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Videos uploaded by user “Ralph S Bacon”
#90 When GOOD 😇 components go BAD 👿
 
15:50
Many of us Arduinites are blessed to be able to order items from the Far East, where components are plentiful and cheap. What we all hope, of course, is that cheap does not mean cheap-and-nasty, and for the most part the items are all fine and fit-for-purpose. But occasionally good components go bad, sometimes through poor quality control (QA) or poor circuit design or even poor component selection. So we must accept that some component modules are built down to a price (not up to a particular standard) so that they can compete for our Dollars (or Pounds, Euros or Roubles). Price is king in most non-commercial environments (that's us hobbyists!) so we have to accept that failures can (and do) occasionally happen. Watch the video for some examples of recent failures, one of which could have been particularly nasty! And I've learned my lesson that sometimes it pays to pay a bit more for critical components that have actually got some QA applied to them. Live and learn, hey? ===== LINKS ===== Schematic for the W1209 Thermostat board https://github.com/TG9541/stm8ef/wiki/Board-W1209 (scroll right to the bottom of the file) eBay Goodies for the price of a cup of coffee (Video #86) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O3WRvSbmH8M --- If you like this video please give it a thumbs up, share it and if you're not already subscribed please do so :) My channel is here: ------------------------------------------------------------------ https://www.youtube.com/c/RalphBacon ------------------------------------------------------------------ How can I remember this? Memory tip: "See" Ralph Bacon, geddit? [You can also use this link: https://www.youtube.com/RalphBacon]
Views: 3092 Ralph S Bacon
#81 eBay Goodies Update
 
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Sometimes you don't need a full-blown Arduino-type microcontroller for a simple job. This eBay product fits the bill perfectly, is well-priced (I couldn't make it for this price) and it's a whole lot easier than getting an Arduino running. And it is working right now on my desk providing cheap, reliable service. What's the product? See the video! On other occasions nothing but an Arduino will meet your needs - but do you *really* need an Uno or Nano to run some simple sketch? Simple in terms of the sketch but complex enough to warrant GPIO connectivity with the logic that goes with that. What are the limitations, if any? Not much, is the answer. Can it run just like a standard Uno or Nano? Oh, yes! So what am I suggesting? Watch the video! eBay is a constant source of amazement and inspiration to me. Not just eBay of course; Banggood, Gearbest, AliExpress and Tomtop are other Far Eastern supplies (to name just a few) that have proven themselves to be honest, reliable suppliers of electronic equipment at prices that we can all afford, even if only on an occasional basis. It's often worthwhile to "window shop" just to see what's available - you never know, that left-handed, Bluetooth-enabled widget you were after might be waiting for you! --- If you like this video please give it a thumbs up, share it and if you're not already subscribed please do so :) My channel is here: ------------------------------------------------------------------ https://www.youtube.com/c/RalphBacon ------------------------------------------------------------------ How can I remember this? Memory tip: "See" Ralph Bacon, geddit?
Views: 2567 Ralph S Bacon
#19 How to use a Rotary Encoder with an Interrupt routine on your Arduino
 
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A rotary encoder is a useful type of switch but what exactly does it do and how do you implement it? And how do you use an Interrupt routine to reliably detect the pulses? Here I explain what it's all about and why it's such a useful (and cheap) building block for your Arduino project. It is amazingly easy to implement with just a few lines of code and will doubtless be of use in your next Arduino project! The final code used in this example can be found here: https://github.com/RalphBacon/RotaryEncoderUpdate (Note this contains more sketches for another Rotary Encoder video - you need the sketch called "RotaryEncoderInterrrupts.ino") As always, Thanks For Watching. My channel and blog are here: ------------------------------------------------------------------ https://www.youtube.com/RalphBacon https://ralphbacon.blog ------------------------------------------------------------------
Views: 54878 Ralph S Bacon
Where's Ralph?
 
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A quick FYI about future videos (Nov 2018). MORE DETAILS ON MY BLOG: https://ralphbacon.blog When I've recovered from my op this video will disappear and will be replaced by a proper one!
Views: 1963 Ralph S Bacon
#18 Add a Relay Module to your Arduino project - Hints, Tips & Traps
 
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Wow! Who knew that adding a typical 5-volt relay module to your Arduino could be so easy yet at the same time harbour some gotchas that will make you wonder what's going on? If you need to drive some external circuitry from your Arduino module then a relay module is a fantastic item to use - but there are some gotchas to be aware of, and having some knowledge in how they work will help you refine your project. I give you the low down on what makes these tick and how to avoid some potential traps that could leave you scratching your head! PLEASE NOTE: In July 2017, an observant Arduinite (#Alexus) has spotted that the circuit diagram for this device is wrong - there should be no direct connection between the collector of Q1 and JD-VCC as that would be a short circuit whenever Q1 was switched on! Luckily the actual device is fine, just the circuit diagram that is wrong. As always, Thanks For Watching. And my channel is here: https://www.youtube.com/c/RalphBacon How can I remember this? Memory tip: "See" Ralph Bacon, geddit?
Views: 17235 Ralph S Bacon
#71 How to create an Arduino Library - easy!
 
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New! https://ralphbacon.blog We all use libraries when writing Arduino sketches but how do you go about creating your own, even if they are for your OWN use just to organise your code better? I'll talk you through a complete example, end to end, that shows you exactly how to create a library that simplifies the remaining code in your sketch, thus allowing you to concentrate on what you are now developing rather than the mature, stable code functions you've already written. Once you've done it once you'll see how useful it can be even with quite modest sketches. And, of course, if you have to tweak your library code then there's nothing stopping you doing that later either. The demo sketch, plus the libraries we created during the video can be found here: ---------------------------------------------------------- Sample demo library code in GitHub ---------------------------------------------------------- *** Remember to put the library files (.cpp, .h and keywords.txt) into a folder *** called "TestLibrary" in the libraries folder under your Arduino sketch folder. *** Then put the sketch file (.ino) in a folder in your normal Arduino sketch folder. Just click the download button on this page to get a zipped file of the above. http://bit.ly/ArduinoLibrary --------------------------------------------------------------------------- Here are the links that I mentioned in the video: --------------------------------------------------------------------------- All about Arduino IDE keywords https://spencer.bliven.us/index.php/2012/01/18/arduino-ide-keywords/ The Arduino Library specification https://github.com/arduino/Arduino/wiki/Arduino-IDE-1.5:-Library-specification --------------------------------------------------------------------------- And finally... --------------------------------------------------------------------------- If you like this video please give it a thumbs up, share it and if you're not already subscribed please do so :) My channel is here: ------------------------------------------------------------------ https://www.youtube.com/c/RalphBacon ------------------------------------------------------------------ How can I remember this? Memory tip: "See" Ralph Bacon, geddit?
Views: 53640 Ralph S Bacon
#73 nRF24L01 Send (and receive) data with your Arduino!
 
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New! https://ralphbacon.blog Use your Arduino to transmit (and receive) data reliably with this easy-to-use module. The nRF24L01 module achieves this beautifully - and with the excellent RF24 library from TMRh20 we can do just about anything you might think of. However, in this absolute beginners' guide, we just scratch the surface but still managed to produce a useful transmit and receive sketch (originally taken from the above library but simplified even further). The nRF24L01+ boards (but available in many places): https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B010N32X3U The breakout board that prevents power-related issues: https://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B00NJCB7FS The library I use is very mature, s/he has several others too. See his/her homepage here, choose the RF24 library as I showed in the video. https://github.com/TMRh20 or a copy from here: https://github.com/RalphBacon/nRF24L01-transceiver or here https://github.com/nRF24/RF24 (thanks Ed19601) Note that there are several good nRF24L01 libraries available out there. If you use another one bear in mind that the pin connections will be different. I chose the one above as it seemed to give us Arduinites a decent interface to the nRF24L01 module without too much mucking around. My sketches (one for receive, one for transmit) even though both do actually transmit anyway (remember that each module will automatically acknowledge receipt of data unless you specifically switch off that capability - why would you do this?). IMPORTANT NOTE: thanks to the Eagle Eyes of Arduinite viewer whitefields5595 please remember that pin 10, although not connected to the nRF24L01+ in this demo must NOT be used as a general purpose IO pin - it remains the standard CS pin of the SPI bus - and if that doesn't mean much just remember to leave pin 10 on your Uno or Nano unconnected whilst running this sketch! ------------------------------ DOWNLOAD HERE ------------------------------ https://github.com/RalphBacon/nRF24L01-transceiver --- click the Download button and choose the zip file, unzip and place each sketch in its own folder (of the same name as the sketch) in your usual Arduino sketches folder. If you like this video please give it a thumbs up, share it and if you're not already subscribed please do so :) My channel is here: ------------------------------------------------------------------ https://www.youtube.com/c/RalphBacon ------------------------------------------------------------------ How can I remember this? Memory tip: "See" Ralph Bacon, geddit?
Views: 64631 Ralph S Bacon
#5 Arduino compatible Real Time Clock modules (RTC) - DS1307 & DS3231
 
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Adding a Real Time Clock to your Arduino project is EASY and I'll show you how. RTC modules cost very little and can be added to your project to add data-logging or anything where you need the date and time. Just four wires and you can connect an RTC to your Arduino or other microcontroller that uses the I2C bus. Easy. Sketch can be found here: https://github.com/RalphBacon/DS1307-DS3231-Real-Time-Clocks See further videos in this series in this playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLZHhGaUUFqq19x1LamrZglw4IWM2DxdIp And my channel is here: https://www.youtube.com/c/RalphBacon How can I remember this? Memory tip: "See" Ralph Bacon, geddit?
Views: 16086 Ralph S Bacon
Welcome! This is my YouTube Channel Trailer...
 
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Welcome to my Arduino & Electronics Channel! In just 60 seconds you can get a flavour of what to expect, and how EASY it is to put these cheap modules together to do interesting things. Follow me in my journey of Arduino and all things electronic to create some easy-to-use projects that were also very easy to put together. And my channel is here: https://www.youtube.com/c/RalphBacon How can I remember this? Memory tip: "See" Ralph Bacon, geddit?
Views: 11537 Ralph S Bacon
#49 MORE PINS PLEASE! PCF8574 Arduino Pin Extender (Easy)
 
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Too few pins on your Arduino? Use this I2C controlled pin extender (with optional interrupt) to make life easier! All sketches and other stuff can be found here on GitHub: https://github.com/RalphBacon/PCF8574-Pin-Extender-I2C There are three sketches here, starting with the simplest one, an LED flasher. Well, an LED alternator might be a better description and just ensures you have wired it all up correctly (only four wires: two for power and the two I2C SDA, SCL). I then outputs via I2C a HIGH (value 0 - different to Arduino) to turn ON the LED. If the above statement seemed a bit odd, remember that the PCF8574 will SINK the current, not source it, so we have to make the pin there LOW to let current rush in and thereby light up the LED (or turn on the relay, whatever you have connected). The second sketch shows some INPUT use as well as OUTPUT so you can detect switches being pressed. Here the ultimate lesson is to understand that although you send a READ request of 1 byte to the PCF8574 and you get back all 8 bits indicating which pins are currently LOW, the ones you have used as OUTPUTs previously should be ignored (they value returned contains no meaning, it might be a 0, it might be a 1). Finally, the third sketch shows how we can use the interrupt pin on the PCF8574 to drive the interrupt pin on the Arduino LOW or HIGH to signal that one or more pins have now changed value (eg a switch has been pressed or released). Using interrupts is optional as you can just scan (poll) the PCF8754 for changes but it's not very efficient to do that if you are also trying to do 'other stuff' with your Arduino. We don't use any libraries (although plenty exist for the PCF8574) as it's more useful to understand what it going on. The only library we require is the standard Wire library for the I2C use. All sketches and other stuff can be found here on GitHub: https://github.com/RalphBacon/PCF8574-Pin-Extender-I2C Finally, here's a link to some very useful print routines, although the one we're interested in here is for printing binary values to the Serial window: http://www.phanderson.com/arduino/arduino_display.html Any queries or comments, just put them at the bottom of the video and I'll do my best to answer! Once again, thanks for watching and please do spread the word, give me a thumbs up if you like the video and don't forget to subscribe to get notification of further (just about weekly) videos going forward!
Views: 14819 Ralph S Bacon
#8 Simple Demo of Binary Coded Decimal (BCD) for Real Time Clocks (such as the DS3231 and DS1307)
 
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A very quick explanation of Binary Coded Decimal (BCD) as used in the Real Time Clock modules DS3231 and DS1307 often used in Arduino projects. Also a 60-second trick to convert any decimal number to binary. You don't have to know this to work with those clock modules but it can help you understand what's going on in some of the C++ code. It's painless and easy once you understand the concept. And my channel is here: https://www.youtube.com/c/RalphBacon How can I remember this? Memory tip: "See" Ralph Bacon, geddit?
Views: 1689 Ralph S Bacon
#37 Controlling your Arduino from your phone - Part 2 (the App)
 
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Bluetooth IOT Control anything using your Smartphone & an Arduino Join me in creating the Android phone app for controlling an HC-05 or HC-06 Bluetooth module. It's as easy as putting a puzzle together (large pieces, ages 6-9!) and once you have started it's easy to create complex programs quickly. You can download the App and install it on your phone as well as the project for the code in "MIT App Inventor 2" so you get the "source code" and can then tweak it any way you want. The links that you may need after following the video are right here in the GitHub: https://github.com/RalphBacon/BluetoothIOT They consist of, individually: The Android Phone App - send it to your phone in an email, click the attachment and install it using the Package Installer The "MIT App Inventor 2" source code project, also known as the ".aia file". Save this on your PC and import it to the website as shown in the video - then you will have exactly my source code and can tweak it as you please To speed things up, here is the webpage for the MIT App Inventor: (it may prompt you to sign in) http://appinventor.mit.edu/explore/get-started.html As I mentioned in the video, please suggest practical applications for using Bluetooth from your phone to control an Arduino and we will see what fantastic projects people come up with. As always, Thanks For Watching! If you like this video please give it a thumbs up, share and if not already subscribed please do so :) And my channel is here: https://www.youtube.com/c/RalphBacon How can I remember this? Memory tip: "See" Ralph Bacon, geddit?
Views: 2559 Ralph S Bacon
#53 Protect your Arduino - use an Opto Isolator! And RGB sound-to-light demo
 
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New! https:/ralphbacon.blog Connecting your Arduino to other equipment to make it 'intelligent' is tempting but fraught with danger. I'll show you how to use an opto-isolator (aka opto-coupler) to reduce the chance of cross-equipment malfunction to a minimum. The two halves of the PC817-series isolators are totally isolated (yes, the clue is in the name) allowing you to drive a signal to your Arduino without your Arduino being exposed to external signal and voltage levels that may harm it. It's easy and cheap (see below where I bought this from) and should be considered an essential way of connecting Arduinos to 3rd party equipment! I also demonstrate the RGB (Red Green Blue) LED with my sound-to-light unit (microphone preamplifier) which looks fantastic. Even on camera where the colours always get washed out a bit it still looks great. Component sources: *PC817* http://www.banggood.com/5V-5mA-PC817-LTV817-EL817C-Optokoppler-Photocoupler-Optocoupler-p-921109.html but don't buy them individually, you can get 10 for £1 if you search eBay! *RGB module* (only buy it like this for experimentation, buy them loose to put into your projects) 10-pack: http://www.banggood.com/10Pcs-KY-016-RGB-3-Color-LED-Module-For-Arduino-Red-Green-Blue-p-954087.html You can get them _individually_ too, either loose or on a module board. If you like this video please give it a thumbs up, share and if not already subscribed please do so :) And my channel is here: ----------------------------------------------------------------- https://www.youtube.com/c/RalphBacon ------------------------------------------------------------------ How can I remember this? Memory tip: "See" Ralph Bacon, geddit?
Views: 8842 Ralph S Bacon
#40 Let the music play! Arduino based MP3 Player for music (or announcements)
 
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Let the music play! This module can most certainly be used as a custom, Arduino-controlled player of music, in a pub or restaurant, for example, but it could equally be used to give out warning messages or instructions "3D printer has run out of material!" in a factory or workshop. The possibilities are endless. All you have to do is record your .mp3 or .wav files, put them onto a micro SD card, referred to as a TF TransFlash card in the documentation and you're good to go. We're not using any libraries in this demo, so that you can see exactly how the commands are sent to the MP3 player and how the optional responses are returned too. It also demonstrates how easy it is to send out those commands via the SoftwareSerial library; why not the standard Serial port? Watch the video to find out! However, you may feel more comfortable using the DFRobot MP3 Player library so I've included that in the links below. Just be aware that we have not experimented with that library in the video, but it looks very easy to use and takes away all the work, aka pain, in creating the command strings. The library contains some examples that should get you going nicely too. ----------------------------------------------- UPDATE UPDATE UPDATE ----------------------------------------------- Just to clarify some queries some viewers had: YES you can play SPECIFIC tracks (that is, you can, if you want, play track 6 then track 1, then track 123). However, I haven't demonstrated that here (we just play them sequentially) but if you look at the code for the Wireless Rain Receiver (video #48) you'll see an example where I play different tracks depending on the level of rain detected. Many thanks to Purple Planet for their music - link below Music: http://www.purple-planet.com ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- STOP! READ THIS IF YOU VALUE YOUR MP3 PLAYER MODULE ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- The RX and TX from the Arduino Uno or Nano will be 5V and will damage the MP3 player which requires 3.3V on these pins. All explained in the video! I've included as many links below as I could find and I *strongly* recommend you print out the ones I've marked as you'll be referring to them often! -------------------------------------------------------------- Essential reading - recommended print -------------------------------------------------------------- (Note: ALL these links etc can be found here: https://github.com/RalphBacon/MP3-Player-DFPlayer) 1. The DFrobot Wiki for the DFPlayer http://www.dfrobot.com/wiki/index.php/DFPlayer_Mini_SKU:DFR0299 2. Link to the Mini DF Player Manual - more technical but essential if you want to know the commands https://github.com/RalphBacon/MP3-Player-DFPlayer 3. Link to the sketch used in the demo: https://github.com/RalphBacon/MP3-Player-DFPlayer ------------------------------- Further information ------------------------------- 1. A massive amount of extra information from Yerke, via the Banggood forum (link was recently down but may reappear) http://forum.banggood.com/forum-topic-59997.html 2. How to insert an advert track and then resume playing the original http://www.dfrobot.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=2&t=1524 3. More on where I go the music for this demo http://www.purple-planet.com/using-our-royalty-free-music/4583818250 4. The DFPlayer library (not used in this video but easy to use) https://github.com/DFRobot/DFPlayer-Mini-mp3 All this can be found in Github: https://github.com/RalphBacon/MP3-Player-DFPlayer If you like this video please give it a thumbs up, share and if not already subscribed please do so And my channel is here: ----------------------------------------------------------------- https://www.youtube.com/c/RalphBacon ------------------------------------------------------------------ How can I remember this? Memory tip: "See" Ralph Bacon, geddit? As always Thanks for Watching!
Views: 22085 Ralph S Bacon
#66 AT Tiny85 Digispark - Arduino UNO alternative? An introduction!
 
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New! https://ralphbacon.blog Sometimes you only need a cheap, tiny microcontroller and the Atmel Tiny85 may be just the job. It's physically small (the clue's in the name) but it has lots of capability - just not very many GPIO pins. Don't get me wrong; Microchip/Atmel are not promoting this chip as any kind of substitute for a full-blown ATmega328P but in some cases (like my simple fridge door alarm in Video #41 & #42) the AT Tiny85 could easily be sufficient. And this Digispark (as Sparkfun call their implementation) can use I2C (software emulated) so you can always extend the number of pins with a pin extender too! This video introduces you to this miniscule device and shows you its capabilities as well as its limitations - I'll explore it further in a future video but for now this may whet your appetite. And given its extremely low cost (about £1 or $1.40) it's worth investigating. Allowing it to be programmed via the Arduino IDE is relatively straightforward (although I wish I had discovered the Sparkfun page to walk me through the process before I had single-handedly struggled through!) and it's just easy to use. And, just like the Leonardo it can connect to Windows and act as a keyboard or mouse (but caution! watch what happens in the video) without any further drivers. Lots of helpful links (but watch the video regarding installation) http://www.electroschematics.com/12102/learn-to-use-attiny85-usb-mini-development-board/ Connecting your device (watch the video first though): 1. http://digistump.com/wiki/digispark/tutorials/connecting 2. http://digistump.com/wiki/digispark/tutorials/modelbi2c Updated files for Arduino IDE integration https://github.com/digistump/DigistumpArduino Data sheet: http://www.atmel.com/images/atmel-2586-avr-8-bit-microcontroller-attiny25-attiny45-attiny85_datasheet.pdf Additional boards manager entry: http://digistump.com/package_digistump_index.json The DigiKeyboard.h (turns the device into a Windows keyboard) Note: this is now deprecated but still works just fine. Or use the one in the 'Updated Files' above. https://github.com/digistump/DigisparkArduinoIntegration If you like this video please give it a thumbs up, share it and if you're not already subscribed please do so :) My channel is here: ------------------------------------------------------------------ https://www.youtube.com/c/RalphBacon ------------------------------------------------------------------ How can I remember this? Memory tip: "See" Ralph Bacon, geddit?
Views: 17172 Ralph S Bacon
#104 ADS1115 Analog-to-Digital Converter for Arduino, Pi 🥧& All (2018)
 
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New! https://ralphbacon.blog The analog accuracy and sensitivity of the standard Uno / Nano pins is about 5mv per 'step' that we can read from executing an AnalogRead. Fine for many purposes but not so great if you're trying to measure at sub-millivolt levels. And if you have an ESP8266 with just one input, or a Raspberry Pi with no analog pins at all this could be the answer you're looking for. Enter the ADS1115 analog-to-digital I2C converter with a maximum resolution of 0.184mV per 'step', although as this device has a Programmable Gain Amplifier (PGA) on board it's easy to change that. Nothing is perfect, though, so watch the video for some gotchas and coding techniques we can use to maximize the usefulness of this I2C (two-wire) device. Sketch used in the demo (including the averaging function) is in the Github. https://github.com/RalphBacon/ADS1115-ADC Where I bought my ADS1115 ADC https://www.aliexpress.com/item/ADS1115-ADC-ultra-compact-16-precision-ADC-module-development-board/32313388618.html Adafruit do a library and everything! Not used in this demo but doubtless worth a look. https://www.adafruit.com/product/1085 https://learn.adafruit.com/adafruit-4-channel-adc-breakouts?view=all Datasheet is in the GitHub, worth reading the bit about registers. https://github.com/RalphBacon/ADS1115-ADC
Views: 7984 Ralph S Bacon
#83 Colour Touch Screen TFT LCD for your Arduino - Cheap & Easy
 
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New! https://ralphbacon.blog Using a colour touch screen may seem daunting but with the right library and example code it can add a WOW factor to your projects. As a bonus it even includes an SD card reader / writer. I'll show you how to get started with a very popular variant of the TFT touch screen, including how to make a "button" (spoiler alert: it's not a button just an area of screen that looks like one, that you can then receive touches from). It's cheap, easy and allows you to dispense with physical buttons and switches on your project's front panel too! ---------- LINKS ---------- All code, sketches and backup libraries are here: https://github.com/RalphBacon/TFT-LCD-Display-2.4-2.8-Touch-Shield ---------------------------------------- Main links repeated here: ---------------------------------------- 2.4 Inch TFT LCD Shield Touch Board Display Module For Arduino UNO (Banggood) http://www.banggood.com/2_4-Inch-TFT-LCD-Shield-Touch-Board-Display-Module-For-Arduino-UNO-p-940735.html (If link is broken just search Banggood for 2.4" TFT LCD - but DO check it's the right one) Adafruit 2.8" TFT Touch Shield v2 - Capacitive or Resistive https://cdn-learn.adafruit.com/downloads/pdf/adafruit-2-8-tft-touch-shield-v2.pdf Adafruit libraries for 2.4" AND 2.8" TFT touchscreen (with SD card) https://github.com/adafruit/TFTLCD-Library Everything you wanted to know about the Adafruit GFX library (core graphics library) https://learn.adafruit.com/adafruit-gfx-graphics-library https://cdn-learn.adafruit.com/downloads/pdf/adafruit-gfx-graphics-library.pdf and can be downloaded here: https://github.com/adafruit/Adafruit-GFX-Library/ Note: 'Fonts' folder contains bitmap fonts for use with recent (1.1 and later) Adafruit_GFX. Adafruit invests time and resources providing this open source code, please support Adafruit and open-source hardware by purchasing products from Adafruit! --- If you like this video please give it a thumbs up, share it and if you're not already subscribed please do so :) My channel is here: ------------------------------------------------------------------ https://www.youtube.com/c/RalphBacon ------------------------------------------------------------------ How can I remember this? Memory tip: "See" Ralph Bacon, geddit?
Views: 34546 Ralph S Bacon
#84 Making the ATTiny85 easier to program
 
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So you have your ATTiny85 all connected up and running your latest sketch. Great. Oh, not great? Something is not quite right but you can't put your finger on what is wrong. Have you debugged the code? Oh, I SEE - YOU CAN'T because you can't connect the ATTiny85 to the USB port of your Arduino IDE, right? Wrong. It's very easy to get your Tiny connected up to your Arduino IDE (or, indeed, any other serial monitor) to display all those useful Serial.println statements to find out just what is happening. But there are more ways than one to skin a c-- erm, let's not say that, Benny is watching me type this! Suffice to say, there are some useful techniques over and above the obvious, so keep watching! No sketch this week (as I'm demonstrating the method for ANY sketch) so it will be even easier than usual to implement this tip! Send Only Software Serial Library Included on the GitHub repository, just download, unzip and use! Thanks to Nick Gammon (again). ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- GITHUB Repository here - everything you need https://github.com/RalphBacon/ATTiny85-Easy-Debugging ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ I also talk about using physical Pin 1 (P5) as a standard GPIO pin instead of it being reserved as a RESET pin. And talk about it is all I do here because you will have to wait for the next video on exactly how to do it -- oops! Benny says Shhh, stop giving away the plot, so I will stay stumm until that video arrives! If you like this video please give it a thumbs up, share it and if you're not already subscribed please do so :) My channel is here: https://www.youtube.com/c/RalphBacon How can I remember this? Memory tip: "See" Ralph Bacon, geddit?
Views: 10126 Ralph S Bacon
#31 Load Cell project (part 1) Arduino Micro problems plus postman deliveries
 
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Want to weigh something with uncanny precision? Use a Load Cell and an HX711 detector and you're in business! A what cell? All will be explained. And it is so very easy you will be amazed. The sketch can be found here on my GitHub: https://github.com/RalphBacon/Load-Cell-Part-1 Calibration and seed-setting sketches can also be found here: https://github.com/RalphBacon/Load-Cell-Part-1 The library can be found here: https://github.com/bogde/HX711 And if you use an Arduino Micro or Sparkfun Pro Micro what do you have to guard against if you don't want a 'bricked' Arduino? Watch to find out. Yes, it happened to me, don't let it happen to you. And what has the postman delivered lately? A stepper motor, an Arduino Mega, an RFID ... well, watch and find out. And for the completion of the LOAD CELL project don't miss the next video part 2 which will concentrate on the way I've mounted the hardware, the software with some simple demo code - easy. That's all coming in Part 2 (video #32). Link to the load cell (500g) that I bought: http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Aluminum-Electronic-Balance-Four-Wire-Weighing-Load-Cell-Sensor-YCZ-191-500g-/191598861371 As always, Thanks For Watching and don't forget to subscribe so you don't miss future episodes. And my channel is here: ------------------------------------------------------------------ https://www.youtube.com/c/RalphBacon ------------------------------------------------------------------ How can I remember this? Memory tip: "See" Ralph Bacon, geddit?
Views: 61347 Ralph S Bacon
#65 Arduino EEPROM Basics - easy to do and useful to implement
 
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New! https://ralphbacon.blog Storing data into non-volatile EEPROM memory (that does not lose that information when the Arduino is switched off) can be very useful, whether that's for remembering some configuration settings or the high score of your latest game. Best of all, it's so easy to do these days as you don't have to know how long the data is for the data-type you're trying to store (nor do you have to switch the high and low end bytes around either - see what I mean?) So don't forget the last value you calculated; use the EEPROM instead of an SD card - you can write to the same cell 100,000 times so you might not need an SD card at all in certain data logging situations. Knowing how to do this is all part of the Arduino learning experience and here I actually implement an improvement to one of my existing projects (in daily [well, nightly] use) to make using it just that tad easier. The sketch I'm using builds upon an earlier sketch for the project I have now enhanced but it will be child's play to use those lines in your code. I've included the sketch used in the video here just for completeness: http://bit.ly/EEPROM_basics Background C# 'struct' information http://playground.arduino.cc/Code/Struct Writing ANY data type to EEPROM background (now part of standard EEPROM library): http://playground.arduino.cc/Code/EEPROMWriteAnything The standard EEPROM library functions: https://www.arduino.cc/en/Reference/EEPROM For advanced users, the extended EEPROM library (includes bit writing) http://playground.arduino.cc/Code/EEPROMex If you like this video please give it a thumbs up, share it and if you're not already subscribed please do so :) My channel is here: ------------------------------------------------------------------ https://www.youtube.com/c/RalphBacon ------------------------------------------------------------------ How can I remember this? Memory tip: "See" Ralph Bacon, geddit?
Views: 17590 Ralph S Bacon
#115 Put your Arduino to Sleep 💤 (using wake up 🚩 INTERRUPT)
 
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Running an Arduino (Uno/Nano etc) is a general no-no because they consume too much power. But here we explore how to put the ATMEGA328P chip to sleep and then wake up again when a pin goes low (using an interrupt, generated with a switch). It's very easy to do and as a first stage in getting your Arduino to run on battery power, it's essential that you understand the simple commands that need to be executed. The power drops quite a bit, but is it enough to run on batteries? This video, #115, provides the groundwork to part two (video #116) in which a different approach is taken to wake up the ATMEGA328P and in which we show exactly how much power is taken up by a "bare-bones" Arduino - you'll be amazed. --- Also, have a look at Thijs Ruiter's Kickstarter campaign - if he reaches his goal I'll do a proper review of his sound module: http://kck.st/2M2KeRr --- All links, sketches and other information: https://github.com/RalphBacon/Arduino-Deep-Sleep The 18650 Battery Charge Shield: https://www.aliexpress.com/item/ESP32-ESP32S-For-Wemos-For-Raspberry-Pi-18650-Battery-Charge-Shield-Board-V3-Micro-USB-Port/32870411748.html The official ATmega28P data sheet: http://ww1.microchip.com/downloads/en/DeviceDoc/ATmega328_P%20AVR%20MCU%20with%20picoPower%20Technology%20Data%20Sheet%2040001984A.pdf The FP6298 PWM converter datasheet: http://www.feeling-tech.com.tw/km-master/ezcatfiles/cust/img/img/24/fp6298v063.pdf Arduino pin mapping (GPIO numbers vs Chip numbers): https://www.arduino.cc/en/Hacking/PinMapping168 --- If you like this video please give it a thumbs up, share it and if you're not already subscribed please consider doing so :) My channel and blog are here: ------------------------------------------------------------------ https://www.youtube.com/RalphBacon https://ralphbacon.blog ------------------------------------------------------------------
Views: 4319 Ralph S Bacon
#108 Breadboard gripes 😡 plus Mega 2560 PRO (Eclipse version)
 
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New! https://ralphbacon.blog (Go on, have a look and subscribe!) Let's first talk about breadboards and how bad they can be. I mean, we have enough challenges to getting our projects working without dodgy breadboards getting in the way! OK, after my gripes on breadboards (and suggestions on some good-ish ones) we'll turn our attention to a nice little Mega board by RobotDyn. It's reasonably well-priced, all things considered, and is a good alternative to the full-sized version. Talking of alternatives, the Eclipse Oxygen 2 official IDE for all C++ development is a nice alternative to the standard Arduino IDE. It's a tad more complex but if you have outgrown the official Arduino IDE this may be for you. See the link below of a video that talks you through it (although he's quick so you may have to stop the video if you are following it as your doing it, as I was). So it's nearly Easter 2018 and I'm having a workshop set up, so bear with me if you don't hear quite so much of me, as I will painting and decorating and filling it with shelving units and whatnots! Not least, I have to get power out there with broadband, all of which I aim to do before Easter Sunday. Ha! We shall see. ====================================================== Here come the LINKS LINKS LINKS LINKS LINKS LINKS ====================================================== Banggood Resistor pack https://www.banggood.com/560-Pcs-1-ohm-to-10M-ohm-14W-1-Metal-Film-Resistor-56-Value-Assorted-Kit-p-1072159.html White Breadboard (small - 400 holes) https://eu.banggood.com/Wholesale-Warehouse-8_5-x-5_5cm-400-Tie-Points-400-Holes-Solderless-Breadboard-Bread-Board-wp-Eu-91872.html Transparent Breadboard (small - 400 holes pack of 5) https://www.aliexpress.com/item/5PCS-LOT-400-Tie-Point-Interlocking-Solderless-mini-Breadboard-Transparent-breadboard-for-arduino-83X55-mm-Crystal/32788899380.html Compact MEGA2560 Pro https://www.aliexpress.com/item/Mega-2560-PRO-Embed-CH340G-ATmega2560-16AU-NO-pinheaders-Compatible-for-Arduino-Mega-2560/32802420999.html Eclipse download (Oxygen 2) - use the "Eclipse IDE for C/C++ Developers" https://eclipse.org/downloads/packages/oxygen-2 Youtube video on how to install Eclipse Oxygen 2, by Doug Schaeffer https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TtPvkPpAx0E --- If you like this video please give it a thumbs up, share it and if you're not already subscribed please consider doing so :) My channel and blog are here: ------------------------------------------------------------------ https://www.youtube.com/RalphBacon https://ralphbacon.blog ------------------------------------------------------------------
Views: 4576 Ralph S Bacon
#99 Logic Analyzer for I2C, SPI and many more protocols
 
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So we Arduinites use I2C and SPI (and maybe a couple of other protocols) without really giving too much thought to what is happening to the signals going down the wires - until it goes wrong, that is! This cheeky little module lets us visualise exactly what is going on, using your PC as the screen and the USB cable as the means to transmit the signals back to the PC. The software is easy enough to install if a little time consuming (follow the instructions EXACTLY) and watch the demo to see how to use the Sigrok Pulseview utility with an Arduino. It is really brings the whole I2C bus (and others) to life. Hobby Components web page with full instructions http://forum.hobbycomponents.com/viewtopic.php?f=6&t=1411 Sigrok site for the driver(s) https://sigrok.org/wiki/Windows#Windows_installers Zadig Github with more information on installing those drivers https://github.com/pbatard/libwdi/wiki/Zadig Amazon UK site of the actual product but widely available https://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B00DAYAREW In the US, go to Amazon.com and search for "usb 8ch 24mhz 8 channel logic analyzer" and you will get (seemingly) identical products like this one: https://www.amazon.com/Logic-Analyzer-Device-Cable-Channel/dp/B06Y2TTFR1 Needless to say, the USA does everything bigger so you get a choice of about 8 similar products! I've placed the RTC (Real Time Clock) sketch from video #19 I use here (plus the I2C scanner) in my GitHub repository, super easy to download! https://github.com/RalphBacon/Logic-Analyser --- If you like this video please give it a thumbs up, share it and if you're not already subscribed please do so :) My channel is here: https://www.youtube.com/c/RalphBacon How can I remember this? Memory tip: "See" Ralph Bacon, geddit? [You can also use this link: https://www.youtube.com/RalphBacon]
Views: 9607 Ralph S Bacon
#21 Voltage Conversion: Linear Voltage Regulator vs Buck Converter
 
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The LS7805 linear voltage converter has been around for years and does a good job of providing a rock solid output voltage; but the new kid on the block, the step down buck converter has a few advantages so which one is better? Is a totally noise-free voltage a requirement? Or is superb efficiency an essential condition of your power supply? Watch this video and see what both these components can offer you. Feel free to add comments or questions below and, as always, Thanks For Watching! And my channel is here: https://www.youtube.com/c/RalphBacon How can I remember this? Memory tip: "See" Ralph Bacon, geddit?
Views: 3454 Ralph S Bacon
#117 Bare Bones 💀 Arduino (make your own)
 
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So in videos #115 and #116, we've discovered that the Arduino Uno/Nano ATmega328P chip can be run using just *microamps* of power and awoken with either a *trigger* or a *timer* respectively - but only when constructed in a bespoke manner. It's easy to do, and I show you here the handful of components you need to construct the absolute minimum Arduino configuration, how to upload a Bootloader to your bare ATmega328P chip, and finally how to upload code to the new chip. So now we can make the chip sleep for 99% of the time, and just wake up now and again to do its business (just like a baby)! All the links to products I mentioned (with which I have no connection whatsoever) ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ https://github.com/RalphBacon/Bare-Bones-Arduino ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Repeated here: The 3.3v / 5v FTDI USB to Serial converter. Get one. In fact, get a couple as they are extremely useful in other situations too. https://www.banggood.com/FT232RL-FTDI-USB-To-TTL-Serial-Converter-Adapter-Module-For-Arduino-p-917226.html?p=FQ040729393382015118&utm_campaign=25129675&utm_content=3312 At the time of writing Banggood were selling these for less than £2 each, with free shipping. All the Far Eastern warehouses (AliExpress, GearBest, Amazon and your favourite auction site eBay will stock these. Make sure it is the dual voltage type) 28-pin ZIF (zero insertion force) socket for the ATmega328P chip https://www.aliexpress.com/item/2-PCS-LOT-16-20-28-40-Pin-2-54MM-Green-DIP-Universal-ZIF-IC-Socket/32655076081.html At the time of writing, you could get two of these for £1.43 with free shipping (I've just ordered these!) The ZIF bootloader shield we stumbled across towards the end of the video, makes it very easy to load the bootloader using an Arduino https://www.aliexpress.com/item/AVR-ISP-Shield-Burning-Bootloader-Programmer-Atmega328P-Bootloader-module-with-buzzer-and-LED-indicator-for-Arduino/32853007180.html At the time of writing, this was just 2.89 - I've ordered one. If you like this video please give it a thumbs up, share it and if you're not already subscribed please consider doing so :) My channel and blog are here: https://www.youtube.com/RalphBacon https://ralphbacon.blog
Views: 4128 Ralph S Bacon
#106 RS485 Serial Data Transmission - on wires (no radio waves)
 
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New! https://ralphbacon.blog If data transmission via radio waves is not for you (see video #73 on the nRF24L01+ modules) then maybe good old 2-wire transmission using the RS485 interface is a better choice. The modules are to be had for pennies, the coding is simple and no libraries are required although we do use the SerialSoftware library to create a new serial port on arbitrary GPIO pins - not needed if you have a Mega 2560 as that four hardware serial ports built right into the hardware. Data transmission speed can be quite high (115200 bps) and distances quite long (1.2km) but not both at the same time! All in all, this can be a solution for outlying buildings, sheds, barns and the like as long as they have power. As a bonus, you get first look at my new blog which I'm going to use to fill the gaps between videos. Yes, I know, I'm spoiling you. All code can be found in my Github: https://github.com/RalphBacon/RS485-Serial-Data-Transmission Interesting links about stuff I mention in my video: Wikipedia article on RS485 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/RS-485 Bangood RS485 modules https://www.banggood.com/10Pcs-5V-MAX485-TTL-To-RS485-Converter-Module-Board-For-Arduino-p-1152561.html Nick Gammon's excellent article on RS486 including libraries and multidrop example http://www.gammon.com.au/forum/?id=11428 My new blog! All about stuff I never get to video about. https://ralphbacon.blog Here's one I made earlier... classic childrens TV http://www.bbc.co.uk/cult/classic/bluepeter/valpetejohn/trivia.shtml My channel and blog are here: ------------------------------------------------------------------ https://www.youtube.com/RalphBacon https://ralphbacon.blog ------------------------------------------------------------------
Views: 8809 Ralph S Bacon
#36 Control your Arduino from your phone - HC06 Bluetooth module
 
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So you've got a Smartphone running Android? Cool, then you can control your Arduino using an HC-06 (or HC-05) Bluetooth module and impress your friends as you turn on the lounge lighting from your phone! It takes just a few lines of code in your Arduino and a simple terminal emulator on your phone to get started in remotely controlling your Arduino, whether to turn on the lounge lights, your kids' toys, your electric curtains or your sprinkler system! I'll take you through the simple, few steps to get you started and then in *Part 2* (video #37) I'll show you how to create an app for your Android phone in about 15 minutes - easy! Here the links you want when you follow this video: https://www.dropbox.com/sh/8tf9fjb2tugkkr8/AAD0jaeRQlWhQtfv764pTEf5a?dl=0 1. The Arduino sketch: 2. The ultra-simple circuit diagram: 3. The link for the Android serial terminal app (from Play Store): 4. The HC06 Datasheet (good bedtime reading): If you like this video please give it a thumbs up, share and if not already subscribed please do so :) And my channel is here: ----------------------------------------------------------------- https://www.youtube.com/c/RalphBacon ------------------------------------------------------------------ How can I remember this? Memory tip: "See" Ralph Bacon, geddit?
Views: 7679 Ralph S Bacon
#125 TPL5110 Nano Power Timer (for Arduino)
 
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Want to control your microcontroller's power? This may be the answer. Sponsored by https://www.pcbway.com PCB - Prototype the Easy Way We are giving a free prototype for Christmas PCB and will choose one most popular design to be made 1,000 pcs to give away randomly as PCBWay 2018 Christmas Gift. **PCBWay Shopping Festival Nov-Dec 2018** Large Discounts, Coupon & Free Prototyping Christmas PCB Free prototyping for Christmas PCB from October 25 to December 10 Happy Halloween large discount or coupon from October 30 to November 1 https://www.pcbway.com/PCBWayShoppingFestival2018.aspx?t=2 All links and more in my GitHub https://github.com/RalphBacon/TPL5110-Nano-Power-System-Timer In a previous video #122, we explored switching off an Arduino (or other µcontoller) by using the device itself. In this video, we look at the TPL51110 device which does much the same thing but periodically - hence the timer part of the name. Adafruit breakout board: https://learn.adafruit.com/adafruit-tpl5110-power-timer-breakout?view=all An alternative breakout board: https://lowpowerlab.com/shop/product/147 Aliexpress source of bare SMD chip (lot of 10): https://www.aliexpress.com/item/10pcs-lot-TPL5110DDCR-TPL5110-ZALX-IC-6-SOT/32914309796.html TPL5110 Data Sheet http://www.ti.com/lit/ds/symlink/tpl5110.pdf There are some caveats covered in the video, but here's some extra information you may find useful: 1. The minimum delay/switch on period is 100mS ±0.6% 2. The maximum delay/switch on period is 2 hours ±0.6% (7200 seconds) 3. To get precise timings you will need to parallel two 1% tolerance resistors (the datasheet shows what values) 4. The "DONE" signal back to the TPL5110 from your microcontroller is 100nS minimum 5. The TPL5110 is only available as a surface mount device (and it is tiny) 6. The TPL5110 expects to drive a P-channel MOSFET that switches the power line to the µController. HIGH is OFF and LOW is ON. 7. This device plus supporting components consume about 20µA whilst in switch-off mode 8. This device works on voltages from 1.8 volts to 5.5 volts 9. All pins are 5v tolerant BUT must not exceed VDD + 0.3 volts (so if running on 3.3 volts must not exceed 3.6v) 10. The Adafruit breakout module has a maximum current capability of 4 Amps In a future video, we'll look at the TPL5111 which is subtly different. So having watched the video and understood how this device actually works, do you think it has a place in low-powered microcontroller devices (such as home automation, measuring, alarms and the like)? Comments, observations and question under the video please, I'd love to hear your thoughts. If you like this video please give it a thumbs up, share it and if you're not already subscribed please consider doing so :) My channel and blog are here: https://www.youtube.com/RalphBacon https://ralphbacon.blog
Views: 2298 Ralph S Bacon
#82 ATTiny85 + I2C  + SPI and more!
 
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New! https://ralphbacon.blog We investigated the ATTiny85 8-pin microcontroller a while ago so an update is well in order! This time we get it to do some useful things but is it enough to make this a your microcontroller chip of choice? We look at a development shield (fits a standard-size Uno) to make your programming much easier but there are a couple of caveats you really need to be aware of! Nice development kit though, and I'm almost tempted to say "Don't start programming the ATTiny85 without one!" (no, I don't get commission). Spoiler alert - a future video expands on its capabilities and I definitely warm to this tiny chip, almost to the point of becoming enthusiastic, so stay tuned for a future update! All the libraries, demo code and the like can be found on GitHub here: https://github.com/RalphBacon/ATTiny85 ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- And links to many items in the video can be found here (you need to watch the video to put this all in context): ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Add this addresses to File - Preferences - Additional Boards Manager URLs https://raw.githubusercontent.com/damellis/attiny/ide-1.6.x-boards-manager/package_damellis_attiny_index.json Other boards (watch the video) can be added too if you want: https://raw.githubusercontent.com/sparkfun/Arduino_Boards/master/IDE_Board_Manager/package_sparkfun_index.json http://digistump.com/package_digistump_index.json http://arduino.esp8266.com/stable/package_esp8266com_index.json Arduino Playground article on I2C for the ATTiny85 (Master & Slave) http://playground.arduino.cc/Code/USIi2c ATTiny85 Spec Sheet http://www.atmel.com/images/atmel-2586-avr-8-bit-microcontroller-attiny25-attiny45-attiny85_datasheet.pdf DS18B20 Datasheet (OneWire) https://datasheets.maximintegrated.com/en/ds/DS18B20.pdf Arduino/ATTiny85 website (contains RGB LED fader sketch for ATTiny85) http://attiny85.blogspot.co.uk/2013/05/rgb-tiny-rgb-led-controlled-by-attiny85.html --- If you like this video please give it a thumbs up, share it and if you're not already subscribed please do so :) My channel is here: ------------------------------------------------------------------ https://www.youtube.com/c/RalphBacon ------------------------------------------------------------------ How can I remember this? Memory tip: "See" Ralph Bacon, geddit?
Views: 27521 Ralph S Bacon
#114 No contact mains detector for Arduino & Pi 🥧(just 10 components)
 
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Safer Mains (Home Electricity) Detection How to detect the presence of mains electricity (in your home) using a RasPi or Arduino So I really want a SAFE way to detect mains in my workshop so can check whether I have left the lights, or more importantly, the heater on. This method is a NO CONTACT method using just a handful of discrete components and costing a couple of pounds (or dollars), if that much! It's easy to build on stripboard and runs from 3.3 volts to 5-volts. Actually, you can power this with 9v if you want, it will still work. ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- LINKS LINKS LINKS LINKS LINKS LINKS LINKS ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Everything here is in my GitHub: https://github.com/RalphBacon/Safer-Mains-Detection This is what gave me the inspiration: How to build your own non-contact voltage detector article (with video) by Kiran Daware https://www.jameco.com/Jameco/workshop/JamecoFavorites/non-contact-AC-voltage-detector.html 1PCS 5A Over current Protection Sensor Module AC Current Detection 12V Relay Module https://www.aliexpress.com/item/1PCS-5A-Overcurrent-Protection-Sensor-Module-AC-Current-Detection-12V-Relay-Module/32858449954.html An assortment of transistors like the ones I use here (2pence or US 3c each!) https://www.aliexpress.com/item/BC337-BC327-2N2222-2N2907-2N3904-2N3906-S8050-S8550-A1015-C1815-Transistor-Assortment-Kit-10value-200PCS-Transistors/32687065196.html Just watch as you open the lid so they don't all get mixed up (don't ask, no, really, don't) The sketch I used is simplicity itself but does demonstrate the use of a boolean variable to keep track of the last state. It's in the GitHub: https://github.com/RalphBacon/Safer-Mains-Detection If you like this video please give it a thumbs up, share it and if you're not already subscribed please consider doing so :) My channel and blog are here: ------------------------------------------------------------------ https://www.youtube.com/RalphBacon https://ralphbacon.blog ------------------------------------------------------------------
Views: 2781 Ralph S Bacon
#76 MPU6050 3-Axis Accelerometer Gyro - First Look
 
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New! https://ralphbacon.blog A cheap MPU6050 Accelerometer and Gyro can determine its orientation very well, and could be useful for quadcopters, drones or other model aeroplanes, as well as simpler experiments such as a digital spirit level like the one I create here in my demo. Whilst there is an excellent library by Jeff Rowberg that allows all the functionality possible with this device, my demo sketch doesn't use any, and relies on the raw data being manipulated to provide a stable and useful x-axis reading (in degrees) that could easily be extended to include the y- and z-axes too. Just to build on previous sketches, I'm using some neopixels here to provide the visual indication of how level the x-axis is, and with some jiggery pokery have managed to to get it to show the centre led when balanced with the leds to the left (or right) illuminated depending on how far off-balance it is. I'll be interested whether anyone kind think of any practical uses over and above stabilising a quadcopter or making a spirit level. ----------------------------------------------------- Here are the links you might need: ----------------------------------------------------- The demo sketch can be found here: https://github.com/RalphBacon/MPU6050_Accelerometer_Gyro (also download the accompanying GyroFunctions.h file in the same zip) eBay item GY-521 3 Axis Accelerometer Gyroscope Module 6 DOF Module MPU-6050 for Arduino http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/291194615968 Joop Brokking: MPU-6050 6dof IMU tutorial for auto-leveling quadcopters with Arduino source code Website: http://www.brokking.net/imu.html (also contains links to his videos) Part 1: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4BoIE8YQwM8 Part 2: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j-kE0AMEWy4 Sparkfun Guide to Accelerometers, Gyro and IMU (Inertial Measurement Unit) https://www.sparkfun.com/pages/accel_gyro_guide Arduino Playground on the MPU6050 http://playground.arduino.cc/Main/MPU-6050 Jeff Rowberg's i2cdevlib for advanced users https://github.com/jrowberg/i2cdevlib The Java IDE called "Processing v3.3" https://processing.org/download/?processing Instructions on how to set up "Processing v3.3" for the TeaPot (aeroplane) demo http://www.c-sharpcorner.com/article/3d-visualisation-of-imu-motion-sensor-in-processor-ide/ InvenSense (manufacturer) web page on the MPU6050 https://www.invensense.com/products/motion-tracking/6-axis/mpu-6050/ If you like this video please give it a thumbs up, share it and if you're not already subscribed please do so :) My channel is here: ------------------------------------------------------------------ https://www.youtube.com/c/RalphBacon ------------------------------------------------------------------ How can I remember this? Memory tip: "See" Ralph Bacon, geddit?
Views: 9129 Ralph S Bacon
#22 Using an SD card to log data - and how to improve the reliability!
 
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How to interface an inexpensive SD Card Reader / Writer to your Arduino using an SPI bus - easier than you might think. I also describe some simple modifications you can make to improve the reliability of the hardware, and (courtesy of Adafruit) enhance the functionality of the library software. If you're logging a temperature, counting the number of bees going into your hive, monitoring the rain level or whatever you need a reliable way of logging that data to an SD card - without coming back a week later to find there is no data written to the card! Using an inexpensive, widely available SD module , this video tells you everything you need to know to make your SD logging module as robust as you can without breaking the bank. Link to the final code - remember if you get an error with the SD.end you need the new, improved library, as described here: Demo Code link: https://www.dropbox.com/sh/blpdw5mwq5p7sv1/AACaqXSsjNwjfPzGbYjFh1DSa?dl=0 New, improved SD library (courtesy of Adafruit) : https://github.com/adafruit/SD Just click the download button and extract the SD library into your library folder and delete the original one in the library your Arduino folder (under Program Files (x86)) as this one supersedes it. Feel free to add comments or questions below and, as always, Thanks For Watching! And my channel is here: https://www.youtube.com/c/RalphBacon How can I remember this? Memory tip: "See" Ralph Bacon, geddit?
Views: 4820 Ralph S Bacon
#23 LCD BIG DIGITS for your Arduino using I2C - Easy!
 
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Using an LCD display is very easy using the I2C communications bus (just two wires plus power). Creating custom digits that take up two lines is also very easy and I show you exactly how to do that here. So now your temperature gauge can now be read from across the other side of the room! Step by step example of how to create a simple, single custom character first, then we use that knowledge to create further custom characters that we put together to make some BIG DIGITS. The two demo code sketches (just copy them into a folder of EXACTLY the same name in your sketches folder) are linked below. You'll have great fun tinkering with the shapes of the characters - can you make it look better than mine? (Rhetorical question, of course not!!!) Here are the links to the two demo sketches and the Liquid Crystal I2C library: https://github.com/RalphBacon/LCD_Big_digits Remember, for the second sketch you need to send any character from the Serial Monitor window (by pressing SEND) to move on to the next part of the demo). Questions, comments and constructive suggestions can be left below the video. And please SUBSCRIBE so you don't miss any future videos. And, as always, Thanks For Watching! And my channel is here: https://www.youtube.com/c/RalphBacon How can I remember this? Memory tip: "See" Ralph Bacon, geddit?
Views: 7009 Ralph S Bacon
#92 JYE Oscilloscope Kit ⚡ (Review & Build)
 
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New! https://ralphbacon.blog I was tempted to buy this kit on several occasions to share my experience of it with you - and now I can do that as Banggood have sent me this kit for review. It's small, fairly easy to build as long as you have some basic soldering skills and it does the job as long as you don't expect the performance of an oscilloscope costing ten times this price! Luckily it has all the SMD (surface mount device) components already in place so all that is left to do is solder in the THT (through-hole-technology) components such as resistors, capacitors, a few switches and bits and bobs (new technical term!) I show you the steps taken (and I did not deviate from the included - and well-written - instruction sheet) with comments, hints, tips and even a trap or two that might fox you. The enclosure (or housing) can make a real difference to the perceived quality of the components and this one is pretty good, IMHO. Recommended for a beginner? If you can solder joints consistently and have the right tools (thin tip soldering iron, lead solder, flush cutters, small Philips style screwdriver) then yes, it's a nice project. Moreover it could be very useful as you develop Arduino-type solutions as you can see the waveforms and pulse trains generated in your project. ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ LINKS LINKS LINKS LINKS LINKS LINKS LINKS ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ Here are the links of most of the items I mention in the video (and no, I don't get commision on any of them, not even from Banggood!) Original JYE Tech DSO-SHELL DSO150 15001K DIY Digital Oscilloscope Kit With Housing https://ban.ggood.vip/119y PLEASE USE THE ABOVE LINK SO BANGGOOD KNOW IT WAS FROM MY VIDEO! Soldering Heat sink / Heat shunt spring clip USA: https://www.circuitspecialists.com/ht-156.html UK: https://www.jaycar.co.uk/soldering-heatsink-component-holder/p/TD2122 DANIU Heavy Duty Soldering Solder Iron Tip Cleaner Steel Wire (Banggood but available everywhere) https://www.banggood.com/Wholesale-DANIU-1-Pcs-Heavy-Duty-Soldering-Solder-Iron-Tip-Cleaner-Steel-Wire-With-Stand-Set-NEW-p-51729.html Nylon brush (comes in a set of three with brass and steel too) (Banggood but available everywhere) https://www.banggood.com/3pc-Mini-Wire-Brush-Set-Steel-Brass-Nylon-Bristle-For-Cleaning-p-932689.html Realacc Strange Third Hand Six Arm Soldering Station with USB Fan. I've already done a video on this version. This is the version I have although there is an updated version with SEVEN arms (but more expensive) https://www.banggood.com/Realacc-Strange-Third-Hand-Six-Arm-Soldering-Station-with-USB-Fan-p-1081818.html If you like this video please give it a thumbs up, share it and if you're not already subscribed please do so :) My channel is here: ------------------------------------------------------------------ https://www.youtube.com/c/RalphBacon ------------------------------------------------------------------ How can I remember this? Memory tip: "See" Ralph Bacon, geddit? [You can also use this link: https://www.youtube.com/RalphBacon]
Views: 10173 Ralph S Bacon
#34 RFID Reader/Writer (Mifare MFRC522) with a Logic Level Shifter
 
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Secure access is often controlled with a credit card sized security pass, such as the Mifare RC522 Classic, available for just a few dollars (or pounds). Here I show you the basics of how to read and write data from and to the RC522 Mifare card (or fob) and discuss what we're going to do about encryption to protect personal data stored on that card. And if you have an Arduino UNO or other 5v board then you WILL need to use a Logic Level Shifter to convert the 5 volts on the GPIO pins down to 3.3 volts for the RFID read (and back again - bidirectional). Cheap as chips and easy to wire up. HERE ARE THE LINKS TO MATERIAL MENTIONED OR DEMONSTRATED IN THE VIDEO: ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- MiguelBalboa's excellent RFID library: https://github.com/miguelbalboa/rfid Look at the numerous examples in that library (which we have explored just a couple of items in the video). ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- The MFRC522 data sheet: (covers other hardware too) http://www.nxp.com/documents/data_sheet/MF1S50YYX_V1.pdf (Note: this should be V3 and dated 3rd March 2014) It covers everything you wanted to know (and plenty you probably don't care about) but makes for interesting reading nonetheless. ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- A great utility to convert hex to ascii (and back) and to many other formats such as ROT13, Binary, BASE64 etc): http://www.asciitohex.com/ which we used in the video to convert the hex format personal data on the card to ascii (and back again) ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- As always Thanks For Watching and please subscribe if you find these videos useful - new ones weekly (ish). And my *channel* is here: ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- https://www.youtube.com/c/RalphBacon ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- How can I remember this? Memory tip: "See" Ralph Bacon, geddit?
Views: 23002 Ralph S Bacon
#127 Relay Comparison - Electromechanical, SSR, Latching
 
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This video sponsored by https://www.pcbway.com We invite you to join the 2nd PCB design contest to win highest $1000.00 cash reward. Check the guide to find more information. https://www.pcbway.com/project/PCB_DESIGN_CONTEST.aspx All details of this video, including links, are on my GitHub: https://github.com/RalphBacon/Relay-Head-to-Head All relays provide some form of switch. Relays come in various shapes, sizes and purposes. They are operated electrically, electronically or even manually. In our Arduinite world, they are used to enable higher voltages and/or currents to be switched by something that could not handle that requirement. So your Arduino, PIC or Raspberry Pi can now switch high current household voltages without a problem. So which one to choose? And why choose one type over another? In this video, we look first at the traditional, electromechanical relay. It's a switch that is operated by an electromagnetic coil. I've already done a complete video on the ins and outs of such a video but we summarise it here. If you want the full details watch this other video #18 Opto-isolated Relay: https://youtu.be/d9evR-K6FAY We next look at a Solid State Relay (SSR). This is not a mechanical switch at all, but an electronic one. As such there are some disadvantages to using it but also some advantages too. For example, SSRs take up little room and are optoisolated by default. No moving parts, either. But they are connected to the switching voltage at all times, even when off. There are some precautions to be taken when using Solid State Relays so I've included a PDF document for some bedtime reading: https://omronfs.omron.com/en_US/ecb/products/pdf/precautions_ssr.pdf Finally, we take a look at a mechanical latching relay. It's a bit like the first one, but the switching process, from one contact to another, is a latching process. Once switched, using one coil, you need to un-switch it using another coil. This could be very useful in low power circuits, as an alternative to using MOSFETs, perhaps. Now be aware that some Far Eastern manufacturers offer "latching" relays that are not the same as the one used here. Their "latching" mechanism still requires power to be applied at all times, and the flip-flop between contacts is controlled by a further on-board component. You just supply a high or low to a single input and the latching process happens - but it's not permanent (across power breaks) and it's not a true latching process at all. Caveat emptor! Here's an example of a hardware-controlled flip-flop "latching" relay - NOT what we mean in this video at all! https://www.aliexpress.com/item/OOTDTY-6-24V-Flip-Flop-Latch-Relay-Bistable-Self-locking-Low-Pulse-Trigger-Module/32884746156.html Do not buy this unless you understand what you are buying! LINKS LINKS LINKS LINKS LINKS LINKS LINKS (Some links may be affiliate links which pay me a commission - doesn't affect my editorial content either way) Opto-isolated electromechanical (traditional) relay double pack (ensure you get OPTOCOUPLED or OPTOISOLATED): https://www.banggood.com/2Pcs-5V-1-Channel-Level-Trigger-Optocoupler-Relay-Module-For-Arduino-p-1366337.html?p=FQ040729393382015118&utm_campaign=25129675&utm_content=3312 Solid State Relay (SSR) https://www.banggood.com/One-way-Solid-State-Relay-Module-For-Arduino-p-979853.html?p=FQ040729393382015118&utm_campaign=25129675&utm_content=3312 https://www.aliexpress.com/item/5V-1-Channel-OMRON-SSR-G3MB-202P-Solid-State-Relay-Module-240V-2A-Output-with-Resistive/32311293343.html SSR Spec Sheet as used in the video: https://www.openhacks.com/uploadsproductos/g3mb-ssr-datasheet.pdf Latching (bistable) relay (also other multi-packs available, cheaper) https://www.aliexpress.com/item/12V-Coil-Bistable-Latching-Relay-DPDT-2A-30VDC-1A-125VAC-HFD2-005-S-L2-D-Realy/32908954230.html Also in packs of two (and more, check the website): https://www.aliexpress.com/item/2PCS-lot-HFD2-005-M-L2-D-HFD2-005-M-L2-D-10pin-5V/32717910397.html Useful background reading on relays on Wikipedia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Relay --- If you like this video please give it a thumbs up, share it and if you're not already subscribed please consider doing so :) My channel and blog are here: ------------------------------------------------------------------ https://www.youtube.com/RalphBacon https://ralphbacon.blog ------------------------------------------------------------------
Views: 2824 Ralph S Bacon
#119 Bootloader Shield 🛡️ and 8Mhz Arduino Barebones (made easy)
 
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We can make life a little easier for beginners to the Arduino world with this Bootloader Shield. It's easy to use, cheap and does the job nicely with ATmega328P DIP chips, ideal for breadboard experiments. As an added bonus, because we're running at just 8Mhz (using the in-built oscillator) we can dispense with the crystal and two capacitors, which can just get in the way whilst we're experimenting. Why would you need to upload a bootloader? Some reasons are mentioned in the video, but the most common one is to replace (or repair) a bootloader that has incorrect "fuse" settings and does not allow further sketches to be uploaded, or which runs the Arduino at the wrong speed. And there's more! By understanding what the Bootloader is doing we can expand on the standard bootloader in future demos, making it really work for us. Or we can perhaps dispense with a bootloader - what does that mean for uploading sketches? Stay tuned! All links are in my GitHub: https://github.com/RalphBacon/Bootloader-Shield-8MHz --- If you like this video please give it a thumbs up, share it and if you're not already subscribed please consider doing so :) My channel and blog are here: https://www.youtube.com/RalphBacon https://ralphbacon.blog
Views: 2414 Ralph S Bacon
#87 Six, yes SIX, GPIO pins on an ATTiny85
 
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So you like the ATTiny85 chip but wish you could use ALL the pins as GPIO pins? Your wish is granted! OK, you have to build (or buy) a fuse resetter (I show you how) but it's a small project that just about anyone with a soldering iron can successfully complete (Benny built mine and he's got no thumbs, remember). And if you watched my video last week (#86) you got an inadvertent sneak peek! Oops! If you really don't want to build one for a few dollars, you can always buy one ready made, but at least by watching this video you will understand what it is doing. There are some minor "gotchas" to watch out for (just one or two but definitely worth knowing about) but when it comes down to it YES you CAN have all SIX GPIO pins working on a Tiny85, as I prove in this video. I wish I had known this a few years ago as I would now be using my ATTiny85 instead of a Nano to control my fridge door alarm, that's for sure. Sometimes a Tiny85 is all you need. And it can run off batteries for weeks if not months, as my previous video on the Tiny85 mentioned. The code I used to reset the fuse can be found here: https://github.com/RalphBacon/ATTiny85_Fuse_Resetter =============================== LINKS LINKS LINKS and MORE LINKS! =============================== High Voltage programming/Unbricking for Attiny - Yikes! Invalid device signature https://arduinodiy.wordpress.com/2015/05/16/high-voltage-programmingunbricking-for-attiny/ ATTiny85 Spec Sheet (Good Bedtime Reading, really!) Page 184-185 has graphs showing the current/voltage. http://www.atmel.com/images/atmel-2586-avr-8-bit-microcontroller-attiny25-attiny45-attiny85_datasheet.pdf Embedded Fuse Calculator (for all ATMEL chips) http://www.engbedded.com/fusecalc/ All about ATMEGA328P (Uno/Nano) Fuse Settings http://www.martyncurrey.com/arduino-atmega-328p-fuse-settings/ Setting and reading AtTiny85 fuses https://dntruong.wordpress.com/2015/07/08/setting-and-reading-attiny85-fuses/ You can use AVRDUDE (that's the AVR DownandUploadDEr - contrived or what?) to give you info on fuses too. Run PowerShell from Windows Start Button, then execute these commands: CD "C:\Program Files (x86)\Arduino\hardware\tools\avr\bin" ./avrdude.exe -c stk500v1 -p attiny85 -P com7 -U lfuse:r:-:i -v -C ..\etc\avrdude.conf -b 19200 -F 1. You can remove the -F that just skips an invalid signature (like if you have the RESET pin configured as an IO pin!) 2. *** Note the path must be in quotes *** 3. If you are not running a 64-bit Windows version (eg Windows 10) your path might be different so remove the (x86) bit from the path.
Views: 7675 Ralph S Bacon
#78 See thru walls! Microwave Movement Sensor
 
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New! https://ralphbacon.blog Two µwave movement sensors go head-to-head, the HB100 and the XYC-WB-DC. Both operate using µwaves but give very different results. Microwaves can see through doors and walls but is this what you need in a movement detector? And are they better than the ubiquitous PIR sensor? We'll see in the video. The good thing is that at least one of these devices costs (a lot) less than a cup of barista-made coffee so it's worth just experimenting so see how it might fit in your next project. Added to the fact that documentation on these devices is a bit sparse (and especially how we might connect them to an Arduino) it was fun trying to get these working as you might want them to work. Was I successful? Well, the video reveals all! All sketches, libraries, pictures and other useful links can be found by following my GitHub link below, just choose the "download or clone" button and download a zip of all the files. ---------------------------------------------------------- Link to all sketches and information: ---------------------------------------------------------- https://github.com/RalphBacon/Microwave-Movement-Sensors If you like this video please give it a thumbs up, share it and if you're not already subscribed please do so :) My channel is here: ------------------------------------------------------------------ https://www.youtube.com/c/RalphBacon ------------------------------------------------------------------ How can I remember this? Memory tip: "See" Ralph Bacon, geddit?
Views: 21515 Ralph S Bacon
#118 ESP8266 Deep Sleep 💥 and Bare Bones ESP (easy)
 
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We covered the Arduino's Deep Sleep in videos #115 & #116 so now it's the turn of the ESP8266 to have a snooze. It works differently to the Arduino ATmega328P so be prepared to implement your solutions differently with an ESP8266. It's not difficult at all but does require some thinking about how to continue where you left off. We also explore how much current an ESP8266-12E takes when in Deep Sleep mode (spoiler alert: not much). But remember the ESP8266 is a power-hungry beast at the best of times with all that Wi-Fi connectivity. In order to measure the current, we have to build a Bare Bones version of the ESP8266 board using a simple breakout PCB, making it very easy to mount on a breadboard. As usual, all links will be found in the GitHub and repeated here too. https://github.com/RalphBacon/ESP8266-Deep-Sleep ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------- LINKS LINKS LINKS LINKS LINKS LINKS ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------- ESP8266 (supports various modules) Vertical Breakout Board (UK Seller but generally available) https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/ESP8266-ESP-12-E-F-ESP-08-ESP-07-WiFi-Vertical-Breakout-Adapter-Board-UK-SELLER/400962734633 Same as above but WITH an ESP8266-12f module to solder onto it (very easy) https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/ESP8266-ESP-12F-WiFi-Wireless-Module-Vertical-Breakout-Adapter-Board-UK-FAST/401021445107 Behind the scenes ESP library containing (among many other useful things) the function to determine why the module woke up Note, these two files are part of a much larger library for the ESP8266, but linked here for reference. https://github.com/esp8266/Arduino/blob/master/cores/esp8266/Esp.h https://github.com/esp8266/Arduino/blob/master/cores/esp8266/Esp.cpp Everything you ever need to know about the ESP8266, published on May 14, 2017 by Ivan Grokhotkov https://media.readthedocs.org/pdf/arduino-esp8266/docs_to_readthedocs/arduino-esp8266.pdf Espressif's own short document on lower power solutions, v1.1, published 2016. https://www.espressif.com/sites/default/files/9b-esp8266-low_power_solutions_en_0.pdf Have I missed any links? Let me know in the comments section below the video! --- If you like this video please give it a thumbs up, share it and if you're not already subscribed please consider doing so :) My channel and blog are here: ------------------------------------------------------------------ https://www.youtube.com/RalphBacon https://ralphbacon.blog ------------------------------------------------------------------
Views: 4099 Ralph S Bacon
#88 Digital Potentiometer aka Volume Control - Easy
 
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If you ever wanted to adjust a circuit using a digital version of a potentiometer (variable resistor) controlled by an Arduino then this is the easy way to do it - and at a price that won't break the bank either. Even better, it remembers the last setting if you switch it off, but do watch the video for some caveats of this feature. It would be straightforward to use an infrared remote control to control the volume, for example, of an amplifier by using one of these devices. There are only three control wires and of course the three wires that represent the variable resistor too. In my GitHub there's a link to the PDF for this device (I'm using the 10K version - X9C103, but other values are available, see the video for more details). Also, of course, there are the two demo sketches I use, simplicity itself and ones that a beginner could easily use. Github link: https://github.com/RalphBacon/Digital-Potentiometer-aka-Variable-Resistor If you like this video please give it a thumbs up, share it and if you're not already subscribed please do so :) My channel is here: ------------------------------------------------------------------ https://www.youtube.com/c/RalphBacon ------------------------------------------------------------------ How can I remember this? Memory tip: "See" Ralph Bacon, geddit? [You can also use this link: https://www.youtube.com/RalphBacon]
Views: 11720 Ralph S Bacon
#29 Essential Arduino Workbench tools
 
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When you're starting to actually build Arduino projects then you need some essential workbench tools - but which ones do you NEED and which ones are just NICE TO HAVE? Have a look at some of my essential (and not so essential!) tools that I use when building actual Arduino electronics projects to make your construction that little bit easier. And a quick view at some electronic items that I've been playing with (with mixed success) and a Christmas project teaser... As always, Thanks For Watching and leave any comments or queries in the comments below. And my channel is here: ------------------------------------------------------------------ https://www.youtube.com/c/RalphBacon ------------------------------------------------------------------ How can I remember this? Memory tip: "See" Ralph Bacon, geddit?
Views: 2820 Ralph S Bacon
#96 Rotary Encoder Update - Stepless & Software Debounced
 
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A couple of recent comments on a previous video #19 (Rotary Encoders) made me think and ponder. So here's an update that looks at both the original sketch and stepped Rotary Encoder and also at a newer detentless (stepless) one, with the problems it potentially presents. We also consider how best to debounce the signal in software and what happens if you change the way I originally did it with a Real World example of my car radio - yes, really! I've included a link to a GitHub repository with the simple test sketches I used just so you can grab them and play about with them yourself, along with links to the stepless Rotary Encoder (rather more than I'd want to pay but it was supplied by a local supplier rather than a Far Eastern warehouse so would be more, of course). -------------------------------- LINKS LINKS LINKS! -------------------------------- https://github.com/RalphBacon/RotaryEncoderUpdate Bourns Pro Audio Rotary Encoder Spec Sheet (generic) http://www.bourns.com/docs/Product-Datasheets/pec16.pdf Example eBay item for stepless rotary encoder http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/INCREMENTAL-ENCODER-2CH-100RPM-NWK-PN-PEC16-4020F-N0024-/272876778384?hash=item3f88b93390:g:G4cAAOSwoF1Z16RK NOTE: The PEC-016 part number convention is that the second digit determines whether it is stepped or not. Eg: PEC16-4020F-N0024 - it's the 4020F that is important - the second digit here (0) means STEPLESS The next part, N0024 determine whether a SWITCH pin is included (N=NO, S=YES) and the 24 shows how many steps per revolution Nick Gammon's web page on Interrupts: https://www.gammon.com.au/forum/bbshowpost.php?id=11488 The sketches used in the demo are in the repository. Just download as a zip file and unzip on your local machine. If you like this video please give it a thumbs up, share it and if you're not already subscribed please do so :) My channel is here: ------------------------------------------------------------------ https://www.youtube.com/c/RalphBacon ------------------------------------------------------------------ How can I remember this? Memory tip: "See" Ralph Bacon, geddit? [You can also use this link: https://www.youtube.com/RalphBacon]
Views: 8576 Ralph S Bacon
#74 Web Enable your Arduino (ENC28J60 or W5100 Ethernet Controller)
 
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New! https://ralphbacon.blog It's easy to fit an Ethernet Controller module to your Arduino board that will let you serve a web-page to your browser or smartphone - as well as send you an email to alert you to potential issues. Using the simple, four-wire SPI communications protocol it's easy to wire up an ENC28J60 to any Arduino UNO, Nano or Mega - and if you use the W5100 board there's no wiring to be done! What could be simpler than that? It's one thing to wire up an Ethernet Controller, but how do you write the HTML to create a (simple) web page? I show you how, and how we save valuable run-time SRAM. It's not complicated and if you download the fully documented example sketch it will be very obvious how it hangs together. In the next part we'll cover the (even simpler) process to send an email, and then we'll tie everything together into one project. This is going to monitor my attic water temperature and water level and will alert me if either is too low (no burst pipes for me!). The example sketch is available below, together with links to the UIPEthernet library I use and other information you may find useful. Demo sketch, UIPEthernet Library, Connection Diagram... https://github.com/RalphBacon/Arduino_Ethernet_ENC28J60_W5100/ Github UIPEthernet library (most recent) https://github.com/UIPEthernet In depth PROGMEM guide by Nick Gammon (from Arduino.cc forum) http://www.gammon.com.au/progmem If you like this video please give it a thumbs up, share it and if you're not already subscribed please do so :) My channel is here: ------------------------------------------------------------------ https://www.youtube.com/c/RalphBacon ------------------------------------------------------------------ How can I remember this? Memory tip: "See" Ralph Bacon, geddit?
Views: 7896 Ralph S Bacon
#58 Strange Third Hand - and other tools for Arduino projects
 
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New! https://ralphbacon.blog Sometimes an odd creation comes to life and this is the case with this Strange Third Hand that aims to give you assistance when creating Arduino-style projects, soldering, drilling and general lightweight DIY. It took me a while to decide to stump up the money but even though I've used it for just one project so far, I've found it really, really useful. Watch the video to find out more (and a live soldering session!). Soldering is definitely a skill that beginners lack, so the addition of a few tools to aid that whole activity can only be for the good. So here I show you a couple of other items that may help you, or, if you're like me and make the occasional (cough, cough) mistake or two, something to make undoing those mistakes less of a chore whilst ensuring you don't damage your components or circuit board. No, you can't teach experience but I do believe that lessons can be learned by watching others (me, that is) and speed up that learning curve so that you too can be confident in creating Arduino projects that are reliable, robust and will last the course! No sketch this week but the video contains the source of all my purchases and I promise not to mention Banggood again for at least a whole video. Heh, heh! If you like this video please give it a thumbs up, share and if not already subscribed please do so :) And my channel is here: ----------------------------------------------------------------- https://www.youtube.com/c/RalphBacon ------------------------------------------------------------------ How can I remember this? Memory tip: "See" Ralph Bacon, geddit?
Views: 1423 Ralph S Bacon
#32 Load Cell Coffee Cup Coaster (Part 2) - the code
 
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# Load Cell Part 2 The final sketch to actually weigh something (like a cup of coffee) Here I explain the code required to configure the Load Cell and how it all comes together in the finished Coffee Cup Coaster project. In video #31 we were introduced to the Load Cell and here in video 32 we have a finished project as a trivial implementation but which demonstrates the techniques required to calibrate the Load Cell and how then to use it in a Real World Project. Link to the load cell (500g): http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Aluminum-Electronic-Balance-Four-Wire-Weighing-Load-Cell-Sensor-YCZ-191-500g-/191598861371 Using the HX711 makes it all very simple and straightforward, especially using the library that I recommend you use in your project. It even has methods to power down the HX711 for use in battery powered devices. The sketch can be found here in this GitHub. https://github.com/RalphBacon/Load-Cell-Part-2 (Note: slightly updated, see my comments in the previous video, under the video itself) Other calibration links can be found here (do step 1 then step 2) https://github.com/RalphBacon/Load-Cell-Part-1 As always, Thanks For Watching! And my channel is here: ------------------------------------------------------------------ https://www.youtube.com/c/RalphBacon ------------------------------------------------------------------ How can I remember this? Memory tip: "See" Ralph Bacon, geddit?
Views: 22299 Ralph S Bacon
#50 TP4056 UPS - protect from power outs and brown outs
 
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New! https:/ralphbacon.blog So your fantastic Arduino project is up and running, then POW! The lights go out and so does the power to your Arduino project. Even a very quick power drop, aka a Brown Out, can cause your Arduino to reset, potentially losing data it is collecting. But if you implement a VERY *simple* and *cheap* UPS (Uninterruptable Power Supply) using just three components you can protect your Arduino so it can continue with data logging or monitoring or whatever is supposed to be doing. In this demo I use a (spoiler alert!) TINY battery that can keep an Arduino project running for a long, long time (over an hour in this case but totally dependent on what power you're drawing in the remainder of your project, of course). Best of all, the TP4056 module board I'm using here has been updated so that it has battery protection circuitry built in, so there's no danger of either over-charging your battery nor or over-discharging it either. And it's totally automatic. Brilliant! If you have a solar cell that can generate 5V then it can also be used for that, so your battery is charged when there is sufficient sunlight but falls back to battery power when it's dark. Use a larger capacity battery than I am using here and it could run all night. It's an interesting (not to mention cheap) introduction into rechargeable battery technology so give it a go. I've not included a sketch because it is just a slightly modified 'Blink' sketch - the video contains all the details you'll need! Battery: http://bit.ly/2blrZKn 5v LiPo Charger: http://bit.ly/2boKtDu Step up converter:http://ebay.eu/2bFK3hA (note that this last item was not where I got it from - he is not currently listing items for sale. However, this is an identical item - many sellers have this). Simple Schematic: https://www.dropbox.com/s/cgdw9b6rdun1fq8/20160903_173125.jpg?dl=0 If you like this video please give it a thumbs up, share and if not already subscribed please do so :) And my channel is here: ----------------------------------------------------------------- https://www.youtube.com/c/RalphBacon ------------------------------------------------------------------ How can I remember this? Memory tip: "See" Ralph Bacon, geddit?
Views: 5338 Ralph S Bacon
#112 Analog inputs for your Raspberry Pi 🥧Model 3B+ (easy)
 
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The Raspberry Pi (I'm using a Model 3B+) has no analog input pins at all. So how do you measure analog voltages then? Simply connect a Microchip Analog-to-Digital-Converter (ADC) chip that uses SPI and you're in business. Just to make it _really_ easy we can use a kit of parts from RasPiO, a UK-based company. I have no connection with this company at all, and I didn't get the product for free or at a reduced rate. I noticed whilst editing this video that the audio could vary as I turned from desk to soldering station; I'm already thinking of what I can do to improve this (without buying another expensive microphone). I might be able to use the built-in microphone from my video camera to augment the audio. We shall see how it works in future videos! The sketch (OK, Python program) can be found in my Github https://github.com/RalphBacon/Raspberry-Pi-Analog-Inputs Source of the Analog Zero kit http://rasp.io/analogzero/ User guide for the Analog Zero kit (very useful) http://rasp.io/wp-content/uploads/2016/06/RasPiO-Analog-Zero.pdf Datasheet for the 10-bit Microchip 3008 http://ww1.microchip.com/downloads/en/DeviceDoc/21295C.pdf Datasheet for the 12-bit Microchip 3208 http://ww1.microchip.com/downloads/en/DeviceDoc/21298c.pdf VNC viewer for connecting your Windows PC to the Raspberry Pi https://www.realvnc.com/en/connect/download/viewer/ --- If you like this video please give it a thumbs up, share it and if you're not already subscribed please consider doing so :) My channel and blog are here: ------------------------------------------------------------------ https://www.youtube.com/RalphBacon https://ralphbacon.blog ------------------------------------------------------------------
Views: 3542 Ralph S Bacon
#24 Four ways to RESET your Arduino
 
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Amazing though it may seem things do not always go to plan. Here I describe how you can recover from a 'hang up' in your Arduino project from the simple to the better - and how to avoid a solution that really is not one. We've all been there: your Arduino suddenly 'freezes' and you wonder what's going on. This video describes how you can (gracefully) recover from such a situation and get your Arduino running again. Especially useful if your Arduino is not close by, or installed in a hostile environment (such as a bee hive!). Demo code: Here are the links to each of the demo code 'ino' sketches. Copy each one to a folder of EXACTLY the same name in your sketches folder. All the following can be found here: https://www.dropbox.com/sh/sfaav2wqzygy97g/AABuIrOhjRCT_qJwa4mbvz6Ea?dl=0 1. Simple Reset Function (RST) 2. Pseudo Reset Function (not good idea) 3. Watch Dog Timer Reset (best way) 4. Relay Reset for entire project 5. Circuit diagram for Relay Reset Comments? Queries? Suggestions? Leave them below! As always, Thanks for Watching! And my channel is here: https://www.youtube.com/c/RalphBacon How can I remember this? Memory tip: "See" Ralph Bacon, geddit?
Views: 35054 Ralph S Bacon
#33 ESP8266 WiFi Web Server, Arduino style - Introduction
 
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Using an ESP8266-based, Arduino-sized board for WiFi control of your environment is a great way to get into remote control, data-logging and so on. Read the temperature of your greenhouse; turn on a fan in your home from your browser in the office... the possibilities are endless. All with a few lines of C++ code and a smattering of HTML (very easy). This is just a quick(ish) intro into the world of WiFi control - I'll think of a Real World project in the near(is) future - unless you have some ideas? Drop them into the comments section below. All PDFs and other links on how to set up these great boards can be found in the comments section below, including where I procured these devices. ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- The demo sketch can be found here, and I've included two PDFs that describe the boards in the video and the installation process: https://github.com/RalphBacon/ESP8266-WiFi-Web-Server-Arduino-style---Introduction ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- As always, Thanks for Watching and do subscribe so you don't miss future videos that will help you get your project off the ground. And my channel is here: ------------------------------------------------------------------ https://www.youtube.com/c/RalphBacon ------------------------------------------------------------------ How can I remember this? Memory tip: "See" Ralph Bacon, geddit?
Views: 17590 Ralph S Bacon

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