Seeker http://www.seeker.com/ Discovery on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/Discovery/ Nomadica Films http://www.nomadicafilms.com/
Views: 2108743 Seeker
Sea Stars | JONATHAN BIRD'S BLUE WORLD
 
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At first glance, starfish, more properly called sea stars, aren't doing much of anything. But Jonathan's investigations reveal a slow-motion predator that hunts and attacks its prey. Traveling the world, Jonathan investigates sea stars from the tropics to the Antarctic and uses time-lapse photography to reveal an amazing complexity to the world of the sea star. ********************************************************************** If you like Jonathan Bird's Blue World, don't forget to subscribe! You can buy some Blue World T-shirts & Swag! http://www.blueworldtv.com/shop You can join us on Facebook! https://www.facebook.com/BlueWorldTV Twitter https://twitter.com/BlueWorld_TV Instagram @blueworldtv Web: http://www.blueworldTV.com ********************************************************************** You might not think of sea stars as being very intelligent, and you’d be right, but you might be impressed by some of the amazing things they can do, especially considering they don’t have a brain! Starfish, more correctly called sea stars, live just about everywhere in the ocean, from the tropics, to Antarctica and everywhere in between. They come in all shapes and sizes from fat and stubby… to long and skinny. This brittle star walks with a coordinated effort using its rays like legs. But most sea stars get around using hundreds or thousands of tiny tube feet on their underside. This is a Northern Sea star, living in the coastal waters of New England, and it’s a predator. It’s hunting a scallop. It’s a drama played out in slow motion as the sea star moves in for a grip on the scallop’s shell. But the scallop is not defenseless. With a mighty blast of water, the scallop jets away to safety. So the sea star wraps itself around a mussel. Mussels are attached to the bottom and can’t get away. The sea star uses it’s strong tube feet with suction cups to pull the mussel open a tiny bit, and digests its victim by injecting its stomach inside the mussel. Picking up the sea star, I can see that it has the mussel firmly in its grip. But not all sea stars feed on mussels and scallops. A Basket star feeds on plankton in the water. It has finely branched arms that act like a net, to catch the tiny bits of food floating by. It positions itself to be able to grab as much plankton as possible in the current. Exploring a reef in the tropical Pacific, I find a Crown-of-thorns sea star dining on the coral. This thorny, armored sea star is one of only a few animals that can digest living coral. It wraps itself around a coral colony and eats the polyps, leaving a dead, bleached coral skeleton behind. Here’s a healthy colony of plate coral. And here’s one that has been eaten by a crown-of-thorns. Outbreaks of these sea stars have been known to kill entire reefs. Carefully picking one up to avoid the sharp and venomous spines, I can see the stomach, which the sea star inverts out of its mouth to digest the coral outside of its body. These sea stars are the second largest in the world, growing bigger than a dinner plate. But if you think these are big, wait until you see the largest sea star in the world! To find it, I've come all the way to British Columbia. I'm looking for the Giant Sun Star, and you won't believe the size of this thing! In the cold, murky waters of the Canadian north Pacific, I swim through beautiful gardens of sponges, anemones and soft coral, searching for a Giant Sun star. And then, down on the bottom, I find what I’m looking for. It has up to 24 arms, more properly called rays and reaches 3 feet across. This is the world’s largest sea star! Compared to most sea stars, the Giant Sun Star is a speed demon, cruising along the bottom in search of its favorite food—other sea stars and the occasional sea cucumber! Here, a sea cucumber makes an emergency retreat to escape this hungry Sun Star on the move! A thousand miles south on a reef in the tropics, I find a blue Linckia sea star on the bottom. Like the vast majority of sea stars, this one has only 5 rays. With tiny tube feet on its underside, this sea star barely seems to move, but when I speed things up with time lapse photography, Linckia sea stars appear very active, moving about and grazing the bottom for food. But even more curiously, they are polite, restraining from walking on top of each other. Like bumper cars, when one Linckia touches another, they each go the other direction. It’s all very civilized. In an hour, a Linckia on the move can travel several car lengths.
Views: 721855 BlueWorldTV
The World After Sea-Level Rise
 
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A flyover animation of cities underwater after the climate warms four degrees and the oceans rise. Global warming: effects of 2º vs 4º. President Donald Trump's policies may lock us into 4º of warming. FB for daily news: http://www.facebook.com/thedailyconversation http://www.twitter.com/thedailyconvo Subscribe to TDC: https://www.youtube.com/TheDailyConversation/ Clips courtesy of Climate Central: http://www.climatecentral.org/ Video edited by Robin West Produced by Bryce Plank
Views: 184659 The Daily Conversation
THE MOST EXTREME Storm Footage - Tornado, Hurricane, Hailstorm [VIDEOS]
 
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Extreme tornadoes caught on tape, hurricane videos, hailstorm videos, sandstorm videos form inside the powerful storms in this extreme weather caught on tape compilation. Subscribe for more 👉 https://tinyurl.com/yavj3ph6
Views: 10619401 Viral Maniacs
Biggest Sea Creatures in the WORLD
 
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There are millions of different animal species in the ocean, but only a few hold the distinction of being some of the largest sea creatures on the planet. Here you’ll see enormous squid, massive sharks, and whales that could dwarf even the most monstrous things we could ever imagine. These are the largest of the large water animals. These are the Biggest Sea Creatures in the World. Learn about the BIGGEST of everything Monday, Wednesday, and Friday just subscribe! 7. Colossal Squid These scarily large squids are also often called the Cranch Squid or the Antarctic Squid, and they’re thought to be the largest squid species by mass on Earth. They inhabit pretty much the entire Southern Ocean, from thousands of miles north of Antarctica to southern South Africa, New Zealand, and South America. As of now, estimates put their maximum size somewhere between 39 and 46 feet (12-14 meters) in length and their max weight around 1,650 pounds (750 kilograms). Do you want to hear something else that’s scary about them? Their limbs are lined with sharp, swiveling hooks, which they’re thought to use for hunting and protection. Yikes. 6. Basking Shark This big ol’ shark is the second largest living shark on the planet, behind just the whale shark. Said whale shark, the megamouth shark, and the basking shark are the only three plankton-eating shark species. They use their vast, gaping mouths to corral and ingest the plankton, which they filter from the water with their gills. The largest ever found specimen of basking shark was located in the Bay of Fundy in Canada back in 1851. The shark measured 40.3 feet (12.27 meters) and weighed roughly 18 short tons (16 long tons). On average, though, the sharks measure around 20 to 26 feet (6-8 meters) and weigh just 5.7 short tons (5.1 long tons). 5. Whale Shark These slow swimming sharks are the largest extant fish species and are classified as filter-feeding carpet sharks. That means that they filter particles and small animals such as plankton, fish eggs, krill, copepods, and more from the water to keep themselves fed and full. The big animals are found in basically all of the temperate and tropical seas all over the world, but don’t worry; even though these sharks are enormous, they pose no real threat to humans. In fact, younger whale sharks are known for being gentle and even playing around with divers. The average adult whale shark measures around 32 feet (9.8 meters) and 20,000 pounds (9 tons). The largest ever specimen caught was 41.5 feet (12.65 meters) long and weighed 47,000 pounds (21.5 tons), and it was caught in Karachi, Pakistan, near Baba Island on November 11, 1949. 4. Oarfish The next fish we’re going to look at belongs to the very small family Regalecidae, and are large, elongated lampriform fish that are typically found in the pelagic zone. They’re located in most tropical and temperate oceans around the world but are rarely seen by humans. There are three different kinds of oarfish, but the giant oarfish is what we’re focusing on here as it’s the longest bony fish on Earth and grows to around 36 feet (11 meters) in length. There are, however, unconfirmed reports of oarfish reaching 56 feet (17 meters) long and weighing upwards of 600 pounds (270 kg)! They eat shrimp, plankton, euphausiids, and other crustaceans. 3. Sperm Whale Also known as the cachalot, the sperm whale is the largest toothed predator and the largest of the toothed whales. They have an extensive range and migrate all over the place for breeding and feeding seasonally, and they don’t stay in one place for too long. Mature males usually grow to be around 52 feet (16 meters) long, although some can reach up to 67 feet (20.5 meters). Did you know that the head of the sperm whale makes up approximately one-third its total length? What a strange looking creature. In history, they’ve been said to be bigger than the 67 feet that they can reach today. The Nantucket Whaling Museum claims they have the 18-foot jawbone of a creature that once spanned 80 feet (24 meters). The whale that sank the Essex, an American whaling ship, in 1820, was thought to be 85 feet (26 meters) long. 2. Lion’s Mane Jellyfish This supremely big jellyfish is also known by the names hair jelly and giant jellyfish, and it’s the largest known jellyfish in the world. It's generally bound to the northern Pacific Ocean, northern Atlantic, and the boreal waters of the Arctic. The jellyfish found in the far north are typically significantly larger than those found farther south, with a bell diameter of 6 feet 7 inches (2 meters) versus just 20 inches (50 centimeters). They also have long, thin tentacles that can reach up and over 100 feet (30 meters) or more, and the specimen with the longest tentacles we know of came in at 120 feet (37 meters). They’re often found measuring longer than blue whales, so they have the distinction of being one of the longest animals in the world. 1...
Views: 3109 The BIGGEST
This is what sea level rise will do to coastal cities
 
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Sea level rise is already redrawing coastlines around the world. What happens when the coast retreats through a major city? We look at how the world map will change in the year 2100, and what coastal cities can do to defend themselves. Correction: An early version of this video suggested that researchers expect to see four feet of sea level rise by the end of the century. While researchers do expect to see at least that level of sea level rise in the future, the exact timing is difficult to project. We regret the error. Read more here: http://bit.ly/2ZwP5Se You can learn more about Surging Seas and check how sea level rise may affect you here: http://ss2.climatecentral.org Subscribe: http://bit.ly/2FqJZMl Like Verge Science on Facebook: http://bit.ly/2hoSukO Follow on Twitter: http://bit.ly/2Kr29B9 Follow on Instagram: https://goo.gl/7ZeLvX Read More: http://www.theverge.com Community guidelines: http://bit.ly/2D0hlAv Subscribe to Verge on YouTube for explainers, product reviews, technology news, and more: http://goo.gl/G5RXGs
Views: 420840 Verge Science
Mutant Fish Taking Over Waters Around the World
 
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All around the world, bizarre mutant fish creatures are being reeled in, and it's doubtful that their captors would describe their catches as “normal”. Here are 10 Mutant Fish Taking Over Waters Around the World. Subscribe for more! ► https://goo.gl/pgcoq1 ◄ Stay updated ► https://goo.gl/JyGcTt https://goo.gl/5c8dzr ◄ For copyright queries or general inquiries please get in touch: [email protected] Credit: https://pastebin.com/vVD8yUA9
Views: 2281950 BE AMAZED
Attempted robbery! - The darker side of sailing around the world! Sailing Vessel Delos Ep. 127
 
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Sailing around the world also has its darker moments… In this episode the crew deal with a local in Madagascar trying to steal Maggie, the beloved dinghy, in the middle of the night. We go on a man hunt and try and bring the thief to justice! For more sailing around the World Action! Join the SV Delos Tribe! http://svdelos.com/camera - Camera gear! http://patreon.com/svdelos - Support us on Patreon for unseen footage. http://svdelos.com - Subscribe to our new awesome website http://instagram.com/svdelos - Follow us on Instagram for more behind the scenes footage http://facebook.com/svdelos - Like us on Facebook http://svdelos.com/beer - If you like what you see send us a cold one ;) http://svdelos.com/gear/ - Support us buy a sweet Delos T-shirt! Send Us Love We LOVE sailing, we LOVE traveling, and we LOVE making videos about it! We're only half-way around the world, so there's plenty more to see! Your support will fund better camera gear, internet to upload videos, and of course creative lubricants to smooth the editing process :) Support Our Videos- Buy us a cold one. http://svdelos.com/beer This is made possible by YOU! So thank you so much for all the love and support you guys are sending us! It means a lot! Much Love, Karin, Brian and Brady Tunes: 00:39 - Ramukanji by Onetox (youtube.com) Throughout entire video - Cinematic Tunes by Kevin MacLeod ( www.incompetech.com ) 31:45 - Catch and release (cover) by Madagangsta ( www.youtube.com/geitanmusic )
Views: 1487856 Sailing SV Delos
The Devil's Sea: Beyond the Bermuda Triangle | FULL LENGTH | MagellanTV
 
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WATCH NEW RELATED CONTENT IN 4K on MagellanTV "TONY ROBINSON: GODS AND MONSTERS" In this series, famed British host Tony Robinson takes us through 2,000 years of history to explore occult practices from brutal human sacrifices in Iron Age Britain to the horrifying witch-hunts and exorcisms of the 16th and 17th centuries. What dark corners of our history will Tony unveil? https://magellan.tv/godsandmonsters "ANOMALY: HAUNTING STORIES OF PARANORMAL INVESTIGATION" It's northern Florida. A group of paranormal investigators enters the old Castle Warden Hotel and a local fire department to investigate spiritual anomalies reported by local people. They scrutinize the stories told around town, look at previously gathered evidence and explore the dark corners of these haunted sites. https://magellan.tv/anomaly Why have so many ships met their doom in the sea off the south coast of Japan? Could this stretch of water be the Bermuda Triangle of the Pacific? One man sets out to find a long lost wreck, and separate fact from fantasy as he explores The Devil’s Sea. PREVIEW our other award-winning paranormal and mystery documentaries without commitment https://www.magellantv.com/genres/crime-and-mystery Here at MagellanTV it is our mission to bring you the finest documentaries from around the world. With over 2000 streaming titles ranging in subject from science and space to nature and history, we hope to broaden your mind by introducing you to a world of educational and entertaining content. We believe in the power of telling real stories that have defined the human experience and point the way to the future. We call it: Documentaries worth watching. SUBSCRIBE TO MagellanTV Check out all 2000+ premium documentaries today with MagellanTV. Start your free trial, then continue watching for as little as $4.99 / mo. LEARN MORE AT: https://magellan.tv/watchnow FOLLOW US ON SOCIAL Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MagellanTV/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/MagellanTVDocs EXPLORE DIFFERENT GENRES Science: http://magellan.tv/explorescience Natural World: http://magellan.tv/explorenaturalworld History: http://magellan.tv/explorehistory Human Spirit: http://magellan.tv/explorehumanspirit The Dark Side: http://magellan.tv/explorethedarkside READ CAPTIVATING ARTICLES http://magellan.tv/explorearticles
Views: 935150 MagellanTV
Biggest Sea Monsters Ever
 
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Click the link to subscribe: http://bit.ly/FactsVerse For copyright matters please contact us at: [email protected] Subscribe to our channel: http://bit.ly/FactsVerse Our Social Media: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/FactsVerse Twitter: https://twitter.com/FactsVerse Instagram: https://instagram.com/factsverse/ For more videos and articles visit: http://factsverse.com Music By : Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 Image Credits : Narrated by : Darren Marlar www.MarlarHouse.com *If you click the above link, we may earn a small affiliate commission
Views: 7144900 Facts Verse
Amazing Sea Animals All Around the World
 
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On this adventure, we visit our local nature center. Tune in for the next video to take a look inside Aiden's animal pad and sketchbook. Artwork: http://twitter.com/blahneri Link to donate to Aiden's college fund: https://www.gofundme.com/3w2qvio
Views: 18730 Aiden The Zoologist
Net Fishing - Most Satisfying Big Catch Fishing At Sea With Beautiful Natural
 
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Net Fishing - Most Satisfying Big Catch Fishing At Sea With Beautiful Natura Welcome To Channel World Food...!!!! Our Channel Contents: Food Processing Machines, Food Processing Technology, Street Food, Sea Food ..Recipe Cook All Kinds of Dishes From All Around The World If You Enjoy Our Videos Please Please SUBSCRIBE And SHARE Channel
Views: 7538096 World Food
Trick For Countries around Mediterranean Sea
 
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Trick To Remember Countries Surrounding The Mediterranean Sea 1 Minute Trick To Remember Countries Around Caspian Sea https://youtu.be/EJ5BxCt9BVM Other World Geography Tricks Trick To Remember Countries Drained By Amazon River Anticlockwise https://youtu.be/mNAzsS4sIJM Trick To Remember Countries Surrounding BALTIC Sea https://youtu.be/tNtUgOeZ7aQ
Views: 63455 TRICKS
10 Biggest Sea Dinosaurs That Ever Existed on Earth
 
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Whatever lives in the sea nowadays can't be compared with the huge monsters that dominated the depths millions of years ago. And by “monsters” we mean long-extinct marine reptiles and dinosaurs. Since many people are better acquainted with the land-roaming giants of the past, this video will open your eyes to those that ruled the waters! Did you know, for example, that pliosauruses were real giants, with the largest species weighing more than 30 tons and growing up to 40 feet long? Also, this animal had an incredibly strong bite. In fact, it was four times more powerful than that of the mighty T-rex! TIMESTAMPS: Pliosaurus 1:14 Kronosaurus 2:15 Nothosaurus 3:07 Styxosaurus 4:10 Albertonectes 5:15 Thalassomedon 6:16 Tylosaurus 7:23 Shonisaurus 8:07 Mosasaurus 9:00 Shastasaurus 9:53 #dinosaurs #prehistoricanimals #seacreatures Music by Epidemic Sound https://www.epidemicsound.com/ SUMMARY: - The largest Kronosaurus ever found was 34 feet long from snout to tail and likely weighed about 12 tons. This marine reptile’s teeth weren't really deadly; they were only a few inches long and not all that sharp. - . Some experts state that Nothosauruses could snap their long heads sideways to catch a passing fish, kinda like how a crocodile does. Surprisingly, researchers say that these reptiles shared a lot of similar features with the modern sea lion. - The Styxosaurus belonged to the Plesiosaur family and lived during the Late Cretaceous Period, around 85 to 70 million years ago. Styxosauruses were about 35 feet in length, but over 16 feet of that consisted just of their long snake-like neck! They had a comparatively small body and weighed approximately 4 tons. - The Albertonectes was another representative of the Plesiosaur family, meaning that this marine reptile had a small head on an incredibly long neck and large flipper-like limbs that helped it move through the water. These creatures occupied the seas around North America 76 to 70 million years ago. - Thalassomedon means “sea lord” in ancient Greek, and there's a pretty good reason behind this name. These representatives of the Plesiosaur family were huge predators that could reach 40 feet in length. That’s about as big as 4-story building! - The Tylosaurus belonged to the Mosasaur family. It dominated the shallow seas of North America about 85 to 80 million years ago. This was an enormous predator, with the biggest representatives reaching 45 feet in length. - The Shonisaurus lived on our planet during the Late Triassic Period, approximately 215 million years ago. The remains of this creature were first discovered in Nevada in 1920, not far from the Shoshone Mountains. This prehistoric reptile resembled a huge chubby dolphin. - The Mosasaurus is a truly gigantic predator that dominated the seas all over the world about 66 million years ago. According to fossil evidence, some specimens could be more than 50 feet in length. This fact makes the Mosasaurus the biggest marine carnivore of its time. - The Shastasaurus is the biggest marine reptile that has ever existed. These predators lived during the Late Triassic Period about 210 million years ago. Subscribe to Bright Side : https://goo.gl/rQTJZz ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Our Social Media: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/brightside/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/brightgram/ 5-Minute Crafts Youtube: https://www.goo.gl/8JVmuC ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- For more videos and articles visit: http://www.brightside.me/
Views: 1095934 BRIGHT SIDE
Sea of Gallile,  traveling around the world...
 
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---(Subtitles/CC: Bosnian, Croatian, English, German, Serbian)--- 00:00 Intro 00:38 Capernaum 02:17 House of St. Peter (In Capernaum) 03:19 Peter's Primacy Church 06:08 The Church of the Multiplication of the Loaves and Fish 07:24 Mount of Beatitudes. 09:45 Korazin (ancient city) 10:25 Kursi (Byzantine monastery-Miracle of the Swine) 11:28 Yardenit (Jordan river-place where Jesus got baptized) 11:55 I am getting baptized in Yardenit 12:25 Christian song in Hebrow 13:22 Thanks for watching Follow me on Facebook and Instagram to know always where I am now Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/pierre.statue.serbia/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/pierrestatue/ If you would like donate for my traveling you can do it in PayPal account. PayPal: [email protected] If you like my video and you would like that other people from your country be able to understand it, please try to translate it to your language. Click settings, Subtitles/CC and Add Subtitle :)
Views: 597 Serbian Traveler
What would you do, in case of a Pirate Attack at Sea? (Sailing La Vagabonde) Ep. 39
 
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More about the pirate scare! Please comment and let us know what you would do in the case of a pirate attack out at sea. The next 150nm of ocean until we reached the Galapagos Islands was quite enjoyable. We saw the most incredible things in the water, I started hearing things and Riley got a tiny little crab in his ear after scraping the hull. Each day we spend on the water these days seems to be full of surprises. As the sun was rising, I spotted the island of San Cristobal. Seals galore. They stuffed up my salad (A SALAD) and the world gets to see grumpy Elayna. Muddy shoe walkers leaving muddy tracks onboard. Surrounded by bird watching/explorer humans in cargo gear. I wonder what adventures tomorrow may bring. Thanks for watching, and for those on Patreon supporting my art. I am seriously stoked on making these videos for you guys and I wouldn’t be able to keep on doing it without you!! Lots of love, Elayna. Want the chance to come aboard/unseen footage privileges? Please become a Patron and support our art! http://www.patreon.com/LaVagabonde Download Elaynas album here! http://elaynac.bandcamp.com/releases Follow us on Instagram for more up to date locations on La Vaga! http://www.instagram.com/elayna__c/ Pick up some official La Vaga merch and help support our journey! http://shop-lavagabonde.com Subscribe to our new sexy website for blog posts and updates! http://www.sailing-lavagabonde.com Like us on Facebook! http://www.facebook.com/SailingLaVagabonde Follow us on Twitter! http://twitter.com/@sailing_lavaga Like Elaynas Music page on the book! http://www.facebook.com/elaynacmusic Song Credits: 00:07 Keisuke Yoshiura - Rain Calls Me 05:16 This Forest was Once on Fire - Andrew Rothschild 06:14 Tropical Vibe - Micheal Howland 07:17 Alone - Dead Leaves 08:20 First Bloom of Spring - Andrew Rothschild 09:10 Ben Vernon - Train Song (is it just me, or does this song make you extremely happy??! Cheers Ben!! Salsa - No Watermark (Royalty Free track from Audio Jungle) 12:09 Come the Morning - Getgogetter 13:00 Fortunes - Energy Thanks a million to all of our subscribers following our voyage and especially for those supporting us on Patreon! With your support, we can keep the movies coming and continue sailing around the world and sharing this incredible adventure with you all. Its really is HUGELY appreciated. There aren't enough kind and generous people like you guys out there in this world. Thank you guys so much. Love Elayna & Riley Sailing La Vagabonde.
Views: 943518 Sailing La Vagabonde
Internet Under the Sea - Cables Damage Problem? Internet Cables Protection?
 
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Namaskaar Dosto, is video mein maine aapse Under sea cables ke baare mein baat ki hai, Internet kaise kaam karte hai aur kaise fiber cables ko damage pahuchne pe internet ko nuksaan hoga, yahi sab maine aapko is video mein banaya hai. Mujhe umeed hai ki aapko under sea cables ke baare mein yeh video pasand aayega. Share, Support, Subscribe!!! Subscribe: http://bit.ly/1Wfsvt4 Android App: https://technicalguruji.in/app Youtube: http://www.youtube.com/c/TechnicalGuruji Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/technicalguruji Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/technicalguruji Facebook Myself: https://goo.gl/zUfbUU Instagram: http://instagram.com/technicalguruji Google Plus: https://plus.google.com/+TechnicalGuruji Website: https://technicalguruji.in/ Merchandise: http://shop.technicalguruji.in/ About : Technical Guruji is a YouTube Channel, where you will find technological videos in Hindi, New Video is Posted Everyday :)
Views: 314139 Technical Guruji
Conan Floats In The Dead Sea  - CONAN on TBS
 
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Conan learns that he looks better covered in mud than shirtless. More CONAN @ http://teamcoco.com/video Team Coco is the official YouTube channel of late night host Conan O'Brien, CONAN on TBS & TeamCoco.com. Subscribe now to be updated on the latest videos: http://bit.ly/W5wt5D For Full Episodes of CONAN on TBS, visit http://teamcoco.com/video Get Social With Team Coco: On Facebook: ‪https://www.facebook.com/TeamCoco‬ On Google+: https://plus.google.com/+TeamCoco/ On Twitter: http://twitter.com/TeamCoco On Tumblr: http://teamcoco.tumblr.com On YouTube: http://youtube.com/teamcoco Follow Conan O'Brien on Twitter: http://twitter.com/ConanOBrien
Views: 8762041 Team Coco
Big Catch Fishing in The Deep Sea With Big Boat - Amazing Tuna Fish Processing Skill
 
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Big Catch Fishing in The Deep Sea With Big Boat - Amazing Tuna Fish Processing Process........................ Welcome To Channel World Food...!!!! Our Channel Contents: Food Processing Machines, Food Processing Technology, Street Food, Sea Food ..Recipe Cook All Kinds of Dishes From All Around The World If You Enjoy Our Videos Please Please SUBSCRIBE And SHARE Channel
Views: 10162890 World Food
The Most Satisfying Big Catch In The Deep Sea With Net - Lot Of Live Fish Catching At Sea
 
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The Most Satisfying Big Catch in The Deep Sea With Net - Lot Of Live Fish Catching At Sea Welcome To Channel World Food...!!!! Our Channel Contents: Food Processing Machines, Food Processing Technology, Street Food, Sea Food ..Recipe Cook All Kinds of Dishes From All Around The World If You Enjoy Our Videos Please Please SUBSCRIBE And SHARE Channel
Views: 1128042 World Food
The Little Mermaid - Under the Sea (Official Video)
 
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Walt Disney Records: The Legacy Collection – The Little Mermaid is available now! Get it here: http://smarturl.it/lclma1 Play along with "Under the Sea" here: https://youtu.be/Aa5agKAacPc Strum along here: https://youtu.be/Uw75AereUxk Also available: “Under the Sea” Sheet Music: http://bit.ly/1L7qxq1 “Part Of Your World” Sheet Music: http://bit.ly/1QXZUpY Connect with Disney Music Emporium: Official Site: http://www.disneymusicemporium.com Facebook: http://facebook.com/disneymusicemporium Twitter: https://twitter.com/disneymusicemp Connect with Walt Disney Records: Facebook: http://facebook.com/disneymusic Instagram: http://instagram.com/disneymusic Snapchat: http://snapchat.com/add/disneymusic Twitter: http://twitter.com/disneymusic Music video by Samuel E. Wright performing Under the Sea. (C) 2013 Walt Disney Records #TheLittleMermaid #UnderTheSea #Vevo #DisneyMusic
Views: 139031157 DisneyMusicVEVO