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Louis Armstrong - What A Wonderful World (Original Spoken Intro Version) ABC Records 1967, 1970
 
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"What a Wonderful World" [1970 Spoken Introduction Version] along with Oliver Nelson's Orchestra is a song written by Bob Thiele (as George Douglas) and George David Weiss. It was first recorded by Louis Armstrong and released as a single in 1967. Thiele and Weiss were both prominent in the music world (Thiele as a producer and Weiss as a composer/performer). Armstrong's recording was inducted in the Grammy Hall of Fame in 1999. Intended as an antidote for the increasingly racially and politically charged climate of everyday life in the United States, the song also has a hopeful, optimistic tone with regard to the future, with reference to babies being born into the world and having much to look forward to. The song was initially offered to Tony Bennett, who turned it down. Thereafter, it was offered to Louis Armstrong. Louis Armstrong (August 4, 1901 -- July 6, 1971), nicknamed Satchmo or Pops, was an American jazz trumpeter and singer from New Orleans, Louisiana. Coming to prominence in the 1920s as an "inventive" trumpet and cornet player, Armstrong was a foundational influence in jazz, shifting the focus of the music from collective improvisation to solo performance. With his instantly recognizable gravelly voice, Armstrong was also an influential singer, demonstrating great dexterity as an improviser, bending the lyrics and melody of a song for expressive purposes. He was also skilled at scat singing (vocalizing using sounds and syllables instead of actual lyrics). Renowned for his charismatic stage presence and voice almost as much as for his trumpet-playing, Armstrong's influence extends well beyond jazz music, and by the end of his career in the 1960s, he was widely regarded as a profound influence on popular music in general. Armstrong was one of the first truly popular African-American entertainers to "cross over", whose skin color was secondary to his music in an America that was severely racially divided. He rarely publicly politicized his race, often to the dismay of fellow African-Americans, but took a well-publicized stand for desegregation during the Little Rock Crisis. His artistry and personality allowed him socially acceptable access to the upper echelons of American society that were highly restricted for a black man. Armstrong died of a heart attack in his sleep on July 6, 1971 at the age of 69, 11 months after playing a famous show at the Waldorf-Astoria's Empire Room. He was residing in Corona, Queens, New York City, at the time of his death. He was interred in Flushing Cemetery, Flushing, in Queens, New York City. His honorary pallbearers included Bing Crosby, Ella Fitzgerald, Dizzy Gillespie, Pearl Bailey, Count Basie, Harry James, Frank Sinatra, Ed Sullivan, Earl Wilson, Alan King, Johnny Carson and David Frost. Peggy Lee sang The Lord's Prayer at the services while Al Hibbler sang "Nobody Knows the Trouble I've Seen" and Fred Robbins, a long-time friend, gave the eulogy. Armstrong was posthumously awarded the Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award in 1972 by the Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences. This Special Merit Award is presented by vote of the Recording Academy's National Trustees to performers who, during their lifetimes, have made creative contributions of outstanding artistic significance to the field of recording. Recordings of Armstrong were inducted into the Grammy Hall of Fame, which is a special Grammy award established in 1973 to honor recordings that are at least twenty-five years old, and that have "qualitative or historical significance." "Some of you young folks been saying to me " Hey Pops, what you mean 'What a wonderful world'? How about all them wars all over the place? You call them wonderful? And how about hunger and pollution? That ain't so wonderful either." Well how about listening to old Pops for a minute. Seems to me, it aint the world that's so bad but what we're doin' to it. And all I'm saying is see what a wonderful world It would be if only we'd give it a chance. Love baby, love. That's the secret, yeah. If lots more of us loved each other we'd solve lots more problems. And then this world would be gasser. That's wha' ol' Pops keeps saying." I see trees of green, red roses too I see them bloom, for me and you And I think to myself What a wonderful world I see skies of blue, and clouds of white The bright blessed day, dark sacred night And I think to myself What a wonderful world The colors of the rainbow, so pretty in the sky Are also on the faces, of people going by I see friends shaking hands, sayin', "How do you do?" They're really sayin', "I love you" I hear babies cryin', I watch them grow They'll learn much more, than I'll ever know And I think to myself What a wonderful world Yes, I think to myself What a wonderful world Oh yeah!
Views: 25899806 RoundMidnightTV
Ella Fitzgerald - Stella by Starlight (Verve Records 1961)
 
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"Stella by Starlight" is a jazz standard written by Victor Young and featured in The Uninvited, a 1944 film released by Paramount Pictures. Originally played in the film as an instrumental theme song without lyrics, it was turned over to Ned Washington, who wrote the lyrics for it in 1946. The title had to be incorporated into the lyrics, which resulted in its unusual placement: the phrase appears about three quarters of the way through the song, rather than at the beginning or the end. Ella's accompanied by Lou Levy (p), Herb Ellis (g), Joe Mondragon (b), Stan Levey (d). Recorded June 22, 1961, Los Angeles. (Verve Records) The song a robin sings Through years of endless springs The murmur of a brook at eventide That ripples by a nook where two lovers hide A great symphonic theme That's Stella by starlight and not a dream She's all of these and more She's everything that you'd adore The song a robin sings Through years of endless springs The murmur of a brook at eventide That ripples by a nook where two lovers hide A great symphonic theme That's Stella by starlight and not a dream She's is all of these and more She's everything that you'd adore Have you seen Stella by starlite with moon in her hair That's Stella by starlight raptures so rare She's is all of these and more She's everything that you'd adore
Views: 489132 RoundMidnightTV
Billie Holiday - Love Me or Leave Me (OKeh Records 1941)
 
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"Love Me or Leave Me" is a U.S. popular song from the 1920s. The music was written by Walter Donaldson and the lyrics by Gus Kahn. The song was introduced in the Broadway play, Whoopee!, which opened in December 1928. Ruth Etting's performance of the song was so popular that she was also given the song to sing in the play Simple Simon, which opened in February 1930. Eleanora Fagan (April 7, 1915 – July 17, 1959), professionally known as Billie Holiday, was an American jazz musician and singer-songwriter. Nicknamed "Lady Day" by her friend and music partner Lester Young, Holiday had a seminal influence on jazz music and pop singing. Her vocal style, strongly inspired by jazz instrumentalists, pioneered a new way of manipulating phrasing and tempo. Billie's accompanied by Emmett Berry (tp), Jimmy Hamilton (cl) & (ts), Hymie Schertzer (as), Babe Russin (ts), Teddy Wilson (p), Albert Casey (g), John Williams (b), and J C Heard (ds). Record August 7, 1941. OKeh Records (31004-1) This suspense is killing me I can't stand uncertainty Tell me now I've got to know Whether you want me to stay or go Love me or leave me Or let me be lonely You won't believe me I love you only I'd rather be lonely Then happy with somebody else You might find the nighttime The right time for kissing But nighttime is my time For just reminiscing Regretting Instead of forgetting with somebody else There'll be no one Unless that someone is you I intend to be independently blue I want your love But I don't want to borrow To have it today To give back tomorrow For your love is my love There's no love for nobody else (bridge) There'll be no one Unless that someone is you I intend to be independently blue I want your love But I don't want to borrow To have it today And to give back tomorrow For your love is my love There's no love for nobody else
Views: 1742172 RoundMidnightTV
Yma Sumac - Gopher Mambo (Capitol Records 1954)
 
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Mambo! is the fifth studio album by Peruvian soprano Yma Sumac. It was released on 1954 by Capitol Records. It was entirely composed by Moisés Vivanco. Yma Sumac (September 13, 1922 - November 1, 2008) was a noted Peruvian singer. In the 1950s, she was one of the most famous proponents of exotica music. She became an international success based on her extreme vocal range, which was said to be "well over four octaves" and was sometimes claimed to span even five octaves at her peak. Stories published in the 1950s claimed that she was an Incan princess, directly descended from Atahualpa. Her New York Times obituary reported that "the largest and most persistent fabrication about Ms. Sumac was that she was actually a housewife from Brooklyn named Amy Camus, her name spelled backward. The fact is that the government of Peru in 1946 formally supported her claim to be descended from Atahualpa, the last Incan emperor". Chávarri adopted the stage name of Imma Sumack (also spelled Ymma Sumack and Ima Sumack) before she left South America to go to the United States. The stage name was based on her mother's name, which was derived from Ima Shumaq, Quechua for "how beautiful!" although in interviews she claimed it meant "beautiful flower" or "beautiful girl". Yma Sumac first appeared on radio in 1942. Sumac and orchestra and bandleader Moisés Vianco were married that year. She recorded at least 18 tracks of Peruvian folk songs in Argentina in 1943. These early recordings for the Odeon label featured Moisés Vivanco's group, Compañía Peruana de Arte, a group of 46 Indian dancers, singers, and musicians. In 1946 Sumack and Vivanco moved to New York City, where they performed as the Inka Taky Trio, Sumack singing soprano, Vivanco on guitar, and her cousin Cholita Rivero singing contralto and dancing. She was signed by Capitol Records in 1950, at which time her stage name became Yma Sumac. During the 1950s, Yma Sumac produced a series of lounge music recordings featuring Hollywood-style versions of Incan and South American folk songs, working with the likes of Les Baxter and Billy May. The combination of her extraordinary voice, exotic looks, and stage personality made her a hit with American audiences. Sumac appeared in a Broadway musical, Flahooley, in 1951, as a foreign princess who brings Aladdin's lamp to an American toy factory to have it repaired. The show's score was by Sammy Fain and E. Y. "Yip" Harburg, but Sumac's three numbers were the work of Vivanco with one co-written by Vivanco and Fain. Capitol Records, Sumac's label, recorded the show. Flahooley closed quickly, but the recording continues as a cult classic, in part because it also marked the Broadway debut of Barbara Cook. During the height of Sumac's popularity, she appeared in the films Secret of the Incas (1954) and Omar Khayyam (1957). She became a U.S. citizen on July 22, 1955. In 1959 she performed Jorge Bravo de Rueda's classic song "Vírgenes del Sol" on her album Fuego del Ande. In 1992 Guenter Czernetzky directed a documentary for German television entitled Yma Sumac -- Hollywoods Inkaprinzessin (Yma Sumac -- Hollywood's Inca Princess). With the resurgence of lounge music in the late 1990s, Sumac's profile rose again when the song "Ataypura" was featured in the Coen Brothers film, The Big Lebowski. Her song "Bo Mambo" appeared in a commercial for Kahlúa liquor and was sampled for the song "Hands Up" by The Black Eyed Peas. The song "Gopher Mambo" was used in the films Ordinary Decent Criminal, Dead Husbands, Spy Games, and Confessions of a Dangerous Mind. "Gopher Mambo" was also used in an act of the Cirque Du Soleil show Quidam. The songs "Goomba Boomba" and "Malambo No. 1" appeared in Death to Smoochy. Yma Sumac is also mentioned in the lyrics of the 1980s song Joe le taxi by Vanessa Paradis. Yma Sumac died on November 1, 2008, aged 86 at an assisted-living home in Los Angeles, nine months after being diagnosed with colon cancer. She was interred at the Hollywood Forever Cemetery in Hollywood in the "Sanctuary of Memories" section.
Views: 2400151 RoundMidnightTV
Shirley Horn - Here's To Life (Verve Records 1992)
 
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Here's to Life is a 1992 studio album by Shirley Horn, arranged by Johnny Mandel. Shirley Valerie Horn (May 1, 1934 -- October 20, 2005) was an American jazz singer and pianist. Horn collaborated with many jazz greats including Miles Davis, Dizzy Gillespie, Toots Thielemans, Ron Carter, Carmen McRae, Wynton Marsalis and others. She was most noted for her ability to accompany herself with nearly incomparable independence and ability on the piano while singing, something described by arranger Johnny Mandel as "like having two heads", and for her rich, lush voice, a smoky contralto, which was described by noted producer and arranger Quincy Jones as "like clothing, as she seduces you with her voice". Although she could swing as strongly as any straight-ahead jazz artist, Horn's reputation rode on her exquisite ballad work. Shirley Horn was born and raised in Washington, D.C.. Encouraged by her grandmother, an amateur organist, Horn began piano lessons at the age of four. Aged 12, she studied piano and composition at Howard University, later graduating from there in classical music. Horn was offered a place at the Juilliard School, but her family could not afford to send her there. Horn formed her first jazz piano trio when she was twenty. Horn's early piano influences were Erroll Garner, Oscar Peterson and Ahmad Jamal, and moving away from her classical background, Horn later said that "Oscar Peterson became my Rachmaninov, and Ahmad Jamal became my Debussy." She then became enamored with the famous U Street jazz area of Washington (largely destroyed in the 1968 riots), sneaking into jazz clubs before she was of legal age. Horn first achieved fame in 1960, through her association with Miles Davis. Davis' praise had particular resonance in two respects: because he was so highly respected as a musician, and because he rarely offered public praise for fellow musicians at that time. Horn had, though, recorded several songs with violinist Stuff Smith in 1959 both as a pianist and a singer. After her discovery by Davis, she recorded albums on different small labels in the early 1960s, eventually landing contracts with larger labels Mercury Records and Impulse Records. She was popular with jazz critics, but did not achieve significant popular success. Quincy Jones attempted to make Horn into a pure vocalist in several recording sessions, something he later hinted may have been a mistake. Horn was also disturbed by the changes in popular music in the 1960s following the arrival of The Beatles. Largely rejecting efforts to remake her into a popular singer, she stated: "I will not stoop to conquer". From the late-1960s, she concentrated on raising her daughter Rainy with her husband, Shepherd Deering (whom she had married in 1955), and largely limited her performances to her native Washington, D.C. Miles Davis made a rare appearance as a sideman on Horn's 1991 album You Won't Forget Me. Although she preferred to perform in small settings, such as her trio, she also recorded with orchestras, as on the 1992 album Here's to Life, the title song (lyrics by Phyllis Molinary, music by Artie Butler) of which became her signature song. A video documentary of Horn's life and music was released at the same time as "Here's To Life" and shared its title. At the time, arranger Johnny Mandel commented that Horn's piano skill was comparable to that of the noted jazz great Bill Evans. A follow-up was made in 2001, named You're My Thrill. Shirley Horn kept for twenty five years the same rhythm section: Charles Ables (bass) and Steve Williams (drums). Don Heckman wrote in the Los Angeles Times (February 2, 1995) about "the importance of bassist Charles Ables and drummer Steve Williams to Horn's sound. Working with boundless subtlety, following her every spontaneous twist and turn, they were the ideal accompanists for a performer who clearly will tolerate nothing less than perfection". No complaints and no regrets. I still believe in chasing dreams and placing bets. But i have learned that all you give is all you get So give it all you got. I had my share, I drank my fill, and even though I'm satisfied I'm hungry still To see what's down another road, beyond the hill And do it all again. So here's to life and all the joy it brings. Here's to life for dreamers and their dreams. Funny how the time just flies. How love can go from warm hellos to sad goodbyes And leave you with the memories you've memorized To keep your winters warm. For there's no yes in yesterday. And who knows what tomorrow brings or takes away. As long as I'm still in the game I want to play For laughs, for life, for love. So here's to life and every joy it brings. Here's to life, for dreamers and their dreams. May all your storms be weathered, And all that's good get better. Here's to life, here's to love, here's to you. May all your storms be weathered, And all that's good get better. Here's to life, here's to love, here's to you.
Views: 295688 RoundMidnightTV
Sarah Vaughan - Misty (Live from Sweden) Mercury Records 1964
 
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"Misty" is a jazz standard written in 1954 by the pianist Erroll Garner. Originally composed as an instrumental following the traditional 32-bar format, the tune later had lyrics by Johnny Burke and became the signature song of Johnny Mathis. Sarah's accompanied by Kirk Stuart (piano), Charles "Buster" Williams (bass), and Georges Hughes (drums). Recorded in Sweden, 1964. (Mercury Records) Look at me, I'm as helpless as a kitten up a tree Feel like I'm clinging to a cloud I can't understand, I get misty just holding your hand. Walk my way, And a thousand violins begin to play Might be the sound of your hello That music I hear, I get misty the moment you're near And you can see that you're leading me on And it's just, and it's just what I want you to do Don't you notice how hopelessly I'm lost That's why I'm following you. On my own, Would I wander through this wonderland alone Never knowing my right foot from my left, My hat from my glove, I'm too misty, and too much in love. And you can see that you're leading me on And it's just, and it's just what I want you to do Don't you notice how hopelessly I'm lost That's why I'm following you. On my own, Would I wander through this wonderland alone Never knowing my right foot from my left, My hat from my glove, I'm too misty, and too much in love I get too misty, and too much in love
Views: 1278971 RoundMidnightTV
Sarah Vaughan ft Quincy Jones & His Orchestra - Misty (Mercury Records 1958)
 
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Conducted by Quincy Jones and His Orchestra with Zoot Sims on Saxaphone, "Misty" is a jazz standard written in 1954 by the pianist Erroll Garner. Originally composed as an instrumental following the traditional 32-bar format, the tune later had lyrics by Johnny Burke and became the signature song of Johnny Mathis. This song is from the album "Vaughan and Violins". Sarah's accompanied Quincy Jones & His Orchestra: Marcel Hrasko (alto saxophone), Jo Hrasko &William Boucaya (baritone saxophone), Richard Davis (bass), Kenny Clark (drums), Ronnel Bright (piano), Zoot Sims (tenor saxophone), and Michel Hausser (vibraphone). Recorded in Paris, France July 7, 1958. (Mercury Records) Look at me I'm as helpless as a kitten up a tree And I feel like I'm clinging to a cloud I can't understand I get misty just holding your hand Walk my way And a thousand violins begin to play Or it might be the sound of your hello That music I hear I get misty the moment you're near You can say that you're leading me on But it's just what I want you to do Don't you notice how hopelessly I'm lost That's why I'm following you On my own Would I wander through this wonderland alone Never knowing my right foot from my left My hat from my glove I'm too misty and too much in love I'm just too misty and too much in love
Views: 329537 RoundMidnightTV
Sarah Vaughan ft Count Basie Orchestra - Moonlight In Vermont (Mercury Records 1957)
 
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"Moonlight in Vermont" is a popular song about the U.S. state of Vermont, written by John Blackburn and Karl Suessdorf and published in 1943. The lyrics are unusual in that they do not rhyme. John Blackburn, the lyricist, has been quoted as saying, "After completing the first 12 bars of the lyric, I realized there was no rhyme and then said to Karl, 'Let's follow the pattern of no rhyme throughout the song. It seemed right. "The lyrics are also metrically interesting in that each verse (not counting the bridge) is a haiku. The song is considered an unofficial state song of Vermont and is frequently played as the first dance song at Vermont wedding receptions. There are few, if any, sycamore trees in Vermont and no meadowlarks. Blackburn, from Ohio, who wrote the lyrics, may have imposed his own interpretation of what he saw during his trip to Vermont which inspired the song. Sarah's accompanied by The Count Basie Orchestra. Recorded August 6, 1957. (Mercury Records) Pennies in a stream Falling leaves a sycamore Moonlight in Vermont Gentle finger waves Ski trails down a mountain side Snowlight in Vermont Telegraph cables, they sing down the highway As they travel each bend in the road People who meet in this romantic setting Are so hypnotized by the lovely Evening summer breeze Warbling of the meadowlark Moonlight in Vermont You and I and moonlight in Vermont Telegraph cables, they sing down the highway And travel each bend in the road People who meet in this romantic setting Are so hypnotized by the lovely Evening Summer breeze Warbling, warbling of the meadowlark Moonlight in Vermont You and I and moonlight in Vermont Moonlight in Vermont
Views: 105377 RoundMidnightTV
Dionne Warwick - (There's) Always Something There To Remind Me (Scepter Records 1967)
 
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"(There's) Always Something There to Remind Me" is a song written in the 1960s by songwriting team Burt Bacharach and Hal David. I walk along the city streets You used to walk along with me And every step I take Recalls how much in love we used to be Oh, how can I forget you? When there is always something there to remind me Always something there to remind me I was born to love you and I will never be free You'll always be a part of me, oh When shadows fall, I pass a small cafe Where we would dance at night And I can't help recalling How it felt to kiss and hold you tight Oh, how can I forget you? When there is always something there to remind me Always something there to remind me I was born to love you and I will never be free You'll always be a part of me, oh oh If you should find you miss the sweet And tender love we used to share Just come back to the places Where we used to go and I'll be there Oh, how can I forget you? When there is always something there to remind me When there is always something there to remind me I was born to love you and I will never be free When there is, when there is When there is always something there to remind me Oh, always something there to remind me Oh, always something there to remind me There is always something there to remind me
Views: 165841 RoundMidnightTV
Arthur Ferrante & Louis Teicher - Midnight Cowboy (United Artist Records 1969)
 
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Ferrante & Teicher were a duo of American piano players, known for their light arrangements of familiar classical pieces, movie soundtracks, and show tunes. In 1947, they launched a full-time concert career, at first playing nightclubs, then quickly moving up to playing classical music with orchestral backing. Between 1950 and 1980, they were a major American easy listening act, and scored four big U.S. hits: "Theme From The Apartment" (Pop #10), "Theme From Exodus" (Pop #2), "Tonight" (Pop #8), and "Midnight Cowboy" (Pop #10). They performed and recorded regularly with pops orchestras popular standards by George Gershwin, Jerome Kern, Cole Porter, Richard Rodgers and others. In 1973, they did the Hollywood Radio Theater theme for the Rod Serling radio drama series, The Zero Hour. Midnight Cowboy is a 1969 American drama film based on the 1965 novel of the same name by James Leo Herlihy. The script was written by Waldo Salt, directed by John Schlesinger, and stars Jon Voight in the title role alongside Dustin Hoffman. Notable smaller roles are filled by Sylvia Miles, John McGiver, Brenda Vaccaro, Bob Balaban, Jennifer Salt and Barnard Hughes; M. Emmet Walsh appears in an uncredited cameo. The film won three Academy Awards: Best Picture, Best Director and Best Adapted Screenplay. To date, it is the only X-rated film ever to win Best Picture. It has since been labeled as one of the greatest American movies of all time.
Views: 119688 RoundMidnightTV
Ella Fitzgerald ft Marty Paich & His Orchestra - Desafinado (Verve Records 1962)
 
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"Desafinado", a Portuguese word (usually rendered into English as "Out of Tune", or as "Off Key"), is the title of a bossa nova song composed by Antonio Carlos Jobim with lyrics (in Portuguese) by Newton Mendonça. The English language lyrics were written by Jon Hendricks and Jessie Cavanaugh. Another English lyric, more closely based on the original Portuguese lyric (but not a translation) was written by Gene Lees, and appears on some recordings as well. The version by Stan Getz and Charlie Byrd (from the album Jazz Samba) was a major hit in 1962, reaching 15 and 4 on Billboard's pop and easy-listening charts, respectively; their definitive rendering also reached No 11 in the UK, this version by Ella Fitzgerald ranked number 38 on the charts. Ella's accompanied by Marty Paich & His Orchestra. Recorded at Capitol Studios Hollywood, October 1, 1962. (Verve Records) Love is like a never-ending melody Poets have compared it to a symphony A symphony conducted by the lighting of the moon But our song of love is slightly out of tune Once your kisses raised me to a fever pitch Now the orchestration doesn't seem so rich Seems to me you've changed the tune we used to sing Like the bossa nova, love should swing We used to harmonize, two souls in perfect time Now the song is different and the words don't even rhyme Cause you forgot the melody our hearts would always croon And so what's good's a heart that's slightly out of tune Tune your heart to mine the way it used to be Join with me in harmony and sing a song of loving We've got to get in tune again before too long Ther'll be no desafinado When your heart belongs to me completely Then you won't be slightly out of tune You'll sing along with me Ther'll be no desafinado When your heart belongs to me completely Then you won't be slightly out of tune You'll sing along with me Sing along with me Sing along with me
Views: 95115 RoundMidnightTV
Nancy Wilson - I Wish You Love (Capitol Records 1960)
 
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"I Wish You Love" is a popular song. The music was written by Léo Chauliac, with French lyrics under the title "Que reste-t-il de nos amours ? (translated: "What remains of our love?")" by Charles Trenet. The English title and lyrics are by Albert A. Beach. The original French lyric wistfully evokes memories of happier youthful days. The English version, whilst in no sense a translation of the original, captures a similar air of wistfulness. It was first recorded by Keely Smith in 1957. Nancy Sue Wilson (February 20, 1937 – December 13, 2018) was an American singer whose career spanned over five decades, from the mid–1950s until her retirement in the early–2010s. She was notable for her single "(You Don't Know) How Glad I Am" and her version of the standard "Guess Who I Saw Today". On December 13, 2018, Wilson died at her home in Pioneertown, California after a long illness. She was 81 years old. Nancy's accompanied by Ben Webster (tenor saxophone); Billy May (arranger, conductor); Pete Condoli, Frank Beach, Conrad Gozzo (trumpet); George Roberts, Si Zentner - (trombone); Milt Raskin (piano); Jack Marshall (guitar); Joe Comfort (bass); Shelly Manne (drums); and Emil Richards (vibraphone). I wish you bluebirds in the spring to give your heart a song to sing And then a kiss but more than this I wish you love And in July a lemonade to cool you in some leafy glade I wish you health and more than wealth I wish you love My breaking heart and I agree that you and I could never be So with my best, my very best, I set you free I wish you shelter from the storm A cozy fire to keep you warm But most of all when snowflakes fall I wish you love My breaking heart and I agree that you and I could never be So with my best, my very best, I set you free I wish you shelter from the storm A cozy fire to keep you warm But most of all when snowflakes fall I wish you love But most of all I wish you love
Views: 264640 RoundMidnightTV
Sarah Vaughan - September In The Rain (Live from Sweden) Mercury Records 1958
 
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"September in the Rain" is a popular song by Harry Warren and Al Dubin, published in 1937. The song was introduced by James Melton in the film Melody for Two. It has become a standard, having been recorded by many artists since. In 1962, The Beatles recorded a rock 'n roll interpretation during their famed Decca audition. Sarah's accompanied by Ronnell Bright (piano), Richard Davis (bass), and Art Morgan (drums). Recorded July 9, 1958. (Mercury Records) The leaves of brown, came tumbling down, Remember that September, in the Rain The sun went out just like a dying ember That September in the rain To every word of love I've heard you whisper The raindrops seem to play a sweet refrain. Though spring is here to me it's still September That September in the rain To every word of love I've heard you whisper The raindrops seem to play a sweet refrain Though spring is here to me it's still September That September in the rain September in the rain That September in the rain
Views: 117251 RoundMidnightTV
Sarah Vaughan - Mean To Me (Live from Sweden) Mercury Records 1958
 
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"Mean To Me" is a popular song with music by Fred E. Ahlert and lyrics by Roy Turk, published in 1929. The song is a popular standard, recorded by many artists. Doris Day recorded a version for the 1955 film Love Me or Leave Me. Sarah's accompanied by Ronnell Bright (piano), Richard Davis (bass), and Art Morgan (drums). Recorded July 9, 1958. (Mercury Records) You're mean to me Why must you be mean to me? Gee, honey, it seems to me You love to see me cryin' I don't know why I stay home each night Each day you say you'll phone You don't and I'm left alone. Sing the blues and sighin' You treat me coldly each day in the year You always scold me Whenever somebody is near, dear It must be great fun to be mean to me You shouldn't, for can't you see What you mean to me You're mean to me Why must you be mean to me? Gee, honey, it seems to me You love to see me cryin' I stay home each night When you say you phone You don't and I'm left alone. Sing the blues and sighin' You treat me coldly each day in the year You always scold me Whenever somebody is near, dear It must be great fun to be mean to me Gee honey why can't you see What you mean to me Can't you see what you mean to me
Views: 78395 RoundMidnightTV
Sarah Vaughan with Clifford Brown - Lullaby of Birdland (EmArcy Records 1954)
 
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"Lullaby of Birdland" is a 1952 popular song with music by George Shearing and lyrics by George David Weiss under the pseudonym "B. Y. Forster" in order to circumvent the rule that ASCAP and BMI composers could not collaborate. The title refers to Charlie "Bird" Parker and the Birdland jazz club named after him. The song has been recorded by many vocal and instrumental performers. In Stan Freberg's comic version of "The Great Pretender", the jazz pianist ad libs the first six notes of "Lullaby of Birdland", before the singer angrily shouts "WATCH IT!!" Sarah's accompanied by Leader/Arranger: Ernie Wilkins, Clifford Brown (trumpet), Herbie Mann (flute), Paul Quinichette (tenor), Jimmy Jones (piano), Joe Benjamin (bass), and Roy Haynes (drums). Recorded in New York, December 18, 1954. (EmArcy Records) Lullaby of birdland That's what I Always hear, when you sigh Never in my wordland Could there ways to reveal In a phrase, how I feel Have you ever heard two turtledoves Bill and coo When they love That's the kind of magic music We make with our lips When we kiss And there's a weepy ol' willow He really knows how to cry That's how I cry on my pillow If you should tell me Farewell and goodbye Lullaby of birdland Whisper low Kiss me sweet, and we'll go Flying high in birdland, High in the sky up above All because we're in love Sarah Scats There's a weepy ol' willow He really knows how to cry That's how I cry on my pillow If you should tell me Farewell and goodbye Lullaby of birdland Whisper low Kiss me sweet, and we'll go Flying high in birdland, High in the sky up above All because we're in love
Views: 773436 RoundMidnightTV
Etta Jones - Don't Go To Strangers (Prestige Records 1960)
 
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"Don't Go To Strangers" is a 1954 song by Arthur Kent with lyrics by Redd Evans. Etta Jones was an American jazz singer whose critical success and relative commercial obscurity earned her a reputation in her lifetime as a "jazz musician's jazz singer". A highly underrated singer who rarely received the recognition she richly deserved, perhaps the salient mark of her obscurity was the number of times even followers of the female jazz vocal scene would confuse her with a more popular singer, Etta James. Etta Jones is noted for her elegant interpretations of standards, ballads, and blues. Her characteristic inflections have sometimes prompted comparisons to stylistic devices employed by Billie Holiday and Dinah Washington. Etta's accompanied by Frank Wess, (flute, tenor saxophone), Richard Wyands, (piano), Skeeter Best (guitar), George Duvivier (bass) and Roy Haynes (drums). Recorded June 21, 1960. (Prestige Records) Build your dreams to the stars above But when you need someone true to love Don't go to strangers, darling, come on to me Play with fire 'til your fingers burn And when there's no place for you to turn Don't go to strangers, darling, come on to me For, when you hear a call to follow your heart You follow your heart, I know I've been through it all and I'm an old hand And I'll understand if you go So make your mark for your friends to see But when you need more than company Don't go to strangers, come on to me Oh, make your mark for your friends to see But when you need more than company Don't go to strangers, darling, come on to me
Views: 297862 RoundMidnightTV
Sarah Vaughan - Black Coffee (Columbia Records 1949)
 
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"Black Coffee" is a song written in 1948 by Sonny Burke and the lyrics by Paul Francis Webster. Sarah Vaughan charted with this song in 1949 on Columbia. Sarah's accompanied by Joe Lippman (Conductor/Arranger); Joe Lippman; Jimmy Maxwell (trumpet); Henry W. Rowland (piano); Bob Haggart (bass), Norris "Bunny" Shawker (drums) and CBS Studio Orchestra. Recorded New York City, January 10, 1949. (Columbia Records) I'm feelin' mighty lonesome, haven't slept a wink I walk the floor and watch the door and in between I drink Black coffee love the hand-me-down brew I'll never know a Sunday in this weekday room I'm talkin to the shadows one o'clock till four And Lord, how slow the moments go when all I do is pour Black coffee since the blues caught my eye I'm hangin' out on Monday my Sunday dreams to dry Now man is born to go on lovin' And a woman's born to weep and fret And stay at home to tend her oven And down her past regrets in coffee and cigarettes I'm moanin' all the mornin', moanin' all the night And in between it's nicotine and not much heart to fight Coffee feelin' low as the ground It's drivin' me crazy, this waitin' for my baby To maybe come around
Views: 451855 RoundMidnightTV
Dionne Warwick - You'll Never Get To Heaven If You Break My Heart (Scepter Records 1964)
 
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" You'll Never Get To Heaven If You Break My Heart" is a song written and composed by Hal David and Burt Bacharach. Make Way for Dionne Warwick is the third album by American singer singer Dionne Warwick, released in 1964 on the Scepter label. It was produced by Burt Bacharach and Hal David. The album is notable for including the singles "Walk On By", Warick's second top ten hit on the Billboard Hot 100. Also featured are "You'll Never Get to Heaven", "A House Is Not a Home", "Reach Out for Me", and one of the first recordings of "They Long to Be Close to You". The album was digitally remastered and reissued on CD on November 29, 2011, by Collectables Records. La, la, la, la, la, la, laaaaa La, la, la, laaaaa La, la, la, laaaaa La, la, la, la, la, la, laaaaa La. la, la, laaaaa La, la, la, laaaaa Mother told me always to follow the golden rule And she said it's really a sin to be mean and cruel So remember if you're untrue Angels up in heaven are looking at you You'll never get to heaven if you break my heart so be very careful not to make us part You won't get to heaven if you break my heart Oh no! I've been hearin' rumors about how you play around Though I don't believe what I hear, still it gets me down If you ever should say goodbye It would be so awful the angels would cry You'll never get to heaven if you break my heart so be very careful not to make us part You won't get to heaven if you break my heart Oh no! (If you break my heart, break my heart) I can hardly wait for the day when we say I do It's a day I dreamed of so long now it's comin' true You will promise to cherish me If you break your promise the angels will see You'll never get to heaven if you break my heart So be very careful not to make us part You won't get to heaven if you break my heart Oh no! La, la, la, la, la, la, laaaaa La, la, la, laaaaa La, la, la, laaaaa La, la, la, la, la, la, laaaaa La. la, la, laaaaa La, la, la, laaaaa La, la, la, la, la, la, laaaaa La, la, la, laaaaa...
Views: 258378 RoundMidnightTV
Sarah Vaughan & Count Basie Orchestra - Darn That Dream (Mercury Records 1958)
 
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"Darn That Dream" is a popular song with music by Jimmy Van Heusen and lyrics by Eddie DeLange, published in 1939. The song was introduced in the Broadway musical Swingin' The Dream. Sarah's accompanied by Count Basie Orchestra with included members from the Album No Count Sarah, Thad Jones (leader/trumpet), Ronnell Brighton (piano), Wendell Culley (trumpet), Snooky Young, Joe Newman, Henry Coker (trombone), Al Grey, Benny Powell, Marshall Royal (alto/clarinet), Frank Wess (alto/tenor/flute), Frank Foster, Billy Mitchell (tenor), Charlie Fowlkes (baritone), Richard Davis (bass), Sonny Payne (drums) & Freddie Green (guitar). Recorded January 5, 1958. (Mercury Records) Darn that dream I dream each night You say you love me and you hold me tight But when I awake you're out of sight Oh, darn that dream Darn your lips and darn your eyes They lift me high above the moonlit skies Then I tumble out of paradise Oh, darn that dream Darn that one-track mind of mine It can't understand that you don't care Just to change the mood I'm in I'd welcome a nice old nightmare Darn that dream and bless it too Without that dream I never would have you But it haunts me and it won't come true Darn that dream Darn that one-track mind of mine It can't understand that you don't care Just to change the mood I'm in I'd welcome a nice old nightmare Darn that dream and bless it too Without that dream I never would have you But it haunts me and it won't come true Oh, darn, darn that dream Darn that dream
Views: 115173 RoundMidnightTV
Sarah Vaughan - Tenderly (Live from Sweden) Mercury Records 1958
 
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"Tenderly" is a popular song published in 1946 with music by Walter Gross (1909-1967) and lyrics by Jack Lawrence. Copyright 1946 by Edwin H. Morris & Company, Inc. Originally written in the key of Eb as a waltz in 3/4 time, it has since been performed in 4/4 and has subsequently become a popular jazz standard. Sarah's accompanied by Ronnell Bright (piano), Richard Davis (bass), and Art Morgan (drums). Recorded July 9, 1958. (Mercury Records) The evening breeze Caressed the trees,Tenderly The trembling trees Embraced the breezeTenderly Then you and I Came wandering by And lost in a sigh Were we The shore was kissed By sea and mist Tenderly I can't forget How two hearts met Breathlessly Your arms opened wide And closed me inside You took my lips You took my love So tenderly Then you and I Came wandering by And lost in a sigh Were we The shore was kissed By sea and mist Tenderly I can't forget How two hearts met Breathlessly Your arms opened wide And closed me inside You took my lips You took my love So tenderly
Views: 115264 RoundMidnightTV
Ella Fitzgerald - Mood Indigo (Verve Records 1957)
 
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From Ella Fitzgerald Sings the Duke Ellington Song Book, "Mood Indigo" (1930) & (1955) is a jazz composition and song, with music by Duke Ellington and Barney Bigard with lyrics by Irving Mills. The tune was composed for a radio broadcast in October 1930 and was originally titled "Dreamy Blues." It was "the first tune I ever wrote specially for microphone transmission," Ellington recalled. "The next day wads of mail came in raving about the new tune, so Irving Mills put a lyric to it." Renamed "Mood Indigo," it became a jazz standard. While Irving Mills—Jack Mills's brother and publishing partner—took credit for the lyrics, in a 1987 interview, lyricist Mitchell Parish claimed that he had written the lyrics. What makes the original recording(s) so interesting is the fact that Ellington has taken the traditional front-line of trumpet, trombone and clarinet, and turned them "upside down." At the time of these first three recordings in 1930, the usual voicing of the horns would be clarinet at the top (highest pitch), trumpet in the middle, and the trombone at the bottom (lowest pitch). In "Mood Indigo," Ellington voices the trombone right at the top of the instrument's register, and the clarinet at the very lowest. This was unheard of at the time, and also created (in the studio) a so-called "mike-tone"—an effect generated by the overtones of the clarinet and trombone (which was tightly muted as well). The "mike-tone" gives the audio-illusion of the presence of a fourth "voice," or instrument. "Mood Indigo" is performed both as an instrumental and as a vocal. Ella's accompanied by Ben Webster (ts), Oscar Peterson (p), Herb Ellis (g), Ray Brown (b), Alvin Stoller (d). Recorded October 17, 1957, Los Angeles. (Verve Records) You ain't been blue; no, no, no. You ain't been blue, Till you've had that mood indigo. That feelin' goes stealin' down to my shoes While I sit and sigh, "Go 'long blues". Always get that mood indigo, Since my baby said goodbye. In the evenin' when lights are low, I'm so lonesome I could cry. 'Cause there's nobody who cares about me, I'm just a soul who's bluer than blue can be. When I get that mood indigo, I could lay me down and die. You ain't been blue; no, no, no, no-oh, no. You ain't been blue, Till you've had that mood indigo. That feelin' goes stealin' down to my shoes While I sit and sigh, "Go 'long blues".
Views: 123927 RoundMidnightTV
Nancy Wilson - Happy Talk (Capitol Records 1961)
 
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"Happy Talk" is a show tune from the 1949 Rodgers and Hammerstein musical South Pacific. Nancy's accompanied by Sam Jones (bass), Nat Adderley (cornet), Louis Hayes (drums), Joe Zawinul (piano), and Cannonball Adderley (saxophone [alto]). Recorded in New York City, June 27 & 29, 1961 (Capitol Records) Nancy Sue Wilson (February 20, 1937 – December 13, 2018) was an American singer whose career spanned over five decades, from the mid–1950s until her retirement in the early–2010s. She was notable for her single "(You Don't Know) How Glad I Am" and her version of the standard "Guess Who I Saw Today". On December 13, 2018, Wilson died at her home in Pioneertown, California after a long illness. She was 81 years old. Happy talk, keep talking happy talk Talk about things you'd like to do You gotta have a dream, if you don't have a dream How you gonna have a dream come true Talk about a moon floating in de sky looking like a lily on a lake Talk about a bird learning how to fly Making all the music he can make Happy talk, keep talking' happy talk Talk about things you'd like to do You gotta have a dream, if you don't have a dream How you gonna have a dream come true Talk about a star looking like a toy Peeking through de branches of a tree Talk about a girl, talk about a boy Counting all de ripples on de sea Happy talk, keep talking happy talk Talk about things you'd like to do You gotta have a dream, if you don't have a dream How you gonna have a dream come true
Views: 58848 RoundMidnightTV
Sarah Vaughan - Honeysuckle Rose (Live from Sweden) Mercury Records 1964
 
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"Honeysuckle Rose" is a 1929 song composed by Fats Waller and lyrics were written by Andy Razaf. Waller's 1934 recording was inducted in the Grammy Hall of Fame in 1999. Sarah's accompanied by Kirk Stuart (piano), Charles "Buster" Williams (bass), and Georges Hughes (drums). Recorded in Sweden, 1964. (Mercury Records) Every honeybee fills with jealousy When they see you out with me I don't blame them goodness knows My honeysuckle rose When you're passin' by flowers droop and sigh And I know the reason why You're much sweeter goodness knows My honeysuckle rose I don't buy sugar You'll just have to touch my cup Oh yea you're my sugar It's sweet when you stir it up When I'm taking sips from your tasty lips Seems the honey fairly drips You're confection goodness knows My honeysuckle rose Every honeybee fills with jealousy When they see you out with me I don't blame them goodness knows My honeysuckle rose When you're passin' by flowers droop and sigh And I know the reason why You're much sweeter goodness knows My honeysuckle rose I don't buy sugar You'll just have to touch my cup Oh yea you're my sugar It's sweet when you stir it up When I'm taking sips from your tasty lips Seems the honey fairly drips You're confection goodness knows You're my honeysuckle rose You're my sweeter gooness knows 'Cause you're my ever loving honeysuckle rose
Views: 68848 RoundMidnightTV
Sarah Vaughan - Speak Low (Live @ The London House) Mercury Records 1958
 
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"Speak Low" is a popular 1943 song composed by Kurt Weill, with lyrics by Ogden Nash. It was introduced by Mary Martin and Kenny Baker in the Broadway musical One Touch of Venus (1943). The 1944 hit single was by Guy Lombardo and his orchestra, with vocal by Billy Leach. The tune is a jazz standard that has been widely recorded. The opening line is a (slight mis) quotation from William Shakespeare's Much Ado About Nothing, Act II Scene 1 (1600), where it is spoken by Don Pedro. Sarah Lois Vaughan (March 27, 1924 – April 3, 1990) was an American jazz singer, described by music critic Scott Yanow as having "one of the most wondrous voices of the 20th century." Nicknamed "Sassy" and "The Divine One", Sarah Vaughan was a Grammy Award winner. The National Endowment for the Arts bestowed upon her its "highest honor in jazz", the NEA Jazz Masters Award, in 1989. Sarah's accompanied on the live album "After Hours" by Ronell Bright (piano), Richard Davis (double bass), Roy Haynes (drums), Thad Jones & Wendell Culley (trumpet), Henry Coker (trombone), and Frank Wess (tenor saxophone). Recorded live at the London House in Chicago, Illinois, March 7, 1958. (Mercury Records) Speak low when you speak love Our summer day withers away too soon, too soon Speak low when you speak love Our moment is swift, like ships adrift, We're swept apart, too soon Speak low, darling, speak low Love is a spark, lost in the dark too soon, too soon I feel wherever I go That tomorrow is near, Tomorrow is here and always too soon Time is so old and love so brief Love is pure gold and time a thief We're late, darling, we're late The curtain descends, everything ends too soon, too soon I wait, darling, I wait Will you speak low to me, speak love to me and soon Time is so old and love so brief Love is pure gold and time a thief Time a thief We're late, darling, we're late The curtain descends, everything ends too soon, too soon I wait, darling, I wait Will you speak low to me, speak love to me and soon Will you speak low to me, speak love to me too soon Will you speak low to me, speak love to me and soon And soon
Views: 379532 RoundMidnightTV
Sarah Vaughan with Clifford Brown - Jim (EmArcy Records 1954)
 
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"Jim" is a popular song with music by Caesar Petrillo and Edward Ross, lyrics by Nelson Shawn. The song was published in 1941. Sarah's accompanied by Leader/Arranger: Ernie Wilkins, Clifford Brown (trumpet), Herbie Mann (flute), Paul Quinichette (tenor), Jimmy Jones (piano), Joe Benjamin (bass), and Roy Haynes (drums). Recorded in New York, December 18, 1954. (EmArcy Records affiliate of Mercury) Jim doesn't ever bring me pretty flowers Jim never tries to cheer my lonely hours Don't know why I'm so crazy for Jim Jim never tells me I'm his heart's desire I never seem to set his love afire Gone are the years I've wasted on him Sometimes when I get feelin' low I say let's call it quits Then I hang on and let him go Breakin' my heart in bits Someday I know that Jim will up and leave me But even if he does you can believe me I'll go on carrying the torch for Jim I'll go on lovin' my Jim
Views: 41346 RoundMidnightTV
Nancy Wilson - Midnight Sun (Capitol Records 1967)
 
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"Midnight Sun" (1954) was originally an instrumental composed by Lionel Hampton and Sonny Burke in 1947 and is now considered a jazz standard. Subsequently, Johnny Mercer wrote the words to the song. It is said that Johnny Mercer was driving along the freeway from Palm Springs to Hollywood, California, when he heard the instrumental on his car radio and started to set words to the song as he drove. This version can be found on the album "Lush Life." Nancy's accompanied by Bob Knight (tb); Vince DeRosa, Bill Hinshaw, Jimmy McGee (fr-hrn); Harry Klee, Abe Most, Justin Gordon (f, alto-f, b-f); Bob Hardaway (f, alto-fl, b-cl, eng-hrn); Donn Trenner (p); John Collins (g); Catherine Gotthoffer (harp); Erno Neufeld, Carl LaMagna, Emil Briano, Gerald Vinci, Victor Arno, Jacques Gasselin, Betty Marks, Alfred Lustgarten, Nathan Kaproff, John DeVoodgt, Mischa Russell, Ed Bergman (vln); Raphael Kramer, Justin DiTullio, Fred Seykora, Armand Kaproff (cello); Buster Williams (b); Shelly Manne (d); Victor Feldman (perc, mallots); Oliver Nelson (arr, cond). Recorded in Hollywood California, May 15, 1967. (Capitol Records) Nancy Sue Wilson (February 20, 1937 – December 13, 2018) was an American singer whose career spanned over five decades, from the mid–1950s until her retirement in the early–2010s. She was notable for her single "(You Don't Know) How Glad I Am" and her version of the standard "Guess Who I Saw Today". On December 13, 2018, Wilson died at her home in Pioneertown, California after a long illness. She was 81 years old. Your lips were like a red and ruby chalice Warmer than a summer night The clouds were like an alabaster palace Rising to a snowy height Each star its own aurora borealis Suddenly you held me tight I could see the midnight sun I can't explain the silver rain that found me Or was that a moonlit veil? The music of the universe around me Or was that a nightingale? And then your arms miraculously found me Suddenly the sky turned pale I could see the midnight sun Was there such a night It's a thrill I still don't quite believe But after you were gone There was still some stardust on my sleeve The flame of it may dwindle to an ember And the stars forget to shine And we may see the meadow in December Icy white and crystalline But oh, my darling always I'll remember When your lips were close to mine And I saw the midnight sun
Views: 150832 RoundMidnightTV
Ella Fitzgerald - Cry Me A River (Verve Records 1961)
 
04:20
"Cry Me a River" is a popular American torch song, written by Arthur Hamilton and first published in 1953, and made famous in the version by Julie London, 1955. A jazzy blues ballad, "Cry Me a River" was originally written for Ella Fitzgerald to sing in the 1920s-set film, Pete Kelly's Blues (released 1955) but the song was dropped. It has been said that it was dropped because, at the time of Ella's recording, film and record producers said that the audience would not believe that a "colored/black" person would know what the word Plebeian meant nor would they use it. They were afraid that Ella's vocals combined with the use of such an "intelligent" word would upset their target audience. Fitzgerald first released a recording of the song on Clap Hands, Here Comes Charlie! in 1961. The song's first release and most famous recording was by actress/singer Julie London in 1955, backed by Barney Kessel on guitar and Ray Leatherwood on bass. A sultry performance of the song by London in the 1956 film The Girl Can't Help It helped to make it a million-selling blockbuster (#9 US/#22 UK). London's recording was later featured in the soundtrack's for the movies 'Passion of Mind (2000), and V for Vendetta (2005). Barbra Streisand sang this song on her 1963 debut album as the opening track of Side 1. In 1970, British blues rocker Joe Cocker made the chart with an upbeat rock rendition on the album, Mad Dogs and Englishmen. In 1995, British actress Denise Welch's double A-side "You Don't Have to Say You Love Me" / "Cry Me a River" spent three weeks in the UK Singles Chart, reaching #23. Canadian jazz pianist and singer Diana Krall recorded the song on her 2001 album, The Look of Love. In 2009, Canadian singer Michael Bublé entered the charts with a big-band jazz version, which is also the opening track of his fourth album Crazy Love. This adaption of the song was used in the BBC's advertising and theme music for coverage of the 2010 Winter Olympics in Vancouver. Ella Jane Fitzgerald (April 25, 1917 – June 15, 1996) was an American jazz vocalist with a vocal range spanning three octaves (D♭3 to D♭6). Often referred to as the "First Lady of Song," the "Queen of Jazz" and "Lady Ella," she was noted for her purity of tone, impeccable diction, phrasing and intonation, and a "horn-like" improvisational ability, particularly in her scat singing. Fitzgerald was a notable interpreter of the Great American Songbook. Over the course of her 60-year recording career, she sold 40 million copies of her 70-plus albums, won 13 Grammy Awards and was awarded the National Medal of Arts by Ronald Reagan and the Presidential Medal of Freedom by George H. W. Bush. Ella's accompanied by Lou Levy (piano); Herb Ellis (guitar); Joe Mondragon (bass); and Gus Johnson (drums). Recorded June 23, 1961, Los Angeles (Verve Records) Now you say you're lonely You cried the long night through Well, you can cry me a river Cry me a river I cried a river over you Now you say you're sorry For being so untrue Well, you can cry me a river Cry me a river I cried a river over you You drove me, Nearly drove me out of my head While you never shed a tear Remember? I remember all that you said Told me love was to plebeian Told me you were through with me Now you say you love me Well, just to prove you do Cry me a river Cry me a river I cried a river over you You drove me Nearly drove me out of my head While you never shed a tear Remember? I remember all that you said Told me love was to plebeian Told me you were through with me... And now you say you love me Well, just to prove that you do... Come on! Come on! Cry me a river... Cry me a river... I cried a river over you I cried a river over you...
Views: 1090934 RoundMidnightTV
Sarah Vaughan - Key Largo (Roulette Records 1962)
 
03:36
"Key Largo" is a 1948 song by Benny Carter, Karl Suessdorf & Leah Worth. It was also written for the Humphrey Bogart and Lauren Bacall film of the same name, this smooth, gentle number was introduced by Carter's own band. It would later become a popular tune with the progressive jazz performers who would emerge in the 1950s. Sarah's accompanied by Joe Comfort (bass) and Barney Kessel (guitar). Recorded on August 7, 1962 at United Recorders, Los Angeles. (Roulette Records) Key Largo, Alone on Key Largo, How empty it seems, With only my dreams Strange cargo, They come to Key Largo, But where is the face, My heart won't erase The moon tide, Rolling in from the sea, Is lonely, And it always will be 'til you're with me And I know, I'll stay in Key Largo, Just watching the shore to find you once more Key Largo, Alone on Key Largo, How empty it seems, With only my dreams Strange cargo, May come to Key Largo, But where is the face, My heart won't erase The moon tide, Rolling in from the sea, Is lonely, And it always will be 'til you're with me And I know, I'll stay in Key Largo, Just watching the shore to find you once more In Key Largo, find you once more in Key Largo.
Views: 41992 RoundMidnightTV
Sarah Vaughan ft The Bob James Trio - The Shadow Of Your Smile (Live from Sweden) 1967
 
05:28
"The Shadow of Your Smile", also known as "Love Theme from The Sandpiper", is a popular song. The music was written by Johnny Mandel with the lyrics written by Paul Francis Webster. The song was introduced in the 1965 film The Sandpiper, with a trumpet solo by Jack Sheldon and later became a minor hit for Tony Bennett (Johnny Mandel arranged and conducted his version as well). It won the Grammy Award for Song of the Year and the Academy Award for Best Original Song. Sarah's accompanied by Bob James (piano), Herbie Mickman (bass), Omar Clay (drums) Recorded live in Sweden, 1967. The shadow of your smile When you are gone Will color all my dreams And light the dawn Look into my eyes, my eyes, look and see All the lovely things, you are, to me A wistful little star Was far, too high A teardrop kissed your lips And so did I love When I remember spring All the joy that love can bring I'll will be remembering The shadow of your smile A wistful little star Was far, too high A teardrop kissed your lips And so did I Now when I remember spring All the joy that love can bring I'll will be remembering The shadow of your smile Now when I remember spring All the joy that love can bring I'll be remembering The shadow of your smile The shadow of your smile The shadow of your smile
Views: 314226 RoundMidnightTV
Sarah Vaughan - They All Laughed (Live from Holland 1958)
 
02:51
"They All Laughed" is a song composed by George Gershwin, with lyrics by Ira Gershwin, written for the 1937 film Shall We Dance where it was introduced by Ginger Rogers as part of a song and dance routine with Fred Astaire. The lyrics compare those who "laughed at me, wanting you" with those who laughed at some of history's famous scientific and industrial pioneers, asking, "Who's got the last laugh now?" People and advances mentioned are Christopher Columbus's alleged proof the earth is round; Thomas Edison's phonograph; Guglielmo Marconi's wireless telegraphy; the Wright brothers's first flight; the Rockefeller Center; Eli Whitney's cotton gin; Robert Fulton's North River Steamboat; Milton S. Hershey's Hershey bar chocolate; and Henry Ford's "Tin Lizzy" Model T car. Sarah's accompanied by Richard Davis (Bass); Ronnell Bright (Piano); and Art Morgan (Drums). The odds were a hundred-to-one against me The world thought the heights were too high to climb But people from Missouri never incensed me Oh, I wasn't a bit concerned For from history I had learned How many, many times the worm had turned They all laughed at Christopher Columbus When he said the world was round They all laughed when Edison recorded sound They all laughed at Wilbur and his brother When they said that man could fly They told Marconi Wireless was a phony It's the same old cry They laughed at me wanting you Said I was reaching for the moon But, oh, you came through Now they'll have to change their tune They all said we never could be happy They laughed at us and how But ho, ho, ho Who's got the last laugh now? They all laughed at Rockefeller Center Now they're fighting to get in They all laughed at Whitney and his cotton gin They all laughed at Fulton and his steamboat Hershey and his chocolate bar Ford and his Lizzie Kept the laughers busy That's how people are They laughed at me wanting you Said it would be, "hello, goodbye" But, oh, you came through Now they're eating humble pie They all said we'd never get together Darling, let's take a bow For ho, ho, ho Who's got the last laugh? Hee, hee, hee Let's at the past laugh Ha, ha, ha Who's got the last laugh now?
Views: 69119 RoundMidnightTV
Dionne Warwick - Reach Out For Me (Scepter Records 1964)
 
02:55
"Reach Out for Me" is a 1964 single by Dionne Warwick, a song originally recorded by Lou Johnson. Her single, written by Burt Bacharach and Hal David, is a track from the album Make Way for Dionne Warwick. It was a number twenty hit on the Billboard Hot 100 and went to number one on the Cash Box R&B chart. The song was also covered by British singer Michael Ball on his album Back To Bacharach as well as Olivia Newton-John on her 1989 album "Warm and Tender". The song reached October 24th it entered Billboard's Hot Top 100 chart on October 24th eventually peaking at #20 and spending 8 weeks on the Top 100. It reached #1 on Cash Box's Top R&B singles chart {Billboard didn't have an R&B chart in 1964}...And in Canada is peaked at #12 and in the UK it reached #23. When you go through a day And the things that people say They make you feel so small They make you feel that Your heart will just never stop aching And when you just can't accept The abuse you are taking Darlin' reach out for me Don't you worry I'll see you through You just have to reach out for me I'll be there and I'll confort you Oh yes I will Comfort you and love you How I'm gonna love you When good friends prove untrue And the things they do to you They make you feel so bad They make you feel that You haven't a reason for living So when you feel you Could throw in the towel and just given in Darlin' reach out for me
Views: 111361 RoundMidnightTV
Sarah Vaughan - In A Sentimental Mood (Roulette Records 1961)
 
04:10
"In a Sentimental Mood" is a jazz composition by Duke Ellington which is also performed as a song. Ellington composed the piece in 1931 and recorded it with his orchestra the same year. Lyrics were later written for the tune by Irving Mills and Manny Kurtz. According to Ellington, the song was born in Durham, North Carolina. "We had played a big dance in a tobacco warehouse, and afterwards a friend of mine, an executive in the North Carolina Mutual Insurance Company, threw a party for Amy. I was playing piano when another one of our friends had some trouble with two chicks. To pacify them, I composed this there and then, with one chick standing on each side of the piano." The original recording featured solos by Otto Hardwicke, Harry Carney, Lawrence Brown, and Rex Stewart. "In a Sentimental Mood" makes use of a musical technique called contrapuntal or chromatic embellishment of static harmony. This is also sometimes referred to as a line cliché. Ellington recorded his best-known version together with John Coltrane, which is featured on Duke Ellington and John Coltrane and Coltrane for Lovers. The Ellington and Coltrane version was performed in the key of D flat major, mainly from B flat minor 7th to E flat minor 7th, and then A flat 13th to D flat major 7th, with an interesting interlude in A major. After Hours is a 1961 studio album by American jazz singer Sarah Vaughan. This was Vaughan's first album with just guitar and double bass accompaniment, it was followed by 1963's Sarah + 2 in a similar vein. The Allmusic review by Scott Yanow awarded After Hours three stars and said that "the emphasis throughout is exclusively on Sassy's magnificent voice. The program mostly sticks to ballads, with a couple of exceptions...and is a quiet and intimate affair, with Vaughan more subtle than she sometimes was. Despite a lightweight version of "My Favorite Things" that will not remind listeners of John Coltrane, this is an excellent if brief set (34-and-a-half minutes) with some fine jazz singing". Sarah's accompanied by Mundell Lowe (guitar) and George Duvivier (double bass). Pictured along with Sarah in video is Richard Davis. Recorded in RKO-Path Studio, New York City, July 18, 1961. (Roulette Records) In a sentimental mood I can see the stars come through my room While your lovin' attitude Is like a flame that lights the gloom On the wings of every kiss Every kiss, every kiss Drifts a melody so strange and sweet In the sentimental bliss you make my paradise My paradise complete Rose petals seem to fall It's all like a dream to call you mine To call you mine My heart's a lighter thing Since you made this night a thing divine In a sentimental mood I'm within a world, so heavenly For I never dreamt that you'd, you'd be lovin' sentimental You'd be loving sentimental me Rose petals seem to fall It's all like a dream to call you mine My heart's a lighter thing Since you made this night a thing divine, divine In a sentimental mood I'm within a world, so heavenly For I never dreamt that you'd be lovin' sentimental Sentimental, sentimentally
Views: 199039 RoundMidnightTV
Peter Nero - Theme from "Summer of '42" (Columbia Records 1971)
 
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Michel Legrand's theme song for the film, "The Summer Knows," has since become a pop standard, being recorded by such artists as Peter Nero (who had a charting hit with his 1971 version), Tony Bennett, Frank Sinatra, Andy Williams, Jonny Fair, and Barbra Streisand. The 1973 song "Summer (The First Time)" by Bobby Goldsboro has almost exactly the same subject and apparent setting, although there is no direct credited link. Bryan Adams has, however, credited the film as being a partial inspiration for his 1985 hit "Summer of '69." Peter Nero (born Bernard Nierow) is an American pianist and pops conductor. Born in Brooklyn, New York, as Bernard Nierow, he started his formal music training at the age of seven. He studied piano under Frederick Bried. By the time he was fourteen, he was accepted to New York City's High School of Music & Art and won a scholarship to the Juilliard School of Music. Constance Keene, his teacher and mentor, once wrote in an issue of Keyboard Classics, "Vladimir Horowitz was Peter's greatest fan!" He graduated from Brooklyn College in 1956. Nero recorded his first album under the name of Bernie Nerow in July 1957 under the Mode label MOD-LP117 which shows his technical virtuosity in the jazz genre. Nero recorded an album in 1961, and won a Grammy Award that year for "Best New Artist." Since then, he has received another Grammy, garnered ten additional nominations and released 67 albums. Nero's early association with RCA Victor produced 23 albums in eight years. His subsequent move to Columbia Records resulted in a million-selling single and album – Summer of '42. His first major national TV success came at the age of seventeen when he was chosen to perform Gershwin's Rhapsody in Blue on Paul Whiteman's TV Special. He subsequently appeared on many top variety and talk shows including 11 guest appearances on The Ed Sullivan Show, and numerous appearances on The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson. Hailed as one of the premier interpreters of Gershwin, Nero starred in the Emmy Award-winning NBC Special, S'Wonderful, S'Marvelous, S'Gershwin (1972). Other TV credits include performances on PBS-TV Piano Pizzazz and with the National Symphony in Washington, D.C. on its July 4 special titled A Capitol Fourth. Nero served as music director and pianist for the PBS-TV special The Songs of Johnny Mercer: Too Marvelous for Words (1997) with co-stars Johnny Mathis, Melissa Manchester and many members of The POPS. In 1963 Nero composed and performed the musical score for the major motion picture Sunday in New York. The title song has been recorded by over two dozen vocalists and the score was nominated for both a Golden Globe and Hollywood Reporter Award.[citation needed] He also made an appearance in the film alongside Jane Fonda, Rod Taylor, and Cliff Robertson. In the film, Jane Fonda's character gave her brother (Robertson) a Nero recording, in what was probably a form of product placement. Nero has worked with a long list of notable musicians including Frank Sinatra, Mel Torme, Andy Williams, Ray Charles, Dizzy Gillespie, Diane Schuur, Johnny Mathis, Roger Kellaway and Elton John. Nero was the founding music director of the world-renowned Peter Nero and the Philly Pops, which he led from 1979 to 2013. Nero's recordings include albums with symphony orchestras: On My Own, Classical Connections and My Way. He recorded Peter Nero and Friends where he collaborated with Mel Torme, Maureen McGovern and Doc Severinsen and others. Nero's latest albums, Love Songs for a Rainy Day and More in Love, focus on romantic themes. By popular demand, four of his earlier recordings have been reissued. He most recently appeared on Rod Stewart's album As Time Goes By: The Great American Songbook, Volume II. The summer smiles the summer knows And unashamed, she sheds her clothes The summer smooths the restless sky And lovingly she warms the sand on which you lie The summer knows the summer's wise She sees the doubts within your eyes And so she takes here summer time Tell the moon to wait and the sun to linger Twists the world round her summer finger Let you see the wonder of it all And if you've learned your lesson well There's little more for her to tell One last cares it's time to dress for fall
Views: 128066 RoundMidnightTV
Billie Holiday - These Foolish Things (Remind Me Of You) Mercury Records 1952
 
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"These Foolish Things (Remind Me Of You)" is a standard with words by Eric Maschwitz and music by Jack Strachey. The name of an American, Harry Link, sometimes appears as a co-writer, but his input was probably limited to changes to suit the US market. It is one of a group of 'Mayfair Songs', like "A Nightingale Sang in Berkeley Square". Maschwitz wrote the song under his pen name, Holt Marvell. The copyright was lodged in 1936 and it was written for Joan Carr for a late-evening review broadcast by the BBC. Maschwitz was romantically linked to the Chinese-American actress Anna May Wong while working in Hollywood, and the lyrics of "These Foolish Things" are evocative of his longing for her after they parted and he returned to England. Billie's accompanied by Oscar Peterson (p), Barney Kessel (g), Ray Brown (b), and Alvin Stoller (d). Recorded in Los Angeles, March 26,1952. (Mercury Records) A cigarette that bears a lipstick's traces An airline ticket to romantic places And still my heart has wings These foolish things remind me of you A tinkling piano in the next apartment Those stumbling words that told you what my heart meant A fair ground's painted swings These foolish things remind me of you You came you saw you conquer'd me When you did that to me I knew somehow this had to be The winds of March that make my heart a dancer A telephone that rings but who's to answer? Oh, how the ghost of you clings! These foolish things remind me of you First daffodils and long excited cables And candle lights on little corner tables And still my heart has wings These foolish things remind me of you The park at evening when the bell has sounded The "Ile de France" with all the gulls around it The beauty that is Spring's These foolish things remind me of you How strange how sweet to find you still These things are dear to me They seem to bring you near to me The sigh of midnight trains in empty stations Silk stockings thrown aside dance invitations Oh, how the ghost of you clings! These foolish things remind me of you Gardenia perfume ling'ring on a pillow Wild strawb'ries only seven francs a kilo And still my heart has wings These foolish things remind me of you The smile of Garbo and the scent of roses The waiters whistling as the last bar closes The song that Crosby sings These foolish things remind me of you How strange how sweet to find you still These things are dear to me They seem to bring you near to me The scent of smould'ring leaves, the wail of steamers Two lovers on the street who walk like dreamers Oh, how the ghost of you clings! These foolish things remind me of you
Views: 71268 RoundMidnightTV
Ahmad Jamal - Poinciana (Song of the Trees) Argo Records 1958
 
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"Poinciana" is a song to music by Nat Simon and lyrics by Buddy Bernier written in 1936. The tune is based on a Cuban folk tune La canción del árbol ("The song of the tree"). The poinciana tree itself, delonix regia, is a tree introduced to Cuba from Madagascar. Glenn Miller performed it in the late 1930s. Benny Carter and Bing Crosby both issued versions in 1944. It was widely popularized in the 1952 film Dreamboat and subsequently became a standard covered by artists including Johnny Mathis, Vic Damone, Percy Faith, The Four Freshmen and of course Ahmad Jamal (as the first track on an eponymous album), and which featured again in the 1995 film The Bridges of Madison County. In 1978 disco duo Paradise Express recorded a version which made the top 20 on the disco charts. "Poinciana" became "standard dance music" at parties, and, abridged, appeared on jukeboxes, because "Jamal lets the bass and drums establish a Latin groove that's very appealing. He floats lightly on top of it in a spare, tightly constructed series of embellishments that's full of what the popular music people call 'hooks.' There's a lot of repetition but no redundancy, if you know what I mean." Ahmad Jamal (born Fritz Russell Jones, July 2, 1930) is an American jazz pianist, composer, and educator. According to American music critic Stanley Crouch, Jamal is second in importance in the development of jazz after 1945 only to Charlie Parker. For five decades, he has been one of the most successful small-group leaders in jazz. At the Pershing: But Not for Me is a 1958 jazz album by pianist Ahmad Jamal. The recordings took place on January 16, 1958, at the Pershing Lounge of Chicago's Pershing Hotel and each set played that night was recorded, a total of 43 tracks, of which 8 were selected by Jamal for the album. The LP was released as Argo Records LP-628. Jamal's previous releases on Argo had been from previously made masters; this was his first release recorded for Argo, and his first album recorded live. Ahmad's accompanied by Ahmad Jamal on (piano), Israel Crosby (bass) & Vernel Fournier (drums). Blow tropic wind, sing a song through the tree Tree sigh to me, soon my love I will see Poinciana, your branches speak to me of love Pale moon is casting shadows from above Poinciana, somehow I feel the jungle beat Within me, there grows a rhythmic, savage beast Love is everywhere, it's magic perfume fills the air To and fro you sway, my heart's in time, I've learned to care Poinciana, those skies may turn from blue to gray My love will live forever and a day Blow tropic wind, sing a song through the tree Tree sigh to me, soon my love I will see Poinciana
Views: 297128 RoundMidnightTV
Ella Fitzgerald ft Buddy Bregman & His Orchestra - Begin The Beguine (Verve Records 1956)
 
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"Begin the Beguine" is a song written by Cole Porter. Porter composed the song at the piano in the bar of the Ritz Hotel in Paris. In October 1935, it was introduced by June Knight in the Broadway musical Jubilee produced at the Imperial Theatre in New York City. The beguine music and dance form, a slow, close couples' dance, comes from the Caribbean, especially Martinique and Guadeloupe, where in the local Creole language the name means "White lady". It is a combination of French ballroom dance and Latin folk dance, which became popular in Paris and spread further abroad in the 1940s, largely due to the influence of the Porter song. Based on the title dance, the song is notable for its 108-measure length, departing drastically from the conventional thirty-two-bar form. Where a typical "standard" popular song of its time was written in a fairly strict 32-measure form consisting of two or three eight-measure subjects generally arranged in the form A-A-B-A or A-B-A-C, "Begin the Beguine" employs the form A-A-B-A-C1-C2 with each phrase being sixteen measures in length rather than the usual eight. The final "C2" section is stretched beyond its 16 measures an additional twelve bars for a total of 28 measures, with the twelve additional measures providing a sense of finality to the long form. The slight differences in each of the "A" sections, along with the song's long phrases and final elongated "C2" section at the end, give it unique character and complexity. The fact that the song's individual parts hold up melodically and harmonically over such a long form also attests to Porter's talent and ability as a songwriter. Porter reportedly once said of the song, "I can never remember it — if I want to play I need to see the music in front of me!" Alec Wilder described it in his book American Popular Song: The Great Innovators 1900-1950 as "a maverick, an unprecedented experiment and one which, to this day, after hearing it hundreds of times, I cannot sing or whistle or play from start to finish without the printed music". Ella's accompanied by Buddy Bregman & His Orchestra. Recorded February 8, 1956, Capitol Studios, Hollywood. (Verve Records) When they begin the beguine It brings back the sound of music so tender, It brings back a night of tropical splendor, It brings back a memory ever green. I`m with you once more under the stars, And down by the shore an orchestra`s playing And even the palms seem to be swaying When they begin the beguine. To live it again is past all endeavor, Except when that tune clutches my heart, And there we are, swearing to love forever, And promising never, never to part. What moments divine, what rapture serene, 'Til clouds came along to disperse the joys we had tasted, And now when I hear people curse the chance that was wasted, I know but too well what they mean; So don`t let them begin the beguine Let the love that was once a fire remain an ember; Let it sleep like the dead desire I only remember When they begin the beguine. Oh yes, let them begin the beguine, make them play 'Til the stars that were there before return above you, 'Til you whisper to me once more, Darling, I love you! And we suddenly know What heaven we`re in, When they begin the beguine When they begin the beguine
Views: 149951 RoundMidnightTV
Anita O'Day - Sweet Georgia Brown & Tea for Two (Live @ Newport Jazz Festival 1958)
 
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Anita O'Day (October 18, 1919 -- November 23, 2006) was an American jazz singer. Born Anita Belle Colton, O'Day was admired for her sense of rhythm and dynamics, and her early big band appearances shattered the traditional image of the "girl singer". Refusing to pander to any female stereotype, O'Day presented herself as a "hip" jazz musician, wearing a band jacket and skirt as opposed to an evening gown. She changed her surname from Colton to O'Day, pig Latin for "dough," slang for money. She appears in this documentary Jazz on a Summer's Day, filmed at the 1958 Newport Jazz Festival, which increased her popularity. She admitted later that she was probably high on heroin during the concert. She also said that it was the best day of her life in that hers was the star performance of the festival and she made the cover of national magazines for it. Jazz on a Summer's Day (1960) is a documentary film set at the 1958 Newport Jazz Festival in Rhode Island, co-filmed and co-directed by commercial and fashion photographer Bert Stern and director Aram Avakian, who also edited the movie. It was written by Albert D'Annibale and Arnold Perl. The Columbia Records jazz producer, George Avakian, was the musical director of the film. The film mixes images of water and the city with the performers and audience at the festival. It also features scenes of the 1958 America's Cup yacht races. The film is largely without dialog or narration (except for periodic announcements by emcee Willis Conover). The film features performances by Jimmy Giuffre, Thelonious Monk, Sonny Stitt, Anita O'Day, Dinah Washington, Gerry Mulligan, Chuck Berry, Louis Armstrong, and Jack Teagarden. Also appearing are Buck Clayton, Jo Jones, Armando Peraza, and Eli's Chosen Six, the Yale College student ensemble that included trombonist Roswell Rudd, shown driving around Newport in a convertible jalopy, playing Dixieland. Many performances ran so long that the last act, Mahalia Jackson, did not appear on stage until after midnight, performing The Lord's Prayer. In 1999, the film was selected for preservation in the United States National Film Registry by the Library of Congress as being "culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant".
Views: 344354 RoundMidnightTV
Ella Fitzgerald & Louis Armstrong - Tenderly (Verve Records 1956)
 
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"Tenderly" is a popular song published in 1946 with music by Walter Gross (1909-1967) and lyrics by Jack Lawrence. Copyright 1946 by Edwin H. Morris & Company, Inc. Originally written in the key of Eb as a waltz in 3/4 time, it has since been performed in 4/4 and has subsequently become a popular jazz standard. Ella's accompanied by Oscar Peterson (p), Herb Ellis (g), Ray Brown (b), Buddy Rich (d) and Louis Armstrong (trumpet/vocals). Recorded in Hollywood, August 16, 1956. (Verve Records) Ella: The evening breeze caressed the trees tenderly The trembling trees embraced the breeze tenderly Then you and I came wandering by And lost in a sigh were we The shore was kissed by sea and mist tenderly I can't forget how two hearts met breathlessly Your arms opened wide and closed me inside You took my lips, you took my love so tenderly Louis: The evening breeze erased the trees tenderly Trembling trees embraced the breeze tenderly Then you and I came wandering by And lost in a sigh were we Oh the shores were kissed by the mist tenderly Ba-Bop Be-den I can't forget how two hearts met tenderly Ba-ba- Du-dut Your arms opened wide and closed me inside You took took my chops, way from pops tenderly Ba-bu tenderly Tenderly Oooh, oooh Oooh, uuuh Ba-bu Du-zu Ba-du-ba-zet oh yes
Views: 294719 RoundMidnightTV
Billie Holiday - It Had To Be You (Clef Records 1955)
 
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"It Had to Be You" is a popular song written by Isham Jones, with lyrics by Gus Kahn, and was first published in 1924. The song was performed by Priscilla Lane in the 1939 film The Roaring Twenties and by Danny Thomas in the 1951 film I'll See You in My Dreams. The lyrics explain why the singer puts up with a domineering partner. The reason offered is depth of attachment: "somebody who could make me be true, could make me be blue." However, domination itself may be the attraction: "some others I've seen might never be mean, never be cross, try to be boss, but they wouldn't do." The singer concludes: "nobody else gave me a thrill ... wonderful you, it had to be you." However, the lyrics can be interpreted as a realistic and bemused commentary on the reality of attachment, a recognition that the beloved is not perfect but has significant flaws which can be tolerated and accepted because of her (or his) virtues. While "It Had to Be You" is not unique in taking this stand about romantic love, it does counterpose itself to the dominant pattern in the Great American Songbook of celebrating the beloved as a perfect angel. In any case, the complicated melody, minor chords, and ambiguous lyrics make this a classic torch song. Billie's accompanied by Benny Cater (alto sax), Artie Shapiro & John Simmons (bass), Larry Bunker (drums), Barney Kessel (guitar), Jimmy Rowles (piano), and Harry "Sweets" Edison (trumpet). Recorded August 23, 1955, Radio Recorders, Hollywood, California. (Clef Records) It had to be you, it had to be you I wandered around, and finally found, the somebody who Could make me be true, could make me be blue And even be glad, just to be sad, thinking of you Some others I've seen, might never be mean Might never be cross, or try to be boss but they wouldn't do For nobody else, gave me a thrill with all your faults, I love you still It had to be you, wonderful you, it had to be you It had to be you, it had to be you I wandered around, and finally found, the somebody who Could make me be true, could make me be blue And even be glad, just to be sad, thinking of you Some others I've seen, might never be mean Might never be cross, or try to be boss but they wouldn't do For nobody else, gave me a thrill with all your faults, I love you still It had to be you, wonderful you, it had to be you
Views: 1116470 RoundMidnightTV
Sarah Vaughan ft Hal Mooney & His Studio Orchestra - Autumn In New York (Mercury Records 1956)
 
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"Autumn in New York" is a jazz standard composed by Vernon Duke in 1934 for the Broadway musical Thumbs Up! which opened on December 27, 1934, performed by J. Harold Murray. Several versions of the song have been recorded over the years by numerous musicians and singers. Sarah's accompanied by Hal Mooney and His Studio Orchestra. Recorded October 29, 1956, New York. (Mercury Records) Autumn in New York Why does it seem so inviting? Autumn in New York It spells the thrill of first-nighting Glittering crowds and shimmering clouds In canyons of steel They're making me feel I'm home It's autumn in New York That brings the promise of new love Autumn in New York Is often mingled with pain Dreamers with empty hands May sigh for exotic lands It's autumn in New York It's good to live it again Autumn in New York You need no castles in Spain Lovers that bless the dark On benches in Central Park Greet Autumn in New York It's good to live it again In New York
Views: 45664 RoundMidnightTV
Sarah Vaughan - Bewitched, Bothered & Bewildered (Mercury Records 1956)
 
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"Bewitched, Bothered and Bewildered" is a show tune and popular song from the 1940 Rodgers and Hart musical Pal Joey. The song was introduced by Vivienne Segal in the 1940 Broadway production, and also sung by Miss Segal both on the 1950 hit record and in the 1952 Broadway revival. Sarah's accompanied by Hal Mooney and His Studio Orchestra. Recorded in New York, October 29, 1956. (Mercury Records). He's a fool and don't I know it But a fool can have his charms I'm in love and don't I show it Like a babe in arms Love's the same old sad sensation Lately I've not slept a wink Since this half-pint imitation Put me on the blink I'm wild again, beguiled again A simpering, whimpering child again Bewitched, bothered and bewildered - am I Couldn't sleep and wouldn't sleep When love came and told me, I shouldn't sleep Bewitched, bothered and bewildered - am I Lost my heart, but what of it He is cold I agree He can laugh, but I love it Although the laugh's on me I'll sing to him, each spring to him And long, for the day when I'll cling to him Bewitched, bothered and bewildered - am I
Views: 85710 RoundMidnightTV
Ella Fitzgerald - Lullaby of the Leaves (Verve Records 1964)
 
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"Lullaby of the Leaves" written by Bernice Petkere and Joe Young for the 1932 Broadway revue, "Chamberlain Brown's Scrap Book, " was recorded by Keely Smith in 1959 on her album "Politely" with Billy May and his Orchestra for Capitol Records. Ella's accompanied by Zoot Sims (ts) and Frank DeVol (cnd, arr). Recorded March 4, 1964. (Verve Records) Rustling of the leaves used to be my lullaby, Days so long ago when I was a tot so And now that I have grown And myself alone. Cradle me where southern skies can watch me with a million eyes, Oh sing me to sleep, Lullaby of the leaves Cover me with heavens blue and let me dream a dream or two, Oh sing me to sleep, Lullaby of the leaves. I'm breezing along, along with the breeze, I'm hearing a song, a song thru the trees, Ooh ooh ooh ooh ooh ooh. That pine melody caressing the shore familiar to me, I've heard it Before ooh ooh ooh ooh. That's heaven, dont I feel it in my soul, And dont I know I've reached my goal, Oh sing me to sleep, Lullaby of the Leaves Lullaby of the Leaves
Views: 79937 RoundMidnightTV
Sarah Vaughan - I Feel Pretty (Live from Sweden) Mercury Records 1964
 
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"I Feel Pretty" is a song by Leonard Bernstein and Stephen Sondheim which was originally from the the 1957 recording of a Broadway production of the musical West Side Story. Sarah's accompanied by Kirk Stuart (piano), Charles "Buster" Williams (bass), and Georges Hughes (drums). Recorded in Sweden, 1964. (Mercury Records) Thank you! I feel pretty Oh so pretty I feel pretty and witty and bright And I pity Anyone who isn't me tonight I feel charming Oh so charming It's alarming how charming I feel And so pretty I hardly can believe it's real See that pretty girl in that mirror there? Who can that attractive girl be? Such a pretty face Such a pretty dress Such a pretty smile Such a pretty me! I feel stunning Oh so stunning Feel like running And jumping for joy For I'm loved By a pretty wonderful boy I feel pretty Oh so pretty I feel pretty and witty and bright And I pity Anyone who isn't me tonight I feel charming Oh so charming It's alarming how charming I feel And so pretty I hardly can believe it's real See that pretty girl in that mirror there? Who can that attractive girl be? Such a pretty face Such a pretty dress Such a pretty smile Such a pretty me! I feel stunning Oh so stunning Feel like running And jumping for joy For I'm loved By a pretty wonderful boy For I'm loved By a pretty wonderful boy
Views: 53112 RoundMidnightTV
Diana Ross - Good Morning Heartache (Motown Records 1972)
 
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"Good Morning Heartache" (Decca Records) is a song written by Irene Higginbotham, Ervin Drake, and Dan Fisher. Originally recorded by jazz singer Billie Holiday on January 22, 1946. Lady Sings the Blues is a 1972 American biographical drama film directed by Sidney J. Furie about jazz singer Billie Holiday loosely based on her 1956 autobiography which, in turn, took its title from one of Holiday's most popular songs. It was produced by Motown Productions for Paramount Pictures. Diana Ross portrayed Holiday, alongside a cast including Billy Dee Williams, Richard Pryor, James T. Callahan, and Scatman Crothers. It was nominated for five Academy Awards. The nominations were for Best Actress in a Leading Role (Diana Ross), Best Art Direction-Set Decoration (Carl Anderson and Reg Allen), Best Costume Design, Best Music, Original Song Score and Adaptation (Gil Askey) and Best Writing, Story and Screenplay Based on Factual Material or Material Not Previously Published or Produced] The film was also screened at the 1973 Cannes Film Festival, but was not entered into the main competition. The film earned an estimated $9,050,000 in North American rentals in 1973. Motown released a hugely successful soundtrack double-album of Ross' recordings of Billie Holiday songs from the film, also titled Lady Sings the Blues. The album went to number one on the Billboard Hot 200 Album Charts, for the week-ending dates of April 7 and 14, 1973. Good morning heartache You old gloomy sight Good morning heartache Thought we said goodbye last night I turned and tossed until it seems you have gone But here you are with the dawn Wish I forget you but you're here to stay It seems I met you When my love went away Now everyday I start by saying to you Good morning heartache what's new? Stop haunting me now Can't shake you nohowJust leave me alone I've got those Monday blues Straight through Sunday blues Good morning heartache here we go again Good morning heartache You're the one Who knew me when Might as well get used to you hanging around Good morning heartacheSit down (bridge) Stop haunting me now Can't shake you nohow Just leave me alone I've got those Monday blues Straight through Sunday blues Good morning heartache Here we go again Good morning heartache You're the one Who knew me when Might as well get use to you hanging around Good morning heartache Sit down
Views: 36287 RoundMidnightTV
Ella Fitzgerald & Teddy Wilson - My Melancholy Baby (Brunswick Records 1936)
 
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"My Melancholy Baby" is a popular song published in 1912 and first sung publicly by William Frawley. The music was written by Ernie Burnett, the lyrics by George A. Norton. Despite its published title, in conversation it often is referred to simply as "Melancholy Baby," without the word "My". Ella Fitzgerald accompanied by Frank Newton (tp), Benny Morton (tb), Jerry Blake (as, cl), Ted Mcrae (ts), Teddy Wilson (p), John Trueheart (g), Lennie Stanfield (b), and Cozy Cole (d). Recorded in New York, March 17, 1936. (Brunswick Records) Come to me, my melancholy baby Cuddle up and don't be blue All your fears are foolish fancy, maybe You know, dear, that I'm in love with you Every cloud must have a silver lining Wait until the sun shines through Cuddle up, my dear While, I kiss away each tear Or else, I shall be melancholy too Every cloud must have a silver lining Wait until the sun shines through Please, cuddle up, my dear While, I kiss away each tear Or else, I shall be melancholy too
Views: 94264 RoundMidnightTV
Sarah Vaughan - Baubles, Bangles And Beads (Live from Sweden) Mercury Records 1964
 
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"Baubles, Bangles & Beads" is a popular song from the 1953 musical Kismet, credited to Robert Wright and George Forrest. Like all the music in that show, the melody was based on works by Alexander Borodin, in this case the second theme of the second movement of his String Quartet in D. The "Kismet" setting maintains the original's 3/4 waltz rhythm; pop music settings change the rhythm to a moderate four-beat accompaniment. Jazz musicians are especially drawn to the song's beguiling melody and advanced harmonic structure. The familiar AA'BA+Coda structure of the song is energized by a key change up a major third interval for every section; the transition is marked by a bracing harmonic progression from the central major key of one section to the tritone minor key of the following section. Jazz players and singers have enjoyed the musical challenges of this song for decades. The best-selling version of the song was recorded by Peggy Lee in 1954. Other versions were recorded that year by Lu Ann Simms, Georgia Gibbs, and Frank Sinatra. The Kirby Stone Four re-make hit the Billboard Top 100 in 1958 and remains a favorite on adult standard stations. (Eumir) Deodato recorded an instrumental in a hit LP of 1973. But the most curious version is that one that mixed the scherzo of Borodin's string quartet No. 2 with this piece of music, arranged by the Argentine Ernesto Acher under the name Borodin, Bangles & Beads in 1987 on his album "Juegos" Sarah's accompanied by Kirk Stuart (piano), Charles "Buster" Williams (bass), and Georges Hughes (drums). Recorded in Sweden, 1964. (Mercury Records) Baubles, bangles, hear how they jing, jinga-linga Baubles, bangles, bright shiny beads Sparkles, spangles, my heart will sing, singa-linga Wearin' baubles, bangles and beads I'm just a glitter and gleam so Make somebody dream so that Maybe he may buy me a ring, ringa-linga I've heard that's where it leads Wearin' baubles, bangles, and beads Baubles, bangles, hear how they jing, jinga-linga Baubles, bangles, bright, shiny beads Sparkles, spangles, my heart will sing, singa-linga Wearin' baubles, bangles, and beads I'm just glitter and gleam so Make somebody dream so that Maybe a he may, buy me a ring, ringa-linga I've heard that that's where it leads Wearin' baubles and bangles, sparkles, spangles Loads and loads of baubles, just give me those bangles I gotta have sparkels, bangles and beads
Views: 55520 RoundMidnightTV
Clifford Brown - Laura (EmArcy Records 1955)
 
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"Laura" is a 1945 popular song. The music was composed by David Raksin for the 1944 movie Laura starring Gene Tierney and Dana Andrews, and is heard frequently in the movie. The lyrics were written by Johnny Mercer after the film had made the tune popular. According to Mercer, he had not yet seen the movie when he wrote the lyrics, but was aware that it was a romantic, somewhat haunting story. The song has become a jazz standard, with more than 400 known recordings. Some of the best-known versions are by Woody Herman, Johnny Johnston, Emil Newman, David Rose, Billy Eckstine, Charlie Parker, J. J. Johnson, Frank Sinatra and Julie London (included on her 1955 debut album Julie Is Her Name, Vol. 1). Clifford Brown (October 30, 1930 -- June 26, 1956), aka "Brownie," was an influential and highly rated American jazz trumpeter. He died aged 25, leaving behind only four years' worth of recordings. Nonetheless, he had a considerable influence on later jazz trumpet players, including Donald Byrd, Lee Morgan, Booker Little, Freddie Hubbard, Valery Ponomarev, and Wynton Marsalis. Benny Golson, who had done a stint in Lionel Hampton's band with Brown, wrote "I Remember Clifford" to honour his memory. The piece became a jazz standard, as musicians paid tribute by recording their own interpretations of it. Clifford on trumpet is accompanied by George Morrow (bass); Neal Hefti (conductor [strings]); Max Roach (drums); Barry Galbraith (guitar) and Richie Powell (piano). Laura is the face in the misty lights Footsteps that you hear down the hall The laugh that floats on a summer night That you can never quite recall And you see Laura on the train that is passing through Those eyes how familiar they seem She gave your very first kiss to you That was Laura but she's only a dream
Views: 83662 RoundMidnightTV
Sarah Vaughan - Sometimes I'm Happy (Live from Holland 1958)
 
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"Sometimes I'm Happy (Sometimes I'm Blue)" is a popular song. The music was written by Vincent Youmans, the lyrics by Irving Caesar. The song was published in 1927 and introduced in the Broadway musical Hit the Deck, starring Stanley Holloway, and opened in April, 1927. The song was performed in the musical by Charles King and Louise Groody, who also made a recording for Victor Records, catalog number 20609. The best-selling versions were by King and Groody and by Roger Wolfe Kahn (with vocal by Franklyn Baur), also issued by Victor (catalog number 20599). Two other versions, a duet by Baur and Gladys Rice on Columbia Records (catalog number 998-D) and a vocal by Vaughn De Leath on Brunswick Records (catalog number 3608) also had a significant degree of popularity. Sarah's accompanied by Richard Davis (Bass); Ronnell Bright (Piano); and Art Morgan (Drums). Sometimes I'm happy, sometimes I'm blue. My disposition depends on you. I never mind the rain from the sky If I can find the sun in your eyes. Sometimes I love you, sometimes I hate you. But when I hate you, it's 'cause I love you. That's how I am So what can I do? I'm happy when I'm with you. Sometimes I'm happy, sometimes I'm blue. My disposition depends on you. I never mind the rain from the sky If I can find the sun in your eyes. Sometimes I love you, sometimes I hate you. But when I hate you, it's 'cause I love you. That's how I am So what can I do? I'm always happy So very happy I'm always happy when I'm with you
Views: 78889 RoundMidnightTV
Sarah Vaughan ft Hal Mooney & His Studio Orchestra - Lush Life (Mercury Records 1956)
 
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"Lush Life" is a jazz standard with lyrics and music written by Billy Strayhorn from 1933 to 1938. However, the song was only performed privately by Strayhorn until he and vocalist Kay Davis performed it on November 13, 1948 with the Duke Ellington Orchestra at Carnegie Hall. It is usually performed in the key of D-flat major. The song's lyrics describe the author's weariness of the night life after a failed romance, wasting time with "jazz and cocktails" at "come-what-may places" and in the company of girls with "sad and sullen gray faces/with distingué traces". Strayhorn was only 16 when he wrote the majority of the song, which was to become his signature composition (along with "Take the "A" Train"). One of the most notable recordings of "Lush Life" was by Nat King Cole. John Coltrane also recorded it at least twice, once in 1958 as the title track of an album for Prestige Records, and again in 1963 with his "classic quartet" and Johnny Hartman singing. The Johnny Hartman version is considered definitive. The earlier version was 14 minutes long. But the author once said that the best version was of Billy Eckstine on his 1960 album No Cover, No Minimum. Sarah's accompanied by Hal Mooney & His Studio Orchestra. Recorded in New York, April 1, 1956. (Mercury Records) I used to visit all the very gay places Those come what may places Where one relaxes on the axis of the wheel of life To get the feel of life from jazz and cocktails The girls I knew had sad and sullen gray faces With distingué traces, that used to be there You could see where they'd been washed away By too many through the day, twelve o'clock tales Then you came along with your Siren song to tempt me to madness I thought for awhile that your poignant smile Was tinged with the sadness of a great love for me Ah yes, I was wrong, again, I was wrong Life is lonely again and only last year Everything seemed so sure, now life is awful again A trough full of hearts could only be a bore A week in Paris will ease the bite of it All I care is to smile in spite of it I'll forget you, I will, while yet you are still Burning inside my brain Romance is mush, stifling those who strive I'll live a lush life in some small dive And there I'll be, while I rot with the rest Of those whose lives are lonely too
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Sarah Vaughan - Prelude To A Kiss (Mercury Records 1954)
 
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"Prelude to a Kiss" is a 1938 song composed by Duke Ellington and Irving Mills, with lyrics by Irving Gordon. Sarah's accompanied by John Malachi (piano), Joe Benjamin (bass), and Roy Haynes (drums). Recorded in New York, April 2, 1954. (Mercury Records) If you hear A song in blue Like a flower crying For the dew That was my heart serenading you My prelude to a kiss If you hear a song that grows From my tender sentimental woes That was my heart trying to compose A prelude to a kiss Though it's just a simple melody With nothing fancy Nothing much You could turn it to a symphony A Shubert tune with a Gershwin touch Oh how my love song gently cries For the tenderness within your eyes My love is a prelude that never dies A prelude to a kiss
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